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Lakeland Newspaper 




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AN0757 10/29/91 **C-5 L , 
AtfflOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY Uy 

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Antioch Nc ws-Reporter 



VOL. 105-NO.33 



ANTIOCH, AUGUST 16, 1991 



TWO SECTIONS-72 PAGES 500 PER COPY 



|SEaiti»riaI,;g,,»„.«....10-ll 

; Elected offidal'swrofig'abbu^ 

lalilla the Hon reveals her "vilal statistics.' ■ 

[•Obituaries .....-^.SS 

pla|ss^^ 

Warriors take litjeal tikelancte'Summer 

'fle^g, 

''^'^ii7f*"1" ^ 



Death comes from across the street 

by DOUG DUSIK 

.Lakeland Newspapers 

The Lake County Sheriff s Office was 
busy working Wednesday with ihe Federal 
Bureau of Investigation on the case of a 
strangled 38-ycar-old Spring Grove 
woman and her suspected neighbor, who 
was still on the lam. 



Police suspect she had been bound to the 
bed with duct tape and strangled with an 
electiic conL 

Pauly's sister found the body Friday 
evening after the Spring Grove woman 
failed to meet a date. 

Neighbors have said Pauly was very 



security conscious^ having been 
burglarized several years ago. But the extra 
locks and security lighting that the 
widowed victim installed were of little 
avail when Mason attacked her from 
behind before she had a chance to clcse the 
(Continued on Page 8) 



Burl Mason, 31, a recent prison parolee 
who lived at his mother's Spring Grove 
cottage, is accused of killing his neighbor 
across the street on the evening of Aug. 8. 

According to authorities. Mason may 
have suprised Susan Pauly from behind as 
she carried an armload of groceries into her 
home. Investigators found groceries 
scattered about her living room floor. 

Inside the bedroom, Pauly's naked body 
was found in her bed covered by a sheet 



Opposition to ACH 
referendum forms 




by DOUG DUSIK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

This November's $32 million 
referendum for the Antioch Community 




Taking time 



Uslna the Fox River as the fountain of wisdom, a couple takes time for a silent 
Sgue with the water as they dip and pull thair paddies dunng an outing. 
-Photo by Bob Undel 




High School district will not include 
another a silent opposition. 

Better Education/Sensible Taxes 
(BEST) has formed to educate the voters 
that the ACHS proposal is all "bricks and 
mortar and no education." 

"Our group isn't against more money 
for education. We dwi't even mind the $32 
million," said BEST Chairman Alan 
Knutsen. "We just don't want it all to go 
to one building. 

"This kind of expenditure just cannot 
go unquestioned." 

ACHS has scheduled a second bond 
election after a similar effort failed in 
February. The district is seeking funds to 
build a new high school that it says will 
meet the growing enrollment of the 
district. 

Estimates arc that the April referendum 
was defeated by some 200 votes. At that 
time, no formal opposition parly to the 
bonds was formed. 

"There is a silent majority that is 
opposed to new taxes and they came out 
and voted against the referendum," 
Knutsen said. 

"That was before tlic new tax bills. 
After the tax bills were passed, people just 
went up in arms. Now, with these huge 
tax increases, people can't remain silent. It 
would t»e irresponsible to remain silent." 

BEST is planning to hold a public 
meeting sometime next month to inform 
the voters that a new $32 million high 
school is unnecessary. 

BEST says that according to the 
district's own report, the old high school 
could be refurbished adequately for $8 
million. 

'The report does not back up a need 
for a new high school, Knutsen said^ "The 
report docs not indicate a need at all." 

Although the thrust of the district's 
(Continued on Page 5) 



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2 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday,Auoustl6, 1991 






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ounty 

At A 
Glance 




'I too have Jewish 
ancestors in my distant 
past...so accusing me of 
Ethnic Intimidation is 
twice as ridicuious as 
accusing anyone else.' — 
Jim Semmerling, Lake Villa 
Twp. Highway Commissioner 



Minister files suit 
against police dept. 

ROUND LAKE— A Round Lake 
minister is seeking "the truth" in an 
incident he said involved police brutality. 
Carl Bradford filed a $1 million suit in 
U.S. Federal Court against Ptimn. John 
Galford, the Round Lake Beach Police 
Department and the Village of Round 
Lake Beach. The suit called for "action for 
damages sustained by Bradford and mem- 
bers of (his) family against police officers 
of the Round Lake Beach Police Depart- 
ment." The suit states the department 
made an effort to "cover up** the actions of 
an officer after he "unlawfully arrested, 
assualled, harassed, prosecuted and 
slandered" Biadfoid. 

Local fire dept. 
assists McHenry 

ROUND LAKE— The Round Lake 
Area Fire Department was among several 
to offer ambulance assistance in a 
morning fire at Royal Terrace Nursing 
Home in McHenry. The accidental fire 
apparently began from a resident smoking 
in bed. No one was seriously injured 
however 51 people were transported to 



Lal<e[and's COUNTY NEWS 




.7 "■ 



hospitals and checked for smoke inhilation 
according to McHcnry's fure department 
No damage estimate was available though 
little fire damage was caused. The fu-e was 
contained in the room of its origination. 

Libertyville man 
dies in accident 

LIBERTYVILLE— A Libertyville 
man was pronounced dead at Condell 
Memorial Hospital early Aug. 10 
following a one vehicle accident Paul M. 
Hansen, 33, 1127 Harms, died from 
injuries after his northbound car left the 
roadway on Buiterfield, swerved back on 
the roadway, crossed the lane of oncoming 
traffic and slid off the shoulder of the 
southbound lane. According to police, 
Hansen's car struck several trees when it 
exited the roadway the second time, 
causing the roof to collapse. Hansen was 
found pinned behind the wheel under the 
collapsed roof. 

Venetian Night 
boat parade 

FOX LAKE— At least 40 decorated 
or lighted boats — double Chicago's 
famous Venetian Night boat parade — are 
due for the first ever Fox Lake Venetian 
Night boat parade at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 
Aug. 17 on the east shore of Pistakee 
Lake. Recommended vantage points are 
Eagle Point off Rie. 12 and the foot of 
Grand Ave. at the lake. The event is being 
sponsored by the U.S. Coast Guard 
Auxiliary, which will conduct a benefit 
pig roast Sunday, Aug. 18 at Watt's 
Marina, S. Rle. 12. 

LV official arrested 
over graffitied sign 

LAKE VILLA — Township 
Highway Commission Jim Semmerling 
surrendered to an arrest warrant Monday 
charging him with disorderly conduct in 
an incident that involved a sign covered 
with swastikas and Satanic symbols placed 
on a resident's driveway. Semmerling 
placed the sign on Judy Flenlge's driveway 
to cover a hole until road crews could 
repair it Flentge, who is of a Jewish 
background, filed a charge of ethnic 
imtimidation with police because 
Semmerling allegedly verbally abused her 
after placing the sign on her driveway. 
She said the commissioner is upset 
because she has persisted in trying to get 
the driveway fixed since the hole appeared 
in early June. Semmerling denies all 
charges and continues to work for the 
Township. 



Historical group 
shows Rudd home 

GURNEE— Some watched as a slide 
show featured historic schools and other 
buildings in Warren Twp. Others flipped 
though the many photo albunis and 
newspaper clippings about the restoration 
of the oldest home in Gumee. Still others 
found themselves traversing down the 
Sleep stairway to a basement where more 
than 150 years ago, as the story goes, 
slaves were kept on their way northward 
on the "Underground Railroad". The scenes 
were varied this weekend at the Mother 
Rudd Home, as the home sprung to life 
with activity — probably more people 
through the home in two days than in the 
last 50 years. A project which began when 
the village of Gumee bought the land 
reached a milestone when Warren Twp. 
Historical Society opened the Mother Rudd 
Home during Gumee Days. 

Chief heads to Fla. 
after retirement 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS— Police 
Chief John Robinson ended his last shift 
with the Round Lake Heights Department 
Aug. 9 and headed for Florida. Robinson 
announced his resignation during a com- 
mittee meeting in July. According to 
Mayor Sandra Morris who described 
Robinson as a "satisfactory" chief, 
Robinson said he was thankful to the 
community and glad to work for the Vil- 
lage. His duties were handled by the 
Mayor until further determination by the 
board on Wednesday Aug. 14. 




Spring Grove man 
accused of murder 

ANTIOCH- The 

Lake County 
Sheriffs Office 
has called the 
Federal Bureau of 
Investigation to 
help in the search 
for Burl Mason, 
31, who is sus- 
pected of stran- 
gling his neighbor. 
Susan Pauly, 38, 
was found stran- 
gled in her 
Antioch Township 
home across the street from Mason's on 
Aug. 9. Police suspect the murder 
occurred the night before. Investigators 
said Mason may have attacked Pauly from 
behind while she entered her home with an 
armload of groceries. They said he bound 
her to her bed and strangled her with an 
electric cord. Test results as to whether the 
woman was sexually assaulted were 
expected later this week. Police found duct 
tape matching that discovered on Pauly's 
stolen Chevy Blazer. The sheriffs office 
called in the FBI to help locate Mason, 
who may have fled out of state. 

Pro park group 
forms for fall vote 

GURNEE— A group of Gurnee 
residents who want to keep the park 
district j'ust the way it is has been 
organized. The park district is facing a 
dissolution question on the Nov. 5 ballot 
and those supporting dissolving the park 
district must attain a two-thirds vote. 



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lakeland Newspapers 3 



1991 



Friday. August 16, 1991 
















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Intriguing options await 
diners at Tlie Diplomat 



If the opportunity lo sample "The best 
cheesecake in Lake or McHcnry County" 
isn't intriguing enough for you, how 
about checking out the other fare from the 
in-housc bakery, the fresh fish, the stir- 
fried offerings, itic homemade salad dnss- 
ings or the over IS daily specials at The 
Diplomat? 

The Diplomat, 5572 Grand Ave. in 
Gumcc (the comer of Grand Avenue and 
Dillcys Road), is a family-style, casual- 
atmosphere restaurant with lunches 
beginning at $4.25 and dinners starting at 
$6.95. 

A gleaming fountain and etched glass 
accoutrements in the lobby and a soothing 
mauve and green scheme in the 200-seat 
restaurant portion of the establishment 
invites customers to that just-right repast 

While it's a great place for everyday 
dining and "perfect for business lunches," 



casual converts to elegant in the 300-scat 
formal banquet facility that's just waiting 
10 help you celebrate that special occa- 
sion. 

Peter Marcos and his sons, Sam and 
Chris arc entering their third year as own- 
ers of The Diplomat, but their experience 
in palate pleasing goes back 20 years. The 
Marcos family came lo Lake County from 
its Chicago restaurant business, which 
was started in 1972. 

"Fresh, quality foods and products" is 
the Marcos' hallmark. 

The Diplomat is open seven days a 
week from 6 a.m. undl 12:30 a.m. 

No reservations arc needed for drop-in 
dining, but you've got to plan ahead to 
use the banquet facility. 

Major CTcdit cards arc accepted 
CaU (708) 662-2929. 



;Mr.^ 



'q OPEIV daily XT 1 1:00 AM. 

OverCoofQn^ Meyers 'Bai/ 

"T^nl-i^ Every Soturday Prime Rib 

X <x LJ.W Every Friday & Saturday BBQ Ribs 



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Lunch • Dinner • Banquets 

iGrFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE^) 

6^^o\ 510S. Park, Fox Lake '^se^^g^ 
^ ^^ For Reservations, Call (708) 587-1 288 

^ Formerly Andres on the Bay 



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•Piano Bar Wed., Fri. & Sat. 
•DJ 10:00 PM - 2:30 AM 



Friday Fish Fry . . . '6.95 

(All You Can Eat) 

Soturdoy Night Prime Hib 

395-4550 

Rt. 173, Antioch 




Grand Ave. 
GURNEE 

J (2 Mi)«i W. 01 
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OH FRIDAYS 11-2, 

ITALIAN 

LUNCH BUFFET 

ALL YOU CAN EAT 
•3 Hot Enlrccs 
•Salad • Rolls 

$6.95 



^AUUTOS ,. 



10% OFF 



j Any Lunch Or 
I Dinner Carry 
I Out Order 

I Expires 8/24/91 



HOURS: Tua>. thru Thuri. 11 sm lo 10 pm, 
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Sun. 1 pm lo 9 pm 

Lunch Serrad Otiiy ^^ ■ A 
Closad Mondays 





Gracious dining in the Wesley Sears Country Estate 
Filet of Sole, Oscar 

Fruk fUAet UaaB 3o)i, P«d THti ud Topped 
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BANQUET FACILITIES 
For Up To ISO People 

•Weddings *Annivcrsarics m 



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Businoss Heelings 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



Driver goes out of his way for elderly riders 



'With the fast pace of today's world, the 
hustle and bustle, we sometimes forget 
the person behind the scene. Franz Baker, 
an employee of PACE, is that unique kind 
, of individual. 

Each week he brings our clients to our 
adult day care here at Victory Lakes. His 
humor, kindness, warmth and concern for 
everyone should be commended. 

He is the type of person who takes that 
extra step to see that everyone is safe and 
happy. He displays genuine concern. If 
one of our clients is absent or ill, he 
always inquires. He even stops at their 
homes to say, 'Hi.' 

On special holidays he takes time to 
decorate his bus to suit the occasion. 

He has a special way of receiving a 
smile from each client, even on rainy 
days. He is that all-around 'special person" 
— Sandra Smith, adult day, care 
coordinator for Victory Lakes in 
Lindenhurst 



by DOUG DUSIK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

"It's in my blood I guess," says Franz 
Baker, sitting in his decorated PACE van 
and waiting for his elderly riders to Hnish 
shopping at an Antioch supermarkeL 

Photos of his four grandchildren are 
attached to his visor. A cooler sits in the 
back for riders to put their frozen groceries 
into. The van is decorated with American 
flags and red, white and blue streamers. 

"This stays up for Labor Day, the 
Fourth of July and Memorial Day." he 
explains. "Then it comes down and up go 
my decorations for Halloween." 

Such effort beyond the norm is what 



BEST 



characterizes Baker and endears him to 
those who know him. 

"You won't be able to get another bus 
driver like him. He's die best," says rider 
Irene Damian of Antioch. 

Baker helps his riders load and unload 
their groceries. He greets them with a 
sincere friendliness. And he takes personal 
responsibility to ensure their safety. 

"We had gotten home late and Franz 
had already been here to drop (our mother) 
off," writes the family of Josephine 
Jiracek of Lake Villa. 

"He kept her on the bus and returned 
back to drop her off when he felt sure we 
would be there. We are so grateful for 
that. He has our complete trust and love." 

"The two things that are most apparent 
about Franz." says Paul Howard, 
coordinator at the Antioch Senior Center, 
"are one. all the seniors love him and two, 
he's reliable. 

"They love him because he has a great 
personality and because he will go out of 
his way to get them wherever. He's 
reliable because there's never a surprise. If 
something is different, he'll tell you." 

Howard says that includes the behavior 
or health of the elderly riders. If Baker 
notices that one of them is acting 
differently, he will notify the. Senior 
Center. '"' 

"He's very prompt and courteous. He 
helps you all he can. He's always 
pleasant," says rider Gilbert Poirier of 
Lake VUla. 

Perhaps the secret to Baker's success is 
that he loves his job, A courtesy van 
driver for 12 years for the O'Hare Hilton, 
he decided two years ago to be a PACE 
driver for northwest Lake County to be 



(Continued from Page 1) 
report contends that there is not enough 
room for increasing projected enrollment 
from the growing area, BEST argues that 
25 acres are immediately available. 

"There's so much wasted space," 
Knutsen said, adding that 5.3 acres of 
property next to the high school is 
available from Quaker Industries for $4 
million and 20 open acres sit right across 
campus on the other side of McMilten 
Road. 

"We're not above the school board 
changing its mind. We don't believe there 
is a right and a wrong here. We just 
believe there are some alternatives," 
Knutsen said. 

BEST would like to sec the $8 million 
used to refurbish the high school and the 
other $24 million to pay teachers and 
make improvements at the district's 
elementary schools. 

"High schools as a whole are not 



performing under the necessary standards," 
Knutsen said. 

He criticized ACHS officials for 
quickly throwing together a referendum in 
April. The district asked voters for $29 
million in bonds at the time. 

"They kind of took the spitball 
approach. 'If it sticks on the wall, we 
win.' There were very few meetings 
informing the taxpayers. They kind of just 
brought it up," he said. 

Knutsen said he thinks BEST has a 
very good case in that moving ACHS 
would have a serious economic impact on 
the area, both to the tax base and to 
merchants. 

BEST will try to get this message out 
through meetings, flyers and newspaper 
ads, the group said. The message will be 
infonmative and not inflammatory. 

"We don't have an ax to grind and were 
not trying to be obstinate," Knutsen said, 
"We're trying to be fair to ourselves, the 
taxpayers." 



Lindenhurst festival this weekend 



A parade, carnival, entertainment and 
raffles mark Lindenfest '91, running 
Thursday through Sunday in front of 
Lindenhurst Village Hall. 

Lindenfest opens at 6 p.m. Thurday and 
runs until 10 p.m. Friday's schedule runs 
from 6 p.m. to midnight Saturday, 10 
a.m. to midnight and Sudnay 10 a.m. to 9 
p.m. 

A pancake breakfast hosted by the Lake 
Villa Township Lions Club begins at 7 
a.m. on Sunday. • 



Three raffles are being held. A $1,500 
vacation to anywhere Midwest Express 

airlines serves is the top prize in one 

raffle. The Food Around raffle offers a 

shopping spree at a local shopping 

market. And the Newcomer's club is 

raffling off a Discovery toy. 

The "New Colony Six" and "The 
Shadows of Knight" arc scheduled to 
perform starting at 8 p.m. Saturday night. 



Lakeland Jlewspapers 



Lalceland (usps 027-080) 

NewBpopCTS 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1836 

Office of PubllcaJlonT 30 Souih WhHney Sl„ GrayslaKo, IL 
6O030. Phono (708) 223-818). 

PuWhhBd vwokly, iocond daw poelago paJd ai GrayBlake, 

IL 60030. 

Mall SutoCTlpllon nato*: '16.50 Pof Yoaf by MaJj^paW In 
advance In lako. CooK Konosha and M(*len7 Counties; 
elsowtieta •2aOO Per Year by Mall paid In advance. 

Po6tma»lor; Sond addioss change* to Aniloch Now- 
Repoftof, 30 South WWtnoy Stfoet. P.O. Sox 268. 
(^yaloke. llUnOs 60030. 

(708)223-8161 






Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundelein News 
Grayslake Times 
Fox Lake Press 
Gurnee Press 



Vernon Crier 

Round Lake News 

Wauconda Leader 

Ubertyvllle News 

Lindenhurst News 

Kenosha County Times 

North Chicago Tribune 

Warren-Newporl Press 



Acmiring Ugr. 



M.R. SCHRQEDER 
WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Pubtshet/Preeldont 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Otmalions Manager _ 

^UUIIXUENAftT WK II ROBERTS 

EttHortiJUgt. awtaJAVrtinjUy, 

SHARON ZASAWL ELIZABETH EBERT 

Ccr^ltnUgi. Mlc BalJiiQfis- Abating Wy, 



JIUDePASQUALE 
WOLDAYAIEUU 



closer to his home in Round Lake Beach. 

"I got a vacation coming and I have to 
take it before the end of the year, but I 
really don't care if I take it or not because 
I love my people and I love my job," he 
says. 

"I enjoy being with others. It makes 
me happy. And it makes them happy." 



'You won't be able to 
get another bus driver 
like him. He's the best' 

— Irene Damian of 
Antioch 




Sp&csBl person 



Franz Baker is a PACE driver for Antioch, Lake Villa and Lindenhurst. His elderly 
riders and their families have expressed gratitude for the way he has treated 
them over the last two years. — photo by Doug Dusik 

High school referendum 
backers organizing, too 

vote promises U) have voters better 
prepared before casting their ballots. 

"Maybe not enough information was 
given about the ncv/ high school and the 
plan for elementary schools to use the 
existing high school facility as a junior 
high," Hintz said, . 



On the other side of the Antioch 
Community High School referendum 
issue, supporters continue their efforts 
that began after the defeat of the first bond 
election in April. 

Encouraged by estimates that the fu^t 
bond issue was defeated only by some 200 
votes, a citizens committee of about 2S 
people and "upwards to a couple hundred" 
supporters in the field are preparing to 
inform the voters about the opportunity 
missed the first time around. 

"We're going to try to contact 
supporters from the last time and try to 
convince people who voted against that 
this is the most economical solution for 
the high school and the feeder districts." 
said Jim Hintz, an Antioch resident and 
co-chairman of the ACHS Citizens 
Referendum Committee. 

Though the price of the original 
referendum has gone up — the district is 
asking for $32 million in bonds instead of 
$29 million — the message still remains 
the same: a new high school is needed in 
the area for the growing enrollment in 
high school and elementary schools. 

Whereas the district admittedly may not 
have been the most informative during the 
April election, November's referendum 



To remedy this, ACHS officials 
focused right after the April defeat on the 
school boards of the elementary schools. 
That information was re-emphasized in the 
summer. 

Now the plan of attack appears to be 
the general public. The Citizens 
Referendum Committee was scheduled to 
meet Wednesday and devise a strategy to 
gain more support from taxpayers in the 
district, Hintz said. 

"We're going to review what happened 
at the last election and try to develop a 
game plan for the coming elecdon," Hintz 
said. 

The expected methods, however, will 
not shove the information down potential • 
voters' throats. Hintz said referendum 
material would be made more readily 
available than it was prior to April's vote. 

"You can't get people to read but you 
can make it available," he said. 




Ready to roll 



Racheal Larson, 4, prepares to launch her bowling ball down a lane at 
Kristol's Entertainment Center during a field trip of the Anttoch Paries and 
Recreation Department's summer day camp. Counselor Kathy Glenn stands 
behind Larson and helps her along. — photo by Doug Dusik 



uf 



Lakeland Newspapers 5 



Friday, August 16. 1991 




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30 years ago, Aug. 17, 1961 

... Lindcnhurst issued its first liquor license — $300 
for the year and $200 for succeeding years. 

... Hot lunches at Grayslake High School were 
increased a nickel, from 35 lo 40 cents. 

... A & P advertised 12 cars of com for 29 cents. 

... "Gidget Goes Hawaiian" was playing at Grayslake 
Outdoor Theater. 

... The Antioch News reported: "At exactly 2 a.m. 
Sunday, Aug. 20, Antioch will become the most 
modem community — communications wise — in 
Lake County. At that moment Antioch will not only 
convert to a dial telephone system, but to ultra-modem 
all numbers dialing." 

20 years ago, Aug. 19, 1971 

... The Lake Villa Record reported "another victory 
for women's lib" at Ray's Shell in Antioch, where an 
all-female team pumps gas while "the male help stays 
in the garage for the heavier duty." 

... Lakchurst shopping mall advertised its grand 
opening. 

... Two Lake Villa teen-agers were fined $5 and $10 
for having studded snow tires on their cars, which were 
supposed to be removed by May 1, according lo state 
law. 

... An editorial in the Antioch Reporter discussed 
Congress' decision to hike the minimum wage lo $2 an 
hour, and the protests that were coming in because of it 

15 years ago, Aug. 19, 1976 

... Aflcr three years work, the Antioch Village Board 
approved a new sign ordinance that, among other things, 
outlawed revolving and overhanging signs. 

... The Illinois Department of Transportation told the 
McHcnry County Planning Commission that a 
proposed freeway through Grayslake west to McHcnry 
and north to Wisconsin would probably not be 
completed until 1990 or later. 

... A three-bedroom home in Round Lake Park was 
advertised in the classifieds for $31,500. 

... The Gavin School Board and the Gavin Teachers 
Association had yet to settle a salary agreement. 

... Lake Villa publicly reiterated its opposition to the 
Lake Villa Library being located in Lindcnhurst 

10 years ago, Aug. 20, 1981 

... Several residents, many who lived in the Loon 
Lake area for 40 to 50 years, came out in force to 
protest the rczoning of of 3.7 acres on Rte. 83 one 
block south of Beach Grove Road as "the rampant spread 
of commercialization" in the area. 

... An Antioch man and a juvenile were arrested in 
connection with the burglary of a local restaurant that 
resulted in the theft of $60 cash and 20 to 30 steaks. 



—Engagements 



New Arrivals 



Marl Rae Garner 

A daughter, Marl Rac, was bom July 10 at CondcU Medical Center lo 
James and Tara Malusky of Winihiop Haibor, HI. Grandparents arc Brian 
and Cynda Alderton of Lake Villa, James and Mary Gamer of Wtnthrop 
Harbor. Great grandparents arc Florence Malusky of Spring Grove, Dolly 
Alderton of Lake ViUa. 

Melissa Loretta Buehler 

A daughter, Melissa Lorclta, was bom July 16 at CondcU Medical 
Center lo Robert and Maureen Buchlcr of Lindcnhurst. Grandparents arc 
Ronald and Marlcnc Zimmerman of Buffalo Grove, John and Maryann 
Buchlcr of libcrtyvillc. Great grandparents arc Arthur and Julia Miller of 
Morton Grove, Margaret Zimmerman of Chicago. 



'See me for all 
your family 
insurance needs" 



STATE FARM 



LifULFirt 



INSURANCE 

® 



Dick Witt 
395-1089 

Like a good neighbor, 
State Farm is there. 



Boudin-Autschbach 

Mr. and Mrs. DuWayne Bodin of 
Ft. Myers, Fla., and Ms. Barbara 
Stram of Brockton, Mass., announced 
the engagement of their daughter, 
Denise Boudin of Antioch, to Mark 
Autschbach, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Autschbach of Inglcside. 

The ceremony will be performed 
by Father Hanlcy of St. Peter's 
Catholic Church, Antioch on Oct. 5. 

The bride-to-be is a 1985 graduate 
of Cypress Lake High School in Ft. 
Myers and a 1986 graduate of 
Waukegan School of Cosmotology. 
She is employed as a manager for the 
In The Village Beauty Secrets Salon 
in Lake Villa. 

The groom-lo-be is a 1984 
graduate of Grant Community High 
School. He is employed as a laborer- 



Local 152 for Skokic Valley Asphalt 
in Grayslake. 

The couple plans to settle in 
Antioch. 




Denise Boudin and 
Mark Autschbach 



Geweke-Pokrywka 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Gcwckc of 
Inglcside, announce ihc engagement of 
their daughter, Michelle Gcwekc, to 
Joseph Pokrywka of Lake Villa, son 




Michelle Geweke and 
Joseph Pokrywka 



of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Pokrywka of 
Lake Villa. 

The ceremony will be performed 
by Father Hanley of St. Peter's 
Church in Antioch on Aug. 1, 1992. 

The bride-to-be is a 1988 graduate 
of Grant Community High School and 
will be a 1992 graduate of North 
Central College working towards a 
bachelor's degree in elementary 
education. She is employed as a pre- 
school teacher for Rocky Raccoon Pre- 
school in Cary. 

The groom-to-be is a 1986 
graduate of Grant Community High 
School and a 1990 graduate of 
Elmhurst College earning a bachelor's 
degree in marketing. He is employed 
as an assistant manager for Walgrccns 
in Crystal Lake. 

The couple plans to settle in 
Antioch. 



Anderson-Shepard 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Anderson 
of Antioch, announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Jennifer, to 
Kristophcr Shepard, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Shepard of Anlioch. 

The ceremony will be performed 
by Father Hanley of St. Peter's 
Catholic Church in Anlioch on Sept. 
28. 

The bride-to-be is a 1988 graduate 
of Lake Forest Academy-Ferry Hall 
and a 1991 graduate of Robert Morris 
Business College. She is employed at 
Lakes Area Advertiser in Anlioch. 

The groom-to-be is a 1986 
graduate of Antioch High School and a 
1988 graduate of Triton College in 
River Grove. He is employed at 
Raymond Chcvrolet-Oldsmobile as a 



service technician. 

The couple plans to settle in 
Antioch. 



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Jennifer Anderson and 
Kristopher Shepard 



Tag Days for CF 
on Aug. 16,17 

Local volunteers will be 
collecting money donations 
for the Cystic Fibrosis 
Foundation on Aug. 16 and 
17 between 8 a.m. and 6 
p.m. during CF Tag Day. 
Cystic fibrosis is a 
hereditary diseases that 
occurs in childhood and 
affects the pancreas and Ihe 
lungs. 



Area students 
make dean's list 

Two students from An- 
tioch have been named to 
the dean's list at Augusiana 
College in Rock Island, III. 

They are Amy L. 
Graesser, daughter of Ken- 
neth and Shirley Graesser, 
and Pamela R. Oldenburgcr, 
daughter of Marvin and 
Sharon Oldenburger. 



Golf champs 

Chuck Cermak's AU- 
Amcrican Travel Center 
clinched first place in the 
Anticoh's Tuesday Night 
Business Mens Golf League 
at Spring Valley Country 
Club. It was the fourth time 
in a row for the team, 
which has placed first or 
won the championship 
since 1986. Team members 
are Chuck Cermak, Art 
BIccke, Dave Dziki, Rollic 
Schleusencr and Tom 
Lasco. 



Awarded badge 

Pvl. 1st class Frederic 
G. Thundcrshicld has been 
awarded the Combat In- 
fanuyman Badge. The badge 
is awarded lo soldiers as- 
signed or attached lo an in- 
fantry unit that has engaged 
in active ground combat 
with an opposing force. It 
was earned for participation 
in Desert Storm. The sol- 
dier is an infantryman at 
Fort Bragg, Fayetieville, 
NC. Thundershield is the 
son of Susan B. Bellis of 
Antioch and nephew of 
Mary Harman of Vernon 
Hills. He graduated from 
Harvard High School in 
1989. 



. 




SutcFofni insufancnCoi'n.Tiios ■ MomeOlticcs' QirKiimngion, iHinrns 






CracBtond Biptlst Church, 2S6 Ida St., Antioch, ill. 
Sunday School 11:00 ara, Mom'ng Worship 11:00 a.ra, 
Sunday Evening 7flO pm Robert WiBiams, Pastor 

Rrst Church ol Christ, Scientist & Riadlng Rm., Rta. 
173 and Harden, Antiodi. Phono (70B) 395-1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 a.ni. Wednosday, 
8:00 pm 

Calvaiv'^apllst Church, 554 Paikway, Phons (70B) 395- 
3393. Sunday School, 10 a.ni Sunday Worship 11:00 
am, and 7 p.m. Pastor. Rev. Lloyd G, Moss, Jr. 

St Ignatius Episcopal, m Main St. Phone (708) 395- 
0G52. Service 7:30 am. Low Mass, 9:30 am. HJQh Mass, 
Sunday School 9:30 am. 

Antioch Evengetlcal FrM Church Tiffany Rd. Phons 
(700) 395-4117. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Sunday 
Worship 8:15 a.m. and llfiO a.m.: Children's Church 
11:00 am. Nursery both sorvioes. Awana Club, 6:30 p.m. 
Wednesday. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church, Hillslda & Rte. 59, Phone 
(708) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8:00 & 10:30 a.m. 
Church School 9:15 am., Sunday. Rev, Charles E. MiUor, 
Pastor, 

Christian Life Fellowship Assemblies ol Good Church, 
41625 Deep Lake Rd.. Antioch. IL Phono 395-8572, 

Dan Dugenske, 

This Directory Presented As A 



Sunday School (all ages) 9:00 a.m., Sunday Morning 
Worship 10:00 a.m.. Children's Church 10:00 a.m., 
Sunday Evening Worship 6:30 p.m.. Wednesday Worship 
& Children's Program 7:00 p.m., Tues. Women's 
Fellowship & Bible Study 9.-00-11:30 am. Jefl Brussaiy, 
Pastor. 

Filth Evangelical Lulheron, 1275 Main St., Phone (708) 
395-1660. Sunday Worship 8.-00 & 10:30 am. Sunday 
School, 925 ara Moa 7:00 pjn. Rev. Darald Gmen, Rov. 
Gregory Hermanson. Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 
395-1664. 

Mlllburn Congregational United Church of Christ, 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rio. 45 Phono (703) 356-5237. Sunday 
service 10:00 am. Children's program 10:00 am. Rev. 
Paul R.Meltzer, Pastor. 

Untied Ifethodltt Church of Antioch, 843 Main SL 
Phono (708) 395-1259. Summor Worship Houns 8«) 
am. & 950 am. Tho Rev. Kurt A. GamlinrPastor . 

St. Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake St.. Anlioch Phone 
(708) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & 8:00 ara, 
Sunday 6:30, 8:00, 9:30. 11:00 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. 
Saturday 5:30 p.m. Pastor Rov. Father Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Lake* Communtly Bible Cfiurch. 2320t W. 
Grass Lako Road, Andodi. Phono (708) 838-0103, Sunday 
Service 10S0 am. - 6:00 p.m. Nursery provided. Junior 
Cliurcti during moming worahip. Pastor Don Swoollng. 



Director 

Community Service By 



Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 






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Friday,AuBUstl6, 1991 






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by LIZ SCHEMHL 
(708)395-5380 

Teary Farewell 

Long-time Antioch 
resident, Marcclla Jesse, 
died on July 27. Marcella» 
who worked as secretary for 
many years in the Antioch 
Township Office prior to 
her retirement, was an ac- 
tive member of the AARP 
"All Stars" serving on their 
song committee. She also 
played with the "String 
Alongs" and danced with the 
"Arpettes" dance group. 
Marcella held office a num- 
ber of limes in the Antioch 
Chapter of AARP. She was 
also a member of the His- 
torical Society. Marcella 
will be missed by her fam- 
ily and many friends in 
AARP. Her fellow "All 
Stars" said farewell in song 
and served as the honor 
guard at her funeral. 

ACHS News 

The ACHS carpentry 
class is taking orders for 
storage sheds during the 
1991-92 school year. Two 
shed sizes are available — 
10'xl2' and 10'xl6' which 
the carpentry students will 
construct on your site. If 
you are interested in pur- 
chasing a shed from the 
class in order to give these 
students an opportunity to 
Icam by doing, contact Ken 
Kasuboski at (708)395- 
1421 to place your order. 
They really do a fine job 
and the sheds are an asset to 
any property. 



The first Parent Aware- 
ness Night for the 1991-92 
school year will be held on 
Thursday, Sept. 12 at 7 
p.m. in the ACHS Com- 
mons area. The topic for the 
program will be "Home- 
work without Tears." For 
more information contact 
Cathy Cratty at (708)395- 
1421. 

The regular meeting of 
the Board of Education is 
Thursday. Aug. 22 at 7:30 
p.m. 
Sweet Addition 

On Monday, Aug 5. I 
received a phone call from 

Hometown 
Goodies 

little three-year-old Katrina 
Brooke telling me all about 
the birth of her new little 
sister, Molly. Molly is the 
third child of Dave and Patti 
Brooke of Antioch. She was 
bom on July 26 at Lake 
Forest Hospital. She 
weighed in at 8 lbs. 9 oz. 
Now six-year-old big 
brother, Nicholas, has two 
little sisters to lake care of. 
Congratulations to all of 
you and thanks, Katrina, for 
calling with the exciting 
news. You did a fine job on 
the telephone! 
Farewell Reception 

St. Peter's Church in 
Antioch will be hosting a 
farewell reception for Prin- 
cipal, Sister Mary Roche, 



O.P. and the seventh grade 
instructor, Sister Brideen 
Keane. B.V.M. Sister Mary 
has been at St. Peter's for 
fourteen years; Sister 
Brideen for twelve years. 
The sisters will be leaving 
St. Peter's in order to enrich 
their religious training in 
Boston. All parishioners 
and friends are invited to the 
farewell reception in their 
honor on Sunday, Aug 25. 
The reception will be held 
in the social center from 5 
to 8 p.m. 

Wedding Bells 

Can Ann. Bennett, a 
former Antioch area resi- 
dent, is planning a beautiful 
fall wedding to Nicholas 
Joseph Maloof. The cere- 
mony will be performed on 
Sept 21. 1991, at St. Pius 
X Catholic Church in 
Conyers, Ga. The reception 
will be held at the Holiday 
Inn in Conyers immediately 
following the ceremony. 
Cari, all of your Antioch 
friends wish you a beautiful 
Sept. 21 and we will be 
there with you in spirit if 
not in body. 
Remember to Call 

That's right, folks, it 
was kind of a skimpy col- 
umn this week. You know 
how to remedy that. Just 
remember to call the Lizard 
with those tidbits. Till 
then, lake care and enjoy the 
last few weeks of summer 
vacation before the kids re- 
turn to the routines of 
school. 




Win a racer 

Boy Scout Troop 92 of Antioch is selling $1 raffle tickels, ttie drawing to be field 
at its spaglietti dinner Oct. 20. Ttie prize is a minl-lndy racer, shown here during 
the Uons Club barijecue at Williams Park on Aug. 4. Pictured, from left, are Ray 
Landtum, Dick Weston and l3ominic. and Gary Aeme. — photo by Ray Plum 



Troop 92 update: 

A summer of 
canoeing and 



camping, 
awards 



Majority of seats open in 
upcoming school elections 



by DOUG DUSIK 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Antioch school boards could see some 
changing of the guards this fall. 

Three school districts have a majority 
of school board seats opening in 
November's election. Most of these terms 
are for four years. 

These districts are Antioch School 
Dist. 34, Emmons School and Grass Lake 

School. 

Antioch Community High School 
only has three of its seven board seals 
opcnuig. 

Nominating petitions may or may not 
be out abready, depending on the district. 
But all petitions are due Aug. 26. 

Elections are scheduled for Nov. 5. 

A few board members officially have 
announced they will not seek re-election. 

The rest will be known when petitions 
are due in more than a week. 

What follows is a list of local school 
districts, the board seats opening, the term 
of the open seat and whether or not any 
members have announced officially the 
decision not to run again. 
Antioch School Dist, 34 

Four seats are opening. One is for two 
years, the remaining three are for four 
years each. The district said none of its 
board members have denied seeking re- 
election. 



Opening seats for four-year terms are 
Fred Eichhom, Gail Heath and Kathiyn 
Oddsen. Tlic expiring two-year term is for 
Glenn Amundsen. 

Antioch Community High 
School 

Three four-year terms expire in 
November. None of the board members 
have announced that they will not seek re- 
election, district officials said. 

Scats arc opening for Laurel Dahl, Jan 
Ranney and Frank Walsh Jr. 

Emmons School 

Four terms expire. Three are for four 
years, one is for two years. Board member 
Pam Pierson, whose four-year seat is 
opening, has announced she will not run 
for re-election. 

The remaining members and their 
expiring terms arc: Deborah Diemer, two 
years; Bruce Dille, four years; and John 
Pelkus, four years. 

Grass Lake School 

Three four-year scats and one two-year 
scat are opening. None of the board 
members have announced they will not 
seek re-election. 

Opening for a two-year term is Don 
Scchmcr's seat. Expiring four-year seats 
belong to Marie Brausam, Donald Grob 
and Aidecn Harris. 



Float, booth mark Girl Scout 
preparations for Lindenfest 



The girls from Illinois Prairie Giri 
Scouts Service Unit 717 this week were 
busy preparing for the Lindenfest Parade 

on Saturday. 

More than 120 Girl Scouts and leaders 
from 28 troops were expected to 
participate. 

Supporting the overall patriotic theme 
of Lindenfest '91. the Girl Scouts planned 
to wear pa triotic T-shirts and sailor hats. 

Friday. August 16, 1991 



Their theme: "Giri Scouts Love the 
U.S.A." 

All week, the girls have been busy 
building their first Lindendfest parade 
float. Measuring 20 feet long, the float is 
highlighted by a 8- by 12-foot American 
flag. 

Anyone interested in becoming a Girl 
Scout or a Boy Scout can find out how at 
the Girl Scout Booth set up at Lindenfest. 



Scouts from Antioch's Boy Scouts of 
America Troop 92 worked hard during a 
one-week summer campout at Camp 
Owasippe, Mich. One of America's largest 
scout reservations, the camp is located 
north of Muskegon near Whitehall and 
provides a wealth of opportunities for 
scouts to acquire knowledge and skills in 
the outdoors, obtain individual and team 
leadership experience and have lots of fun. 
Six scouts collectively earned 24 merit 
badges in camping, orienteering, pioneer- 
ing, wood carving, archery, canoeing, 
lifesaving, environmental science, fish and 
wildlife, nature and soil and water conser- 
vation. The boys who attended included 
Eric Burgess. Geoff Landrum, Jcrcmic 
Pederson, Mike Reese, Chris Sittler and 
Steve Weston. They were led by Ray 
Landrum, Jim Ratajczyk and Mike Reese 
Sr, who won the Black Powder shooting 
contest Troop 92 earned the Baden Powell 
award for improving and maintaining the 
campsite. 

A week later 21 troop members and 
guests headed for northern Wisconsin to 
continue their summer camping program. 
On the way, several scouts and leaders 
visited Camp Makajawan Scout Reserva- 
tion near Antigo, Wise, to attend the 
semi-annual Order of Arrow ceremony. 
The Order of Arrow is awarded to those 
scouts who have made significant progress 
in advancement and to selected troop lead- 
ers. Scouts Geoff Landrum, Chris Sillier 
and Steve Weston and Asst. Scoutmaster 
Ray Landrum were "tappcd-out" to com- 
plete the day-long ordeal and subsequently 
receive the coveted Order of Arrow Award. 
The main event of summer for Troop 
92 was a wonderful week-long, 70-miIc 
canoe trip on the beautiful Namekagan 
River between Hayward and Riverside 
Landing near Danbury, Wise. The river is 
part of the Saint Croix National Scenic 
Waterway. The weaUicr was beautiful, rain 
was infrequent and camp sites were rela- 
tively primitive. The group received fre- 
quent and memorable practical instruction 
in the discernment of poisonous plants. 
They enjoyed camping, swimming, fish- 
ing and observing such wildlife as otter, 
deer, raccoon, weasel, bald eagle, red tail 
hawk, osprey, beaver, belted kingfisher 
and assorted turtles, ducks and other fowl. 
Scouts who attended included Eric 
Burgess, Eric Francke, John Harling, Ge- 
off Landrum, Brian Paschke, Jcrcmic Ped- 
ereon, Chris Sittler, John Thelcn and Dan 
and Steve Weston. Guests included Aus- 
tralian Rotary Exchange" student and 



Mark your calender 
for the 31st annual 
Troop 92 spaghetti 
dinner at the Moose 
Lodge on Sunday, Oct, 
20 Troop 92 meets at 
the Antioch Scout 
House on Tuesday 

evenings from 7 to 9 
p.m. For information 
contact Scoutmaster 
Disk Weston at 356- 
9269, Troop 92 is 
sponsored by Antioch's 
Loyal Order of Moose 
Lodge 525, 

Queen Scout Leigh Pritchard, Emily 
Harling and Jessica Thelen. The scout 
leaders were Bob Brown, Dave Edwards, 
Steve Goctzclman, Commiitcc Chairman 
Ray Harting, Ray Landrum, Jack Thclen, 
Dave Weston and Scoutmaster Dick We- 
ston. Finally, the dog Rascal added canine 
color to the group's adventures. 

Earlier in the year. Troop 92 scouts 
achieved honors in three events. Troop 92 
patrols once again won first and second 
place in the Lakes Dist. Klondike Derby, 
which consisted of a variety of winter 
survival problems and events. Troop 92 
patrols also took first and second place 
again in the Lakes Dist. First Aid Meet, 
which required scouts to diagnose and treat 
several real-life first-aid problems. Fi- 
nally, the troop 92 float won overall first 
place in Antioch's July 4 parade. Their 
float depicted scouts rowing canoes and 
crossing a rope bridge. 

Troop 92 is pleased to acknowledge 
those advanced scouts who have served in 
special leadership positions this summer. 
John Harting and Brian Paschke were se- 
lected by Lakes Dist. to join 200 scouts 
from across the nation for one week of 
National Junior Leadership Training at 
Philmont, the national scout ranch located 
in Cimarron, N.Mcx. Gene Brown was 
nominated for staff of the annual North- 
eastern Illinois Council Junior Leadership 
Trmning session. Subsequently, he joined 
the Camp Makajawan summer camp staff, 
where he has served as counselor since 
June. 



:l . 



Lakeland Newspapers 7 



Tax cap no game for park 4yitrict officials 



Land acquisitions , services to suffer 



by DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 
Lakeland Newspapers 
. The level of services provided by park 
districts could begin to degenerate Oct 1 
when the tax cap for collar counties 
around Cook goes into effect, according to 
area officials. 

Property values are said to slowly 
decline when a community's growth 
exceeds a program's ability to offer home 
buyers the type of recreational services, 



7 think if we're not 
careful, we're going to. 
see the collar counties 
look a little like Dis- 
neyland with every- 
thing fee-based' — 
Peter Murphy, general 
counsel, Illinois Asso- 
ciation of Park Districts 

open space and schools they are seeking. 

- More land could also become available 
for developers to purchase and build upon 
because they no longer have to compete 
with park districts, forest preserves, cities, 
villages and conservation districts trying 
to acquire it for open space. 

Park districts in Lake, McHenry, 
DuPagc, Will and Kane counties will have 
less operating revenue because non- 
referendum property tax increases are 
limited to S percent or the cost of living 
index - whichever is lower. 

Alex Marx, Mundelcin Park District 
director, said the law, known as Senate 
Bill 1378, is unconstitutional because it 
doesn't apply throughout Illinois. "It- 
crcates a separate class of people within 
the stale. The level of services that those 

communities will be able to provide will 
be less than what counties outside the 
collar will be able to provide," he said. 
' "That certainly is the effect of Utc bill," 
said Carl Hartmann, Vernon Hills Park 
District director, "but I don't know that 
makes it unconstitutional." 

Marx argued the law prohibits the collar 
counties from raising the money to 
qualify them for 50-50 matching grants 
from the slate. "Should we ever want to 
apply for a matching grant, we won't be 
able to come up with our share, so we 
won't be able to apply for the grants," he 
said. 

"Agencies, park districts, whatever 

Strangled 

(Continued from Page 1) 

door, as investigators have theorized. 

The Lake County Coroner's Offlce said 
an autopsy revealed that Pauly was 
strangled. Tests to see if she was sexually 
assaulted were performed and the results 
were expected back later this week. 

The sheriffs office said they believe 
Pauly and Mason were nothing more than 
casual acquaintcnces. 

But this casual acquaintence, according 
to neighbors, would sit in a wheelchair 
and stare at the home across the street. 
The wheelchair, however, was unncccsary 

— a show, they said. Mason would fold 
up the chair when he was done and walk 
back inside. 

He had only been out of an Illinois 
state prison two weeks when he allegedly 
murdered the woman across the street 

Mason was released July 26 from Hill 
Correctional Center in Galcsburg. He was 
serving time after pleading guilty in 1988 
to charges that he tried to break into a 
Uuck in Lake County. 

The sentence was for six years. 
Corrections officials have reportedly said 
he was released early on good behavior. 

Police have described Mason as a 
"career criminal," having spent most of 
the 1980s in prison. He has been 
sentenced to a ten-year term for armed 
violence and home invasion in McHcnry 
County and three years for burglary. 



would have to take that money out of 
their operating fund, which they probably 
couldn't afford to do. It may delay or even 
eliminate developing parks," said Randy 
Rcopelle, outgoing director of recreation 
in Lake Zurich and incoming Park District 
director in Wauconda, 

"Either the state could change its factors 
for the five counties involved in the tax 
cap or go to a 90-10 split instead of a SO- 
SO split. If they don't do that, the five 
collar counties will be left out in the cold 
as far as state grants are concerned," Marx 
said. 

Outgoing Wauconda Park District 
Director Caroline Thacker, speaking as a 
resident, wondered how park districts could 
approach voters to ask them to approve 
issuing bonds for a grant which had not 
been obtained. 

When asked about the law's impact in 
Wauconda, Park District President Kathy 
. Lcrsch said, "None of us really know what 
type of impact there .will be. I don't think 
the wording of a referendum to secure a 
matching grant is an issue with us." ■ 

Park districts arc independent taxing 
bodies. Village recreation departments are 
funded by their municipalities. Lake 
Zurich Village AdminisU^lor Scott Ratter 
said the village has not issued bonds for 
park development in the year he has been 
there. Funding for village recreation 
. departments comes from general revenue, 
he said." 

In lieu of the tax cap, Ron. Lorenzo, 
director of parks and recreation for 
Libcrtyville, did not hold out much hope 
of proceeding with the second phase of the . 
Adicr pool rennovation project. The 
village recently broke ground oh the first 
phase which will cost $1.8 million. The 
final or second phase will cost between 
$500,000 and $1 million to complete. 
General obligation bonds were issued to 
fund the first phase. 

The new law's restrictions docs, 
however, include allowing public bodies 
that arc not home rule municipalities in 
the collar counties to levy taxes above the 
cap to pay off existing debt, according to 
Bob Kohn, an attorney for the Wauconda 
Park District. 

"If a park district wants to issiic bonds, 
they can do it without a referendum to pay 
off principal and interest," on debt that 
was incurred prior to Oct. 1, 1991, he 
said. 

Part of officials' concern is that the 
legislature capped funds park districts have 
no control over, such as the rising cost of 



insurance. Marx said the glitch initially 
was not included in the law. 

Peter Murphy, general counsel for the 
Illinois Association of Park Districts in 
Springfield, said, "I think if we're not 
careful, we're going to sec the collar 
counties look a lilde like Disneyland with 
everything fee-based. People arc willing to 
pay for their own recreational pursuits, 
but not somebody else's and that's 
unfortunate. Park districts arc only 5 to 6 
percent of the local properly tax bill." 

Hartmann said Vernon Hills residents 
will see a reduction in their park district 
taxes by nearly a third as a result of the 
law. The village will levy only 24.6 cents 
per $100 of assessed valuation this yeair in 
contrast to last year's 40 cents. A resident 
who paid $300 to the park district last 
year will pay only $223. next year, 
Hartmann said, Overall, residents in the 
collar counties are expected to pay a total 
of $4 million less in property taxes next 



year due to the law, said Robert Depke, 
Lake County Board president and Warren 
Township supervisor. 

Murphy said the law is particularly 
detrimental to young park districts such as 
Vemon Hills, which was formed in 1973 
but began functioning in 1976 acconling 
to Hartmann. "Vemon Hills has gone 
from 1,000 people 30 years ago to 15,000 
now," he said. "As we get new open 
space, raw land, it is expected for us to 
put in ball fields, playgrounds, picnic 
areas, in other words, develop parks and 
playgrounds. The money used for that 
development has now been taken away by 
■ this bill." he said. 

To protect open space, Mundelein 
officials arc asking developers to donate 
land and pay for its improvement for the 
privilege of annexing into the 
community. "The cap is. creating a real 
bureaucracy for somebody to deal with," 
Marx said. 



Police suspected Mason in last week's 
Spring Grove murder after reports surfaced 
that he was seen leaving the area in 
Pauly's stolen silver Chevrolet Blazer. 

Stereo speakers and the Blazer, with 
license plate SLP 159, were the only 
items discovered missing in the victim's 
home. 

Armed with a search warrant, 
investigators said they found duct tape that 
matched tape found on Pauly's bed. Police 
suspect Mason removed the tape rcstrainls 
from Pauly's body after he strangled her. 

By the middle of the week, the search 
was on for Mason. Chicago newspapers 
and television carried the story, which 
included photos of the suspect 

Mason is described by police as 6 feet, 
1 inch tall, 160 pounds, with thinning 
brown hair and a brown moustache. He 
may or may not walk with the assistance 
of a cane or walker. 

One story reported that a man fitting 
the description was spotted iii a bar in 
southwest suburban Plainfield. The story 
said the man put down a beer and quickly 
left the lavem after photos of Mason were 
aired on the news. 

The man reportedly left the bar in a 
small white Dodge. 

In the meantime, the Lake County 
Sheriffs Office requested the services of 
the FBI to help locate Mason, who may 
have ficd from the stale. 




Gaffrig takes it home 



Joseph Gaffrig of Antioch drove home in this new 1 992 GMC pickup truck, 
raffled off by the Antioch Lions Club during Its chicken barbecue In Williams 
Park on Aug. 4. Proceeds from the truck raffle will be used to buy a new 
diesel truck chassis for the Antioch Volunteer Rescue Squad. — photo by 
Ray Plum 



Lake Villa schools issue $2.1 million in bonds 

Lake Villa School Dist. were included in a 10-cent for life-safety repairs and 

41 is issuing $2.1 million school tax, but the Illinois general obligations up 

in bonds to pay for its General Assembly's 5-per- 

Life/Safety Fund and create cent tax cap has changed 

a Working Cash Fund. that, Palombi said. 

Superintendent Peter Palombi said the board 

issued $2.1 million in 



Palombi said the board's 
decision is a direct result of 
the state legislature's tax 
cap, approved last month. 

DisL 41 is issuing $1.5 
million in bonds to create a 
Working Cash Fund for 
general obligation expenses; 
the remaining $600,000 
will be used to pay state- 
mandated life/safety rcpau^. 

Both accounts previously 



LEGAL NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given by 
the Board of Education of 
School District 36 in Lal<e 
County, lllinots that the 
tentative budget (or the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1991 will be on file and 
available for public 
inspection at the Grass 
Lal<e School office at 26177 
W. Grass Lake Road, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 from 
and after 9:00 a.m. on the 
9th day of August 1991. 

Notice Is further liereby 
given that a public hearing 
on said budget will be held 
at 7:00 p.m. on the ICIh day 
of September 1991 at 
Grass Lake School. 

Dated this 8th day of 
August, 1991, Board of 
Education, School District 
36 in the County of Lake, 
State of Illinois. 
Marie Brausam 
Secretary 

891C-905-AR 
Aug. 16, 1991 



front 

This will prevent the 
district from getting 
strapped should the legisla- 
ture further impair use of 



bonds to get all the money tax monies, he said. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Legal Notice of Public Hearing 
Zoning Board of Appeals 

On Wednesday, September 4, 1991 at 7:30 p.m. In 
the Antioch Village Hall, 874 Main Street, Antioch, 
Illinois 60002, the Zoning Board of Appeals will hear the 
following petition: 
Petitioner: James E. Morgan 

Petition: Request is to change from B-3 zoning to R-5 
zoning with a variance of lot size to 68'0' width in lieu of 
75'0". 

LEGAL DESCRIPTION: That part of the West half of the 
North East quarter of Section 0. Township 46 North, 
Range 10, East of the 3rd P.M., described as follows to- 
wit: Commencing at the point of intersection of the 
Southerly extension of the East line of Wallace E. 
Drom's Subdivision with a line drawn parallel to the 
North line of the said West half of the North East quarter 
of said Section 8 and 445.0 feet South therefrom 
(measurered along the East line of the said half quarter 
Section); thence South along the said Southerly 
extension of the East line of Wallace E. Drom's 
Subdivision, 136.0 feet to a point; thence East parallel 
with the North line of the West half of the North East 
quarter, aforesaid, 374.1 feet; thence North, parallel to 
the Southeriy extension of the East line of said Wallace 
E, Drom's Subdivision 136.0 feet; thence West parallel 
with the North line of said half quarter Section, 374.1 
feet to the place of beginning, in Lake County, Illinois. 
This property is the lot contiguous on the south side of 
588 Anita between Drom's Court and Anita. 

All persons desiring to appear and be heard thereon 
for or against said petition may appear at said petition 
may appear at said Hearing and be heard, 

Ed Koziorowski 

Chaimnan 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Village of Antioch 

891C-904-AR 

Aug. 16, 1991 



ifi I. 



m 



B Lakeland Nowspap«rs 



Friday, August 16. 1991 















Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



Family Night Fun 





Kristofs Entertainment Center and World of Fun in Round Lake 
Beach and Lakeland Newspapers got together to provide the 
community with some tree recreation during Monday's Family 
Fun Night. Coupons for free mlnuature golf, bowling and go- 
carting were featured In Lakeland Newpapers. but those are jusl 
some of the attractions offered at Kristofs. Clockwise from the 
left. Brian Blackards, GIna Gallo, Julie Blackards and Jante 
Biackards of Round Lake Beach pit their skill; Julieanne Kriens of 
Antioch putts around; Lakeland's Liz Ebert and Karen 
Schroeder welcome some guests to the festivities; and Carol 
and Brad Biyan of LIbertyville duel at air hockey. — Pliotos by 
Eugene Gabry 






YCC completes Ryerson Conservation Area projects 



Youth Conservation 
Corps (YCC) workers 
completed two months of 
trial improvements at the 
Ryerson Conservation Area 
in Decrfield. 

Watching as YCC'crs put 
the finishing touches on the 
last of three bridges con- 
sUiicted this summer were 
Lake County Forest Pre- 
serve President Andrea S. 
Moore (Dist. 5-Liber- 
tyville), YCC Advisory 
Committee Chairperson and 
Tenneco Corp. executive 
Barbara Posner, Lake 
County Forest Preserve 
Commissioner and Friends 
of Ryerson Woods Board 
Member Edna J. Schadc 
(Dist. 1-Dccrficld)» and 
Friends of Ryerson Woods 



Board Member Susan 
Spears. 

The YCC crew built 
wooden bridges and board- 
walks of 70, 90, and 120 
feet in length over su-eams 
and seasonally muddy areas 
in llic preserve. Two of the 
bridges are a section of a 
nature trail used for highly 
popular maple syruping 



programs in the spring. The 
Ryerson Conservation Area 
is the Lake County Forest 
Preserve Environmental 
Education Center. 

"The YCC'ers did a great 
job consU'uction bridges to 
cover areas of our uails that 
are very muddy in the 
spring," said Moore. "Their 
handiwork should make it 



safer and easier for thou- 
sands of school children and 
other visitors to enjoy our 
programs without damage 
to the natural areas at Ryer- 
son Woods." 

The Friends of Ryerson 
Woods, an organization 
dedicated to supporting en- 
vironmental education and 
nature preservation at the 



Conservation Area, awarded 
$1,500 to help support the 
YCC crew at Ryerson 
Woods, 



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NEWS 1 220 



1 



brings you: j^^ j^^lK OF LAKE COUNTY 

LAKE COUNTY CARAVAN 



...all summer long 

sponsored by: 



Stop by and see us 

Sunday, Aug. 18 
Lindenfest 1-3 p.m. 




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WATCH FOR US! 



NETWORK 



PUBUC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

Village of Fox Lake 

301 S. Route 59 
Fox Lake, IL 60020 
Sealed bids will be 
received in the office of 
the Village Clerk, 301 S. 
Route 59, Fox Lake, 
Illinois, 60020, until 2:00 
pm on August 27, 1991 
for cleaning, caulking and 
painting at the Community 
Center. 

Mark the envelope, 'Bid 
for Cleaning, Caulking 
and Painting at the 
Community Center". 

Specifications miay be 
picked up at the Fox Lake 
Village Hall. 

Bids will t>e open at 2:00 
pm on August 27, 1991 at 
2:00 pm in the council 
chambers of the Fox Lake 
Village Hall , 301 S. Route 
59, Fox Lake, IL 60020. 

The right is reserved by 

the Village of Fox Lake to 

reject any or all proposals. 

Susan J. McNally 

village Clerk 

891C-895-GEN 

August 16, 1991 



NOTICE FOR BIDS 

Notice is hereby given 
that sealed bids will be 
received by the Board of 
Trustees of the Village of 
Antioch for the Anita 
Avenue Park parking lot - 
approximately 770 LF. B- 
6.12 Concrete Curb and 
Gutter. All excavation and 
backfill to be done by 
others. Note; Final amount 
to be determined by unit 
price of quantities 
measured in place. For 
more information, call 
Joseph Huber. 

Commissioner of Streets, 
at (708)395-1881. 

Bids shall be addressed 
to Candi L. Olsen, Village 
Clerk of the Village of 
Antioch, 874 Main Street, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 and 
shall be in her hands on or 
before 7:30 p.m.. August 
26,1991. 

The Board of Trustees 
reserves the right to reject 
any and all bids, to waive 
any infonnalities in any bid, 
and to accept any 
considered advantage to 
the Village of Antioch. 

This advertisement is 
made pursuant to the 
direction of the Board of 
Trustees of the Village of 
Antioch on the 5th day of 
August, 1991. 



'Candi L Olson 

Village Clerk 

Village of Antioch 

891C-909-Gen 

August 16, 1991 



FrIday.Augusf 16, 1991 



Lakeland Nowspapers 9 



Party of taxation 



Lakeland's EDITORIAL 




t 



Lake County Board Chairman Robert 
Depkc was right, of course, in scuttling 
his $50 million bond program for more 
courtrooms and public buildings. The 
plan was hit by a blizzard of public 
protests. Despite his critics, Depke is 
unchallenged at counting votes. He knew 
when to back off. 

Prospects of possible new taxes brought 
forth a variety of ideas for coping with 
crowded court conditions. One of them 
seemed to make a lot of sense. Night 
court. Expanding the court day to handle 
the growing case load should be given 



serious consideration immediately. 

Statewide, the race of elected officials to 
beat the new Oct. 1 five percent tax cap 
looks like the start of the Boston 
Marathon. Every successful endeavor will 
be that much more dilution of Gov, Jim 
Edgar's tax relief. Democrats, by the way, 
haven't overlooked the fact that most of 
the rush for taxes has been in the collar 
counties controlled by the Republicans. 
Real estate taxes arc the total purview of 
local governments. 

Have Republicans supplanted Democrats 
as the "tax and spend" party? 




Wrong about growth 



Another municipality has hopped on the 
impact fee bandwagon. Wauconda 
approved a schedule of impact fees that 
could total as much as $4,750 for a new 
four-bedroom home. 

Like many other impact fee schedules, 
the Wauconda program was pauemcd after 
NapcrviUe in DuPage County where it all 
started. Wauconda officials feel their 
impact fee requirement is Lake County's 
most comprehensive impact fee plan, 
which is another way of saying the most 
expensive. 

Wauconda will distribute the fees, paid 
by builders to bridge the lime when infra- 
structure costs are incurred until first taxes 
are collected, to schools, libraries, parks, 
sU'ccls and sewer projects. 

Moving ever so slowly, the county is 



headed in the direction of imposing a 
highway impact fee that would add $499 
to the cost of a home built in 
unincorporated parts of the county. The 
disparity in the Wauconda and county fees 
illustrates one of the problems of 
imposing impact fees, the wide difference 
of opinion on what is considered fair. 

In reality, the fees never cover all the 
costs heaped on the public when a new 
home is built, particularly a home with 
children. Even when hefty impact fees are 
levied, existing taxpayers still wind up 
subsidizing new homes being built. 
That's the rub. And still there are so 
many elected officials who feel that die 
salvation of the local budget is more 
growth and development. How wrong they 
arc! 



Letters to the Editor 



*Buying' the county 

Editor: 

We note that some in the Lake County 
Board and the Lake County Forest 
District propose to try and beat out a 
Slate Assembly provision, deadline of 
Oct. 1, that increases of over 5 percent 
cannot be made in one period without a 
referendum. This is pure arrogance. 

The provision was put in there for the 
protection of our people. By what right 
do they think they can keep on spending 
very large amounts of somebody else's 
money for capital expenses without 
refcrendums? 

The Forest Preserve DisUict has spent 
S67 million in two years on prodigal 
acquisitions and has $13 million left. 
What do they need more for? Are ihcy 
trying to buy up the whole county? Who 
will pay the taxes? 

They don't need any more money, and 
the taxpayers in Lake County, as in every 
other county, are struggling to pay the 
taxes they have now in these depression 
times. 

E.S.Powell 
Barrington 

Fighting nature 

Editor: 

I have difficulty understanding why 
people continue to spread toxic materials 
and other harmful chemicals on their 
lawns in the face of overwhelming 
evidence that it is harmful to our 
environment 

What price a Hltle patch, of pristine 
green lawn? Is it worth fouling up our 
streams with phosphorous Uicreby killing 
water plants and fish? Is it worth high 
niunie levels in our drinking water which 
have been linked to Blue-baby 
syndrome? Is it worth crippling and 
killing our beautiful bird species? 

In many ways, wc arc working at 
cross-purposes with nature. For instance, 
pesticides kill earthworms which 
normally, have a positive role in lurf 
development. Eliminating clover robs 
our lawns of a natural source of nitrogen. 
Pels and children have also been affected 
by pesticides. 

Bob Kollman 
Gurncc 



School impact fees low 

Editor 

I commend you for your editorial of 
July 19. 

Municipal bodies when considering 
annexations for development usually look 
at conuibutions for sU"cets, water, sewer, 
lift stations, parks and other infrasUaicture 
improvements but do not get into in- 
creased existing taxpayer real payments for 
school educational and space requirements 
caused by the development's larger student 
population. 

School impact fees now charged arc 
simply too low for the new students who 
are placed into the educational system. 
Not only should the present school con- 
tribution charges be increased to reficct 
actual costs before the owners of new 
homes pay their true amounts, but conuri- 
bulions should be required for educational 
space (a new school building) whether this 
amount is $5,000. $10,000 or $15,000 
per dwelling unit so that the development 
pays its own way. Past experience in 
School District 118 shows that voters do 
not wish to pay this cost. 

The school board should reach a 
realistic figure as to education^ and new 
building costs, present it to the village 
board and insist ihat the developer pay it 

As you point out in the editorial, the 
Roney Farm annexation will involve 
more than one school district, then all 
districts should meet together and deter- 
mine their costs and present them to the 
annexing body whether it be the village of 
Wauconda or another municipal city 
interested in this annexation. 

Developers only enter a community to 
make a profit - that is the American way, 
but wc should and must require ihem to 
pay all of tlie additional expenses the de- 
velopment contributes to tlie community. 

Kenneth A. Poller 
Wauconda 
Editor's note: Kenneth Potter is a 
former village president of Wau- 
conda. 

Impact fees overdue 

Editor 

The proposed Lake County road im- 
provement impact fee ordinance is long 
overdue and should be approved quickly. 
Traffic problems arc growing worse which 
(Continued on next page) 



Coach Brown's 
ties to county 
sparked career 

by BILL SCHROEDER 

Legendary football coach Paul Brown 
had strong, but brief lies to Lake County 
that went largely unrcmembered in the 
outpouring of eulogies that marked his 
funeral last week in MassiUon, Ohio, 
where he first won acclaim. 

During Worid War II, as a young Navy 
officer Brown coached the talent-laden 
Great Lakes Naval Training Center eleven 
for two seasons. With a rosier loaded 
with college stars that made Great Lakes 
an Ail-American team, Brown, as usual, 
won everything in sight. His most feared 
weapon was a line-crashing fullback, Emil 
"Six Yards" Sitko, who donned Navy blue 
after success at No\iq Dame. 

Brown's greatest player was Otto 
Graham of Waukegan, whose success as a 
professional solidified Brown's place as a 
football immortal. 

Brown never talked about iu but it is a 
virtual certainty that the tight-lipped coach 
formulated the framework for his 
establishment of the Cleveland Browns 
while coaching at Great Lakes, his first 
experience with oulst^ding players from 
across the nation. The marvelous Navy 
players whetted his appetite for perfection. 

As a teenager, I have vivid memories of 
hearing Coach Brown speak at a FaUicr 
and Son banquet at Libcrtyville 
Presbyterian Church during the war years, 
sitting enthralled as the balding gridiron 
guru outlined his Uieories on football. I 
don't remember a thing he said, but I sure 
remember how he spoke. Humoriess, 
dead serious, captivating style. It was 
interesting to read how Paul Brown never 
really changed in his approach to life and 
football oullincd that night nearly 50 
years ago. 




In those days, when football still was 
played for fun and a way of demonstrating 
manhood, coaches came off usually as 
fun-loving guys or baffoons. Paul Brown 
was totally different He just might have 
been the guy who turned football from a 
game into a business. 

4k> 4^ ^ ^ #« 

CORRECTION— We stand corrected 
on a fact coming across the news desk. 
Gavin School's 15-month-old teacher 
conUact negotiation is not the longest in 
Lake County history. That distincdon 
belongs to Winthrop Harbor where it took 
five years to sclUe teacher salary 
differences before a state bargaining law 
was enacted in 1983. 

9. Jf. J>^ tf. Jf. ^^ J^ 

NOT FOR SALE— 

Environmentalists can brcalh easier and 
politicians and developers can gnash their- 
teeth dial one of the county's prime open 
space areas is not for sale. 

Bill Malhis, director of Camp Duncan 
YMCA, confirmed Oiat the 385 acre 
layout of virgin hardwoods located on 
Fish Lake near Volo is a major key in the 
Y's long range plan to provide top grade 
camping facilities for the North Shore and 
environs. A total of $350,000 is being 
invested in camping upgrades to make 
certain that Camp Duncan is a fixture. 

Resident campers number between 80 
and 95 for regular sessions and Camp 
Duncan has a day camp attended by 120 
youngsters. So the only noise you hear is 
the laughter of children, not the rumble of 
bulldozers. 



Madigan plays politics, 
avoids state's problems 



by THOMAS HILL 

I read in the paper Speaker Madigan's 
comment on how to eliminate the over- 
time session in the future by getting rid of 
the per diem. As someone who was in- 
terning for the House of Representatives 
from June 3 to July 19, 1 can state that no 
representative that. I talked to, on either 
side of the aisle, was down there just to 
collect the per diem. 

A significant percentage of the mem- 
bers of the House are professionals who 
would have made more Uian $77 a day if 
they were back home. To suggest that 
these professionals were trying to milk 
more money out of the state is ridiculous. 

In fact, more of the representatives 
commented daily on how badly they 
wanted to get back home. One represcnU- 
live in particular, because of his leadership 
role, had not seen his wife and ihree 
young children in over a month. 

If Speaker Madigan was that interested 
in keeping the per diem costs to the state 
down, he should have only called the 
House into session when there was im- 
portant work to be done. Instead he called 
the House into order for hours at a time 
widioul even discussing a single bill! On 
other occasions wc were in session for 
very short periods of time. In fact, one 
day's session lasted only 12 minutes 
(plenty of time to collect the per diem). 
Since the speaker has the power lo call the 
House into session he should not have 
done so under those circumstances. 

Clearly he was interested only in fur- 
thering his own political agenda. He was 
dealing with what he Uiought was a rather 
weak, first-term Governor. Instead of 



10 Lakeland Newspapere 



folding over, however, Governor Edgar 
stood fimi on his campaign promises and 
would not give into the Democrats' plans. 
The two biggest sticking points were 
the surcharge and property tax relief. 
Speaker Madigan only wanted the sur- 
charge to be temporary in order to provide 
a campaign issue for die 1992 election. 
He decided Uiat it was more important to 
play petty politics Uian to ensure funding 

Commentary 

for schools. The second major issue was 
properly tax relief. The Speaker was ada- 
mantly opposed to any form of relief for 
the collar counties and the rest of Uic 
slate. Perhaps a Chicago homeowner wiUi 
his level of income does not need relief, 
but die middle class and elderly residents 
in Uic rest of Uie state surely do. We have 
received numerous calls in the office from 
people who said that if their property 
taxes went up they would have to move. 
When people in diis stale might be forced 
to move from Uieir homes because of 
skyrocketing property tax bills, it is clear- 
ly time for something more than relief! 
The Speaker, however, chose lo play poli- 
tics instead of looking after the interests 
of all of Illinois. 

Editor's note: Thomas Hill is in 
his third stint as an intern in the 
Prairie View district office of 
State Rep. William Peterson (R- 
Buffalo Grove). A resident of Lin- 
colnshire, he will be a senior at 
Lake Forest College this fall, ma- 
joring in political science and 
economics. 



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Friday, August 16, 1991. 




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Politically Speaking 



by JOSEPH SOULAK 

Lakeland Newspapers 



NO BALONEY 

School hot lunch prices this fall will 
be in the $ 1 .35-$ 1 .40 range. 

Every school, it seems, has raised 
them a nickle or 10 cents. Antioch and 
Grayslake have done so in this part of 
Illinois. Wilmot and Westosha have done 
the same in Wisconsin. Grade schools on 
both sides of the state line are following 
suit. 

Grant is thinking about it So is Lake 
Villa grade. Blame shrinking government 
surpluses like dried milk, cheese, butter, 
beans, etc. 

One school where prices won't change 
is Gavin in Fox Lake. The $1 per-plate 
price will be the same as last year. It's a 
break-even proposition, said Supt. 
Mike Maloney without any baloney. 

Besides, its in the best interests of the 
district to keep prices low, he said. Labor 
costs remain the same regardless of how 
many students buy a hot lunch. 

OOCOQ C OOCCiOOOOOOCCOOCOOOQOOOO 

FAVORI TE TARGET 

Street light standards are a favorite tar- 

Letters 

(Continued from preceding page) 

will only be further aggravated by contin- 
ued development 

The disparity for restaurants is some- 
what curious. If the issue is traffic then 
fast food should pay the same or more 
since these obviously generate more traffic 
than the sit-down counterparts. There is 
no assurance as to where patrons pur- 
chased their gasoline. Coming from Wis- 
consin they will assuredly fill-up where 
prices are significantly lower and where 
the taxes paid will not benefit the people 
of Illinois. 

There are two other issues to be con- 
sidered. Docs the term "improvement" in 
this context relate to new construction, 
maintenance or existing roads or both? 
Should not this fee be assigned exclu- 
sively to new roads and lane expansions 
with gasoline taxes to be used for mainte- 
nance of existing roads? Finally is an ex- 
clusive use mandate? This ordinance 
would be best advised to contain a man- 
date so that the redirection of "surplus" 
funds to noh-rclaled uses is prevented. 

R. T. Warrender 
Lindcnhurst 

Open space plan 

Editor: 

The Libcrtyville Township Open Space 
District continues to be a conU-oversial 
topic among area residents. Managing 
the only Open Space District in the state 
of Illinois is a challenging responsibility 
faced by our elected Township officials. 
To further understand this complex issue, 
the League of Women Voters of Liberty- 
ville/Mundelein conducted a year long 
study of the purpose, implementation, 
management and financing of this sole 
Open Space District in Illinois. The 
study has been completed and copies arc 
available at Cook Memorial Library for 
review. 

As a result of this study the League 
encourages the elected officials of 
Libcrtyville Township to formulate and 
publish a comprehensive open space 
plan. Public input and intergovernmental 
cooperation should be key components 
of this plan. 

The League believed funds from die 
original bond issue are best used for 
acquisition, preservadon, restoration, and 
maintenance of open land. Expert staff 
and environmental studies should be 
financed when appropriate. 

The league favors passive recreational 
and educational use of land acquired by 
the Open Space DisU-ict. It is important 
for the Township Board to solicit public 
input in making land use decisions. The 
League opposes the use of open space 
funds for permanent, high density use 
structures. 



get of drivers. 

State recommendations are b) place 
them 30inchcs irom the curb line. In 
Round Lake Beach that means drivers clip 
them faster than the village can put them 
up. 

Mayor Carl Schrlmpf has sug- 
gested placing the standards further from 
the parkway and adding an arm to extend 
over the street 

"It won't make any difference," village 
Building Inspector Harold Bauer 
said. "Drivers will still hit them." 

oooooooooooooooooooooo 

TOO GOOD TO EAT 

There were lots of awards at this year's 
Lake County Fair. Many were won by 4- 
Hers. 

One of the prize awards was the grand 
champion steer. The animal was sold this 
year for something like $5.30 a pound to 
Temple Farms of Old Mill Creek. Lesser 
animals brought 75 cents a pound. 

Raising this prize animal was none 
other than Amy Tekampe of Fremont 
Twp. The money will help pay tuition at 
Illinois State University where she is 



• The Open Space District owns 
approximately 955 acres and may 
purchase more land in the future. As 
more and more land in Lake County is 
lost to development, we must look to the 
Open Space District to take the lead in 
preserving and restoring designated 
parcels in Libcrtyville Township. 

Pam Kerpcc, President 

League of Women Voters 

Libertyville/Mundelein Area 

Moore challenged 

Editor 

The audacity of Lake County Forest 
Preserve President Andrea Moore's pro- 
posal to issue $96 million in bonds which 
she has quickly amended to "only $50 
million" in an attempt to show some sort 
of fiscal responsibility prior to the Octo- 
ber 1 deadline is irresponsible, arrogant 
and contemptuous. 

Moore's attempt with a "backdoor ref- 
erendum" to avoid taxpayer participation 
in deference to Governor Edgar's commit- 
ment to property tax reform and the 
statewide taxpayer revolt is a sham. 

Moore and her Forest Preserve Board 
of big spenders and political climbers have 
used the Forest Preserve purchases as im- 
age builders for her political aspirations 
and as one taxpayer, 1 am disgusted with 
her latest proposal. 

I challenge "Antc-up-Moore" and the 
Forest Preserve Board to postpone this 
back door referendum and put any amount 
in a voter referendum as Governor Edgar's 
property tax reform requires next spring 
when she and the whole Forest Preserve 
Board are seeking re-election. 

If "Moore" taxes are good and great, I 
challenge her to present lliis referendum to 
tlic people of Lf&e County. 

Jack L. Martin 

Chairman, Taxpayers for Good 

Government 

Co-Chair, I-RATE: Individuals for 

Responsible and Accountable Tax Equity 

Tired of public howling 

Editon 

As an interested but non-resident ob- 
server of recent events in the Village of 
Gumec I feel compelled to offer up some 
observations to those in political office 
and the residents who put them there: 

To the Mayor, Park Dist. 
Board, etc., etc. 

The village is on the brink of the large 
scale change unlike anything experienced 
in recent Lake County history. You seem 
to be continuously surprised and aghast 
when residents show any opposition to 
* your development plans and agendas when 
at the same time you arc promoting 
Gumce as a town destined to maintain its 
rural character. 



studying to be a handicapped tcach^. 
Her dad? Can't forget him. He's 
Peter Tekampe, past president of the 



Lake County Farm Bureau, who has been 
known to do a little farming in these 
parts. 




I';' 



1 









f 



The very lifestyle issues that arc being 
promoted to draw residents is in direct 
competition with your efforts to develop 
commercial projects. While the two are 
not entirely mutually exclusive it docs not 
seem that the residents expectations are 
being met with reality in all cases. 

Keep in mind that while special inter- 
est dollars certainly help in elections it is 
the residents diat vole. A few well placed 
gaffes like the recent park disUrict expan- 
sion plans could leave a few people out of 
office and not knowing why. 

To the Residents: 

Your town now extends for all practi- 
cal purposes all the way to Rie. 45. It's 
time to stop thinking about the village, 
its parks, and other public facilities as that 



quaint collection of buildings in the center 
ofGumee. 

You will soon have fellow residents 
west of the tollway who will be asking 
and then demanding services and facilities 
close by their homes. Most of the new 
population growth and voters will be west 
of the tollway; short-sighted decisions 
now will be hard to reverse in the future 
after the developers are gone. 

Above all, get involved with ihc pro- 
cess you village goes through to plan, 
approve, and implement commercial, 
residential, and public projects. Speak out 
(for or against), vote, and take 
responsibility for the outcome; these after 
the fact bowlings are gelling tiresome. 

John R. Nordin, Jr. 
Gumee 



BEKHiDT 




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22438 W. Erhart Rd. • Mmidelein 
Mon.-Fri. 8-5, Saturday 8-12 

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Lakeland Classifieds 

Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakelarf Jl^owspdpors 1 T 



-_- —J i»-v.''**J- 




Author's note: This Is the Initial entry 
In what will hopefully be a semi- 
regular series of stories depleting 
the lighter side of some potentially 
perilous or perhaps not-so- 
dangerous situations. Sort of a 
Mondo Ridculous. Please bear with 
me. or I'll have to get a real job. 

Danger links around every comer. 
Whether you're skydivin', highway 
drivin', late arrivin' or just shuckin' and 
jivin', peril is as prevalent as junk cars in 
a Hoosier's front yard. 

You can find danger at home, in the 
supermarket, at the Tastcc Freeze, on the 
beach, in an adult bookstore theater (Pee 
Wee's playhouse) — just about anywhere. 
Like my good friend. Badlands Duprcc, 
once said, "Danger's like a woman — Just 
when you think it's safe to stay out 
drinkin' for four or five days, she'll throw 
all your Slim Whitman albums right out 
of the trailer." I've never been sure what 
that meant, but we'd just split a fifth of 
Jack, so it doesn't really matter. 

For many people, the real game of 
jeopardy is played every day of their lives. 
There are no prizes — there are only 
losers. 

It's the danger of being noticed. 
Arc you one of those people who can't 
stand being the last person to enter a room 
full of people because everyone will turn 
and look right at you? Did you know the 
answers in school but didn't raise your 
hand because it would attract attention? 

For the self-conscious, being the cen- 
ter of attention isn't worse than a firing 
squad — it is a death sentence: death by 
embarrassment. It's hell on earth. 

Speaking of hell, this guy dies and 
goes to that firey region. When he gets 
there, they give him three choices of as- 
signment tor all eternity. In one room, the 
people are being fiogged by demons. In 
another area, the lost souls are thrown 
into a huge pit full of snakes. In the third 
room, the people are standing around 
knee-dccp in manure, talking and sipping 
coffee. "Heck, this doesn't look so bad," 
he says. So, they give him a cup of cof- 
fee, and he wades out into the room. 
Then, an announcement comes over the 
public-address system: "All right, coffee 
break's over — cvcybody back on Ihcir 
heads." 

But seriously folks, a couple of weeks 
ago, I was in the grocery store and pre- 
pared to invest in some pasta sauce. When 
I pulled one jar from the shelf, two more 
fell to the floor and exploded. Except for 
me, the aisle had been empty, but now it 
was alive with the curious. I was morti- 
fied — • my face was as red as the sauce on 
my pants. "Look what he did," a little girl 
accused from her shopping-carl scat. 
"Shush," her mother advised, apparently 
sensing that I was becoming dangerous. 

Of course, there are those people who 
can't get enough of the limelight — glad- 
handing social gadflies who are eager to 
make asses of themselves at every oppor- 
tunity. You know them — they're the 
ones who come to ilie parly already wear- 
ing lamp shades on ihcir heads. 

I had traveled with some friends to the 
Bristol (Wis.) Renaissance Fairc for a 
Saturday's worth of respite and revelry. 

We'd walked around the faire a couple 
of times, seen a joust and sampled some 
food and libations when we decided we'd 
take in an act at the Globe Theater. 

The act was "The Singing Execution- 
ers," starring Mr. Blogg and Mr. Smce, 



two hilarious henchmen trying to get "a 
head" in show business. 

The act started out just fine. Blogg and 
Smce did a variety of humorous song-and- 
dancc routines depicting the lighter side of 
capital punishment 

I didn't even know I was in danger un- 
til I heard the words, "For the next part of 
the show, we'll need a volunteer from the 
audience." 

I started to sweat. We were sitting 
close to the stage — the third row back. 



I went up on stage, played the stooge 
(much to my [ex]friends' amusement) and 
returned to my seat no worse for the wear. 

Over the course of the next week, 
however, the whole affair stuck in my 
craw like a jumbo cheese dog. (I like 'em 
with mustard and relish.) 

I decided to go back to the fairc and 
find out just who these guys thought they 
were to expose me to public ridicule. 
Were other innocent souls being treated so 
shabbily? 




John Doering (left) and 
Al Olson. "The Singing 
Executioners/ prepare 
to put the author out of 
his misery at the Bristol 
Renaissance Falre. If 
you're prepared to stick 
your neck out, Sahjrday 
and Sunday, Aug. 17 
and 18 are tlTe final two 
days of the 1991 falre 
season - Photos by Lisa 
Ingellls 




smack in the middle. 

What were the chances I'd be chosen 
from among the 300 or so seated for the 
show? They say your chances of winning 
the louery are the same as being struck by 
lighming, but I'll take the money. 

I was doing my best to — like the 
student who doesn't know the answer — 
avoid eye contact with the executioners. I 
was sipping on a Hacker Pschorr and eat- 
ing some roasted almonds (both excellent, 
I might add), so I figured they'd leave me 
alone. 

But nol I heard them make a reference 
to "Kenosha Vice," and my heart sank. I 
was wearing — • as is my habit — a cheap, 
gaudy Hawaiian-style shirt, and I knew 
iliey were talking about me. I looked up, 
and Smce was extending his hand toward 
me. 

Incidentally, this is a great time to go 
to your favorite discount store and slock 
up on cheap, gaudy summer shirts. 
They're on sale, they're 100-pcrcent rayon 
and they're made in China, so you know 
they're good. And, they look great wilh a 
leisure suit, a tasteful medallion and 
matching while shoes and belt. Just don't 
stand too close to an open flame. 

Anyway, in a nanosecond I realized it 
would be more embarrassing to refuse 
than to be somebody's buffoon for a cou- 
ple of minutes. And, as Badlands would 
say (in much less genteel terms), "No 
testosterone, no toddlers." 



I caught their act the following Satur- 
day, and lo and behold, they pulled another 
unsuspecting dupe from the audience. 

"Fiends!" I cursed under my breath. 

But it was an entirely different experi- 
ence for this show's chosen chump. He 
actually seemed to enjoy the atlcnlion and 
went out of his way lo wax silly. 

It takes all kmds. 

It had been Blogg and Smec's final 
show for die day, so I was able to catch a 
word with them backstage. 

Without their hoods, they were John 
Doering (Blogg) and Al Olson (Smec), a 



9re0 
miller 



couple of Minnesota natives currently 
calling, respectively, Clearwater, Fla. and 
Ft. Worth, Tex. their homes. 

Ahal Minnesota — that huge snow- 
cone maker. A land so cold that brain 
damage can occur in the time it takes you 
to stick your head out the window and 
yell, "Get outta my yard, ya damn kids!" 

This theory also goes a long way to 
explain Viking fans. 

Al and John — high school buddies in 
Minneapolis — were able to escape the 
mind-numbing cold after earning degrees 
in physics (Al) and psychology (John) at 
UofM. 

"We're putting it (their educations) to 
work everyday," Al observed. 

The duo has been expanding on their 
comic repertoire since their high school 
days. When they started on the Renais- 
sance Faiie circuit (there are several around 
the country), their act included a woman 
and was a minstrel trio. 

They put together "The Singing Exe- 
cutioners" in the late '70s. The act in- 
cludes such all-time favorites as "At the 
Block," "If I Were A Headsman" and 
"Wild and Crazy Executioners." 

" Wc do several different kinds of mu- 
sic," Al said. "We do comedy music in 
general." 

John is built like a smaller version of 
Arnold Schwartzeneggcr: "I've been 
pumping iron for over 20 years," he ex- 
plained. 

At 6-foot-4 and well over 200 pounds, 
Al is a mountain of a man who's experi- 
enced a small avalanche: "I used to (pump 
iron), but I've been letting it go to seed," 
he offered. 

Al and John spend a good portion of 
the year toiu'ing. Another mainstay for 
them is their satirical country and western 
act, "Doering and Olson," which includes 
such tender ballads as "I'm Overeating My 
Heart Over You" and "A Cow Ain't No 
Girl For A Cowboy." 

Sauirday and Sunday, Aug. 17-18 arc 
the final two days of the 1991 Bristol Re- 
naissance Faire season. If you'd like the 
opportunity to be publicly humiliated, 
there are several acts more than happy to 
accommodate. Audience participadon runs 
rampant and it's all in good fun. 

In fact, after I talked to Al and John, I 
wiuicsscd some willing moron stand on 
his head in The Mud Pit at the request of 
"Tlie Sturdy Beggars." 

Go figure. 




FREELANCE REPORTERS 

WANTED 

Lakeland Newspapers is looking for freelance reporters 
to cover village board meetings. Experience preferred, 
but enthusiasm is more Important. Especially needed 
are reporters to cover Vernon Hills and North Chicago. 

Call Claudia Lenart, managing editor 
(708) 223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




j 






12 Lakeland Newspapers , 



Friday, August 16, T991 



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DDE TO THE 

FLDCTDATING 

ECONOMY OLD 

VOLO IS 

ABANDONING ALL 

PRESENT AND INCOMING 

STOCK. THE PDRPOSB OF THIS 

SALE IS TO DALANCE INVENTORY 

AND DICREASE GASH FLOW! 






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is hereby given that on Thtirs., Aug. 15, Fri., Aug 16, Sat., 
Aug. 17 and Sun., Aug. 18 

WORTH OF HOME FURNISHINGS AND RELATED 
ITEMS WILL BE PLACED ON TO THE MARKET AT UP 
TO 70% OFF. A GIANT TENT WILL BE ERECTED ON 
THIS SITE, AS ALL SALE ITEMS CANNOT FIT IN THE 
STORES. DOORS OPEN FOR PUBLIC REMOVAL AT 10 
A.M. EACH DAY. 



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SALE E]\DS Alio. 1 8tli 



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.10-5 • Siiii; 10-5 • Only! 



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RULES OF TfflS SALE 

First come, first served. Merchandise sold 
as shown. All sales final. No exchanges. 
No refunds. No hold orders. No phone 
orders. All items subject to prior sale. 
Right to limit quantities. All items in stock 
when tabloid prepared. Prior sales, 
discounts and orders not honored. 
Existing special orders wiU be processed 
as usual. 




1991 FLOOR SAMPLES AND 
OVERSTOCK FURNITURE AND 
BEDDING MUST BE SOLD!!! 

DISCOUNTS UP TO 70% ON SOFAS, 
LOVE SEATS, CHAIRS, RECLINERS, 
SLEEPERS, TABLES, BEDROOM 
SETS, ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS, 
LAMPS, ACCESSORIES, DESKS, 
BOOKCASES, CURIOS, GIFTS AND 
MATTRESS SETS. 



No item will be held back regardless of name 
brand - all purchases must be removed. No 
lay-aways accepted. All inventory to be sold 
up to 70% off. 

-k PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE 

• LA-Z-BOY® 

• KING HICKORY 
-k LANE® 

• SEALY ® <^^<^ 



® 






c,^^0^^^ 



90 DAY FREE FINANCING 
SALE IN 3 STORES 




• COUNTRY 
GALLERIES 

• FURNITURE & 
BEDDING 

• BARN OUTLET 




Discovn 



WM 



otovoio 





1,0 VOF O 

¥ILLAGE 



ON ROUTE 120-1/2 MILE WEST OF 
RT. 12 — IN VOLO BETWEEN FOX 
LAKE, McHENRY & WAUCONDA 



J 



Friday. AugusM 6, 1991 



Lakeland Nowspaperc 13 



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yNe Sincerely Feel We Have The Best Chrysler Service Dept Anywhere 



.Received Chrysler Service Professional Award 

{Based on customer surveys) 

.Most Modern, Up-To-Dale Equipment 
.Computer Engine Analyzer 
.Computer Wheel Balancer 
.Computer 4 Wheel Aligner 



.Many Special Chrysler Tools 
.Complete Chrysler Technical Library. 
.Access to Chrysler Engineers 
.Certified Mechanics 
.Continuous Factory Training 
.We Know Our Product 



•Very Competitive Pricing 

•Large Inventory Of O.E. Parts 

.20 Years of Service To The Community 

•Our Success Is Based On Report 

Business, and Referrals From 

Satisfied Customers 



OmopQr 



CHRYSLER MOTOPS 
GENUINE PARTS 



Are You 



^ Long waits for 
appointments 

jt- 3 trips to the dealer 
for the same repair 



5}- Poor explanation of | 



work performed 

>^ Impersonal attitudes 
of service personnel 

yirCar not ready when 
promised 




1990 FIVE.STAR 

SOMCeOUAUTYAWAKI 







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Mg 



If the other guy can% WE CAN!! 

We will gladly do warranty work on your Chrysler, 
Plymouth, Dodge car or truck no matter where it was 
purchased. 




RUNNING SMOOTH IS 

CMART 

SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE AT REGULAR TIMES 









r—m tsszn Msaa BfM3 riTira rzxs axa 





Fsf^©®.^ IftfifilMde 








4 WHEEL AUGNMEHT CHECK 

INCLUDES: 
COMPLETE COMPUTER PRINTOUT- 
ANALYZING STEERING, SUSPENSION, AND 

ALIGNMENT NEEDS 
WITH WRIHEN ESTIMATE 



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(Engi«o. nKjxuring .pocuil/c-xlx-u Ml m;<l dl,.:--^! Oli^^r. nli.vhil)' hh^^^) 

,^^ nou ssirm Vi" ' ^ " fstsa tsxm cuss ca=3 cr^J c=r3 c— aa t.^^ 



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HIHI 






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SHOWROOM 
Open Monday Thru Thursday 9 amto^B^pm^f^idajTS^m .to 6 pm 

Satlir<iav 9 am to 5 pm • CLOSEDSU NDA Y 



SERVICE PARTS :^--^^ 
OPEN MONDAYTHRUi=RIDAY 730 A.M.TO B.DO P.M. 



CHHTtUi-nMOTDjn 



91 South Rte; No. 12 



70S-587!i 



IVIailcrCord 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



14 Lakeland Newspapers 



" 11 



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J 




■■■■■■' .} • 

Newspapers 




Old resort takes on new owners, new look 



by GREG MILLER 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Is it Patrick Swayze running amok 
wearing a maniacal grin and carrying a fiic 
ax? 

No, that's not it 

How about Jack Nicholson wearing a 
t-shirt and tight jeans and doing the lam- 
baM 

No, that doesn't work either. 

What does work, however, is Nip- 
persink Country Club and Lodge, an. his- 
toric resort area situated on Tomb^u Lake 
between Twin Lakes and Genoa City, 
Wis. 

What you can't get a handle on is 
whether you expect to see Swayze doing 
some "Dirty Ehmcing" or Nicholson talk- 
ing to ghosts on the set of "The Shining" 
in the 71-year-old complex. 

The picturesque resort was once the 
summer place to be for a predominantly 
Jewish crowdv which gathered for fun in 
the sun, high-society interaction and big- 
name entenainment 

About six years ago, a fire destroyed 
parts of the lodge and die hotel, but the 
beat goes on. 

The hotel and the lodge arc currently 
undergoing some serious refurbishing ef- 
forts. New owners Bill Seawall, Roger 
Chisholm and Jotin Keporos want to re- 
turn the resort to the status it enjoyed 
during years past 

The hotel is closed this season while 
all 90 rooms are remodeled and kitch- 
enettes are added to many. Vacationers can 
stay in the resort's cottages this year, but 
those 40 units will receive kitchenettes 
and other touches this winter. 

The 18-hole championship golf course 
— with popular pro John DeSantis — 
has been available througtiout tne changes 
to the resort. 

Shcryl Fischer is in her first year as 
the resort office manager, but her affair 
with Nippcrsink goes back "off and on" 
for 15 years. 

"I was the reservations clerk," Fischer 
said. "I've done everything from being a 
waitress and a maid." 

Fischer said plans are to "winterize" 
the lodge, hotel and cottages with hopes 
of starting a year-round schedule. Tradi- 
tionally, die 157-acrc resort opened in 
May and closed in September. 

Nippcrsink is an Indian word for 
"home of little waters." While the lodge 
has some rustic touches, the resort is 
more of an eclectic combination of coun- 
try and elegance. 

"We have a saying here: "Nippcrsink is 
very easy on the eyes,'" Fischer said. "It's 




very relaxing. 

"Most of the people who come here 
are from the city, and they want some- 
thing country-ish." 

Fischer said the focus has changed 
from a full slate of planned activities for 
guests to a more take-it-as-it-comes ap- 
proach. 

"Vacations were exhausting — there 
were constant activities. It's a much more 
relaxing dme now." 

Still, there's plenty to do. 

In the lodge, there's the Sound Barrier, 
a teen club with a large-screen TV and 
video games. On party nights, there's a DJ 
or live bands. The drinks are non-alco- 
holic. 

There's an Olympic-sized swimming 
pool, a pool (billiards) room, tennis 
courts, volleyball courts, a Softball dia- 
mond, basketball courts, a weight-lifting 
and exercise room, horseshoe pits, shuf- 



fleboard courts and a playground for the 
little ones. 

And, of course, there are fish to be 
caught in Tombcau Lake, where boats can 
be launched and docked. 

"The fishing's good here," Fischer 
said. "Basically, it's pan fish — blue gills 
and crappics." 

Some of the reminders of the old days 
are gone, however. TTic dorm that housed 
300 employees was recently torn down, 
and the resort no longer has a stable. 

The huge, elegant main dining room 
seats 500, and is available for wedding re- 
ceptions and other parties. There's gift 
shop and general recreation/meeting 
rooms. 

When the main dining room is empty, 
it brings to mind the set for the film 
adaption of Stephen King's "The Shin- 
ing." 



Fischer, who spends the winter around 
die lodge, said, "Everybody says that It 
does get a little weird here in the winter 
with everybody gone." 

Actually, the resort was the site for the 
filming of a CBS movie stairing Ed As- 
ner, "Following the Footsteps." 

The new owners are no strangers to 
enterprise. Seawall and Chisholm own 
Bristol Oaks Country Club, while Sea- 
wall and Keporos are partners in the Bay- 
side Inn, Treasure Island, Fla. Keporos, 
the owner of car dealerships in 
Chicagoland, also owns the Bayside in 
Williams Bay. Wis. 

Golf packages are available with hotel 
and cottage stays. For example, it's 
$49.95 per person, per day for a collage, 
greens fee, power cart and use of the lodge 
facilities this season. 

For reservations or more information, 
call (414) 279-5281. 



DANCENIER 
NORTH 




i jiLiw.tm . 1% u '..■wiiiin]m»'>.-"M<'i.i I'UMM.j'iAHi-' •«/* W^.'itr^l.,-V.'i 



■».T.,^:n;;:arwi. .-II -I. »i->wa e^Bi»:g wii».wrK« 



Fall Semester 
September 9th - January 25th 

CALL NOW FOR A 
FREE BROCHURE 

540 N. MILWAUKEE AVE. 
LIBERTYVILLE 

367-7970 



Friday. August 16, 1991 



Discounted 
for quick sale 



BBaniff'M-u.'tiA: 




RT. 14, NORTH WEST HWY. BARRINGTON 708-381-8850 



•rrr-.T^s-'i-^-TFrr 



SSZSBBBS 



u LJ»_I ■!■ -WX- 



Lakeland Nowspapers 15 



rTSWWfWWMa"*'"'"''"'-'" 



Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Best laid rinancial plans may still lead to «ebt 



F 



by CD. WHITE 

What is the main hin- 
drance to wealth accumula- 
tion and goal achievement 
today for the average 
American? 

Surprisingly, the answer 
is not related to a disaster 
such as death, divorce, dis- 
ability or depression (loss 
of your job). There is an- 
other "D" which is far more 
pervasive in society today 
and just as disastrous to 
even the best laid financial 
plans-debL 

Why docs debt play such 
a critical role? There is 
nothing wrong with debt 
itself, rather it is the mis- 
management of that debt. 
When the borrowing be- 
comes as easy as reaching 
into your wallet for a credit 
card, suddenly the ability to 
manage the payments or the 
other financial priorities 
you had becomes secondary 
to yet anolhcr "D"- desire. 
It is when desire is not 
constrained by a prioritized 
spending plan and borrow- 
ing is easy, then disaster 
su-ikes. 

Take a look at the inter- 
est rales on your credit cards 
or consumer loans. Even 
with the recent decline in 
interest rates, credit cards 



sdll average over 18.5 per- 
cent nationally; personal 
loans are at 16.5 percent and 
auto loan are over 10.5 per- 
cent. 

Since we are into 1991, 
the interest you pay on 
these loans are now com- 
pletely nondeductible. Is it 
any wonder people get in 
over their heads very 

This way 
to wealth 

quickly? If you maintain a 
monthly balance on your 
credit cards, every SlOO of 
debt costs $18.50 in interest 
annually. 

If you are in the 31 per- 
cent tax bracket, this means 
you have to earn $26.81 to 
pay that interest. If you 
want your $100 investment 
to make the payment for 
you a 26.81 percent pretax 
return is required. That 
would mean taking a hefty 
risk year after year, since 
you are only paying the in- 
terest costs and no principal 
at all. 

A better solution would 
be to turn this "debt spiral" 
around. Work hard at paying 
those consumer loans off. 



focusing on the highest in- 
terest rate first and then 
paying down the lower in- 
terest loans in order. 

As we discussed previ- 
ously, paying off these 
loans translates into high 
returns on your money 
(over 26 percent) because of 
reduced interest expenses. 
Then, once these debts arc 
repaid, set aside a similar 
amount for investment pur- 
poses so the miracle of 
compound interest can work 
for you instead of against 
you. 

Many individual's who 
carry balances on the credit 
cards or auto loans are just 
plain lazy. They have the 
recommended three month 
liquid reserve and other 
money in the bank to pay 
their loans off, but don't 

Remember, there is al- 
ways a price for conve- 
nience and ease. In this 
case, the price comes in 
paying 10.5 percent on an 
auto loan while your money 
market fund is paying less 
than six percent and your 
certificates of deposit is 
paying around eight percent. 
What about those savings 
bonds that arc netting you a 
whopping 7.5 percent? 
Does it make sense to 



maintain these investments 
while paying off that car 
loan? It doesn't take a 
mathematician to calculate 
the answer to that one. 

One alternative to con- 
sumer loans which have 
become popular recently are 
home equity loans. These 
have made the cost of bor- 
rowing cheaper but have not 
solved the problem of over 
spending and mismanage- 
ment of debt. 

The only way I have 
seen this problem remedied 
is for a financial plan to be 
prepared which sets forth 
clearly what the family's 
goals are and what it will 
take to achieve those goals. 
Then, the goal achievement 
. takes a stronger priority 
position to the double "D" 
whammy of desire/debt, and 
the downward spiral is bro- 
ken. 



To decide whether or not 
to take on a certain level of 
debt, take a step back first 
and look at your overall 
picture. Where does the de- 
sired item fit into your pri- 
orities? Am I needing this 
just because it is on sale? 

Then compare the cost, 
of debt to your interest re- 
turn on your assets and sec 
if the cost is too high (on 
an after-tax basis). 

If so, pay cash or put off 
the purchase until your 
short-term investment fund 
has the money to buy that 
prioritized item. You will 
find your discretionary cash 
each month improved as 
well as your personal satis- 
faction, as each goal is 
achieved. 

If you think you are 
scoring a financial "D" 
please write to me because I 



would like to know about 
your experiences and per- 
haps we can help you even- 
tually improve your grade 
to an "A." 

Editor's note: 
Charles D. White is 
president of Financial 
Advisory Corp., Ar- 
lington Heights and 
Lake Forest' IL, an in- 
vestment advisory 
firm. He also is a cer- 
tified financial planner 
with an MBA in fi- 
nance. He is a member 
of a panel of financial 
experts preparing This 
Way To Wealth. Your 
questions are invited 
by writing to This 
Way To Wealth in care 
of this paper or 2203B 
Lakeside Drive, Ban- 
nockburn, IL 60015. 



K 



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.JOIN us 

FOR 

Victory Memorial Hospital's 

EMERGENCY HEALTHCARE FAIR 

1324 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan 
360-4246. 



\ 





f^x 



Sunday, August 18, 1991 



l-4p.m. 

* Visit our new Eraergenqr and Outpatient Services Addition 

* Witness a mock cardiac emergency 

* Learn about life-saving equipment and treatments 

* Children, bring your stuffed animal to the 

•Teddy Bear Clinic" 

* Tour ambulances and the "Flight for Life" helicopter 

* Also tour otu: new Admitting, Volunteer, Emergency 

Medical Service, and Security Departments 

BRING THIS AD AND RECEIVE A FREE GIFT 
Name 

Address 

City 

Phone . 



/ 




Has your heart 

had its 

r39,ooo 

mile 



? 



HEART 
SCREENING 

$39 



checkupf 

Now a thorough 
heart screening 
is just $39. 



If you're Ilk© most people, you'll walk about 
1.000 miles each year. Those miles can add 
up. That's why It's vAse to take steps to protect 
your heart — especially If you're 39 or older, 
or have a family history of heart disease. 

To help get you headed In the right 
direction, the Heart Center of Lake County 
located at Saint Theres© Medical Center Is 
offering a thorough heart screening for just 
•39, Designed to Identify your cardiac risk 
fad jrs, this screening Includes: 

• Heart Fitness Test 

• HDL and LDL cholesterol 
•Total cholesterol/HDL ratio 
•Total blood cholesterol 

• Blood pressure 
•Triglyceride level 

• Cardiac risk factor analysis 

It's Important to know the condition of your 
heart. By having this screening, you're taking 
great strides towards finding out just how 
healthy your heart really Is. To make an 
appointment or for more Information, please 
call (708) 360-2772. 



Ri 

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Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



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Saint Therese 
Medical Center 



Heart Center of Lake County 

,A Division of Franciscan Sisters Hcahh Care Corporation 
2615 Washington Sireci Waukegan. Illinois 60085-4988 






16.Lakoland Newspapers 



Friday,Augustl6, 1991 



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16. 1991 







Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




Richard Chirchirillo 

Richard Chirchirillo has joined 
ALRA Laboratories as a production 
and maintenance supervisor, an- 
nounced Dr. Raj Bhutani, 
president. In his new position, 
Chirchirillo will be responsible for 
supervising and allotting 
manpower, scheduling efficient 
liquid dosage production 
operations, equipment maintenance 
and calibrations, training and de- 
veloping production employees, 
and participating in troubleshoot- 
ing, machine set-up, and new 
product manufacturing implemen- 
tations. Prior to joining ALRA, 
Chirchirillo worked for the Sara 
Lcc Corporation as a maintenance 
mechanic and then as a maintenance 
supcrvfisor where he directed a 13- 
pcrson crew maintaining 10 make- 
up and filling production lines, 
Chirchirillo, his wife and two 
children reside in Zion. 



poration as a production manager 
directing the activities of 13 super- 
visors and 250 hourly employees. 
Previously, he served as facUilies 
and maintenance manager and 
facilities superintendent for Sara 
Lcc. Toll is a member of the 
American Institute of Plant Engi- 
neers. Toll and his family reside in 
Grayslake. 



Char Brooks 

Long time Libcrtyvillc 
resident, Charlcnc Brooks passed 
the million mark in 1991 sales 
according to Tom Krcuscr, 
manager of the First United 
Libenyvillc office. This is her 
ISth consecutive year of million 
dollar plus production. Brooks is 
a life member of ihc S3 million 
club and has been among the top 
producers since joining First 
United in 19S2. Brook and her 
family live in the Intcrlakcn area 
of Libcrtyvillc. 



Schroeder & Associates enters 
worldwide public affairs network 




Ron Howitt 

Ron Howitt, a resident of Long 
Grove, has been named area man- 
ager of operator services by AT&T 
for a seven-state area. His office 
will be located in Chicago. 

In his new position, Howitt 
will oversee nine offices where 
long-distance operators handle col- 
lect, AT&T card and pcrson-to-pcr- 
son calls for customers calling 
from Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, 
Nebraska. North Dakota. South 
Dakota and Wisconsin. 

A 1968 graduate of Northwest 
Missouri State University with a 
bachelor of science degree in mar- 
keting, Howitt began his AT&T 
career in St. Louis with the billing 
and inquiry office in 1983. After 
several management positions in 
various departments that handled 
leased equipment and long-distance 
billing, Howitt supervised the 
consumer sales and service center in 
Itasca. 

Howitt and his wife, Carol, 
recently moved to Long Grove 
from Arlington Heights, 



Schroeder & Associates, 
a government relations fum 
based in Hoffman Estates, 
has joined Hill and Knowl- 
ton's Public Affairs 
Worldwide network. 

Hill and Knowlton is 
the world's leading interna- 
tional public relations and 
public affairs counseling 
firm. 

Schroeder & Associates 
was formed in 1989 by 
Mark G. Schroeder after he 
served for ten years in a 
variety of positions in Illi- 
nois state government and 
politics. 

The firm offers its 
clients representation before 
the Executive, Legislative 
and Regulatory branches of 



Illinois state government 
Schroeder & Associates 
also provides consulting 
services to companies and 
organizations on political, 
social and economic mat- < 
ters as they relate to slate 
government, 

"I am delighted to have 




Mark G. Schroeder 



my firm become a member 
of Hill and Knowlton's 
Public Affairs Worldwide 
network," Schroeder said. 
"This relationship will al- 
low us to utilize their vast 
communications expertise 
to assist our clients in 
reaching public affaij^ ob- 
jectives." 

With the increasing in- 
fluence of state govern- 
ments, Hill and Knowlton 
was a leader in recognizing 
the importance of providing 
public affairs services at the 
stale and local level for its 
clients. 

Schroeder and his wife, 
Mary, reside in Lake Zurich 
and have two sons. He is 
the son of Alice Schroeder 



f 



YoGiVDER Kumar. M.D. 



Diplomale American Board of Internal Medicine 

announces the opening of his office for the 

practice In Internal Medicine, 

Diabetes, Endocrinology. 

135 N. Greenleaf, Suite 220 
Gurnee 

244-6800 



.•'i. 




L 



Convenient Hours: Afternoons, Evenings and Saturdays 
Formerly at Great Lakes Naval Hospital 



Think of it as insurance 

Insurance that you'll bo able to see all the sunsets, all 
the bouquets and all the laughter in the years ahead. 

DR. ALAN RUEDl 

OPTOMETRIST 

92 E. Main SL Lake Zurich 438-6966 



CLC prepares you 
for a real career. 

Get the skills you need for success. Choose Medical Records 
Technology, Office/Secretarial Re-entry program or another of more 
than 50 specialized career training options offered by CLC. Whether 
you're just starting out, changing careers or returning to the work world, 
CLC will give you the training you need. 




Ed Toll 

Ed Toll has joined ALRA 
Laboratories as opcralions manager, 
announced Dr. Raj BhulnnJ, presi- 
dent. In his new position, Toll will 
be responsible for nnnnaging, 
scheduling, and supervising pro- 
duclion employees and opcralions 
during ihc manufatture of phamia- 
cculical products, monitoring 
manufaduring and production cffi- 
cicncy, training supervision, coor- 
dinating activities of managers of 
facilities, production and material 
control, and working with the di- 
rector of quality assurance and other 
staff members in order to manage 
operations in compliance with 
CGMP. Prior to joining ALRA, 
Toll worked for the Sara Lcc Cor- 




Linda West DeCaire 

CLC uraduate 1986 

Curre^ntly. department secretary, 

Parks and Uecreation, 

Village of Libertyville 




Gail Mays 

CLC graduate 1991 
Currently, cancer registrar, 

M.7here.e Medical Center, Waukegan 



Enroll today at the College of Lake County! 

Registration for fall classes is now underway. 

Classes start August 26. Call 223-3636 for more information. 



and the late Frank 
Schroeder of Libertyville, 
where he foimerly resided. 



AUTO SALES 

2222 W. RAND RD. PALATINE 

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Friday, August! 6, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 17 



. V'^jr:_'»^^'r- ^ ▼ 



•—.,. , \ \^^^ 




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STU DIO OF PAW CE 



BEGINNER THRU ADVANCED, 3 YEAR TO ADULT 

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Eye problems may send kids 
to books or away from them 



The child who avoids 
books and the one who de- 
vours ihem may both be 
motivated by the same 
thing: an eye problem. 

It isn't the same eye 
problem, however. Children 
who prefer reading to active 
play often do so because 
they arc nearsighted. They 
can see better up close than 
at a distance. 

Those who dislike 
books and schoolwork tend 
to have problems with far- 
sightedness, eye coordina- 
tion and eye movement 



skills, which make reading 
difficult. 

School screenings are 
not a reliable way to check 
a child's vision, says the 
American Optomciric Assn. 
Many still use the eye 
charts which checks distance 
vision but no other vision 
problems. 

A thorough back-lo- 
school eye examination is 
recommended. The op- 
tometrist should evaluate 
not only how well a child 
sees up close and at a dis- 
tance but how well the eyes 



work together as a team, 
eye/hand coordination and 
several eye movement and 
eye focusing skills. 

Glasses are usually all 
the help a nearsighted or 
farsighicd child needs to see 

well. 

Children with eye coor- 
dination, eye movement and 
eye focusing problems may 
also be helped with glasses 
but, more often, will bene- 
fit from a treatment pro- 
gram called vision therapy, 
which leaches Ihcm how to 
use their two eyes together. 



No time for reading? 



Reading to your children 
is one of the best things 
you can do. It's quality time 
spent together, and it 
leaches children about the 
world. 

Sometimes when you 
have work from the office 



or housework to do, you 
just don't have time to sit 
down and read with your 
children. Why not read 
books aloud on lapes? This 
way your children can listen 
to your familiar voice any 
time they want to hear a 
story. 



Taping books is 
excellent for new readers. 
They can follow along in 
the book while you read. 
They can Icam to associate 
words with their spellings 
by following along in the 
book or they can practice 
reading aloud with the tape. 





r~ A SPECIAL OFFER i 

I A special BACK TO SCHOOL Offer. FREE Scratch Coating I 
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18 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



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073 



usn6. 1991 



I 







A guide to children's allergies 



Ctiildren with never- 
ending "colds" — chronic 
runny noses, itchy eyes and 
croupy coughs — may, in 
fact, have allergies. 
Children's allergies are 
sometimes confused with 
colds because youngsters are 
not familiar with allergies 
and their symptoms and, 
therefore, cannot express 
their discomfort to parents 



or school nurses. 

According to reports by 
allergy specialists and 
related foundations, more 
than 20 million U.S. 
children suffer firom 

allergies. Among children 
ages six to 15, sneezing, 
itchy eyes and run noses 
account for 130 million lost 

school days, It is important 




that parents leam about the 
tell-tale aller^ signs and 
discuss the child's 
symptoms with a family 
doctor or allergy specialist. 

The following chart can 
help parents to distinguish 

the symptoms that signal 
possible allergies from 
those that are probably a 
cold. 




COLD 



ALLERGY 



4 





Family history 



not relevant almost always 



W 



Initated, red 



almost never 



often 



itchy eyes 



^ Sneezing 
^ Duration 




sometimes 
2 days to 

2 weeks 




almost always M 
may be persistent 

and recurrent 



^ Fever 

g^ -. Nasal discharge 




i 



"Allergic crease" 
(horizontal crease at 
the bridge of the nose). 



almost always rarely 
thick, cloudy, thin, clear 
yellowish and watery 




i 




Little Lambs 
Preschool 



rarely 



often 





«. 



Allergic "Shiners" 
(discoloration 
under the eye). 



rarely 



often 



4 




.# 




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Si Cfiristian atmospdere designed 
specificaC[yforyour3 & 4 yearoCd, 



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(BotH morning df afternoon sessions 

Located at 

Trinily Evangelicol 
Lulheron Cnurcli 

25519 W. Hwy. 134. Ingleslde. IL 
For More Information Call 

Church (708) 54&-2109 





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Lakeland Newspapers 19 



Fridav. Auaust 16, 1991 



I .^.^ ' j,^ ~^,^J. ' J-L 





Helpful hints reduce 
report card trauma 



Left-handedness has its advantages 



If you have a child who's 
lefUianded, don't try to 

change him or her into a 
righthander. Being left- 
handed may be an advan- 
tage! Did you know that 
year after year, the top 

scorers in the mathematics 
portion of the SAT arc left- 



handed males? 

Not only that, but left- 
handere make up a dispro- 
portionate 20 percent of 
MENSA, an organization 
for people with I.Q.s in the 
lop one percent of the 

population. (Lefthanders 
make up 10 to 15 percent of 



the population.) In fact, 
both Albert Einstein and 

Thomas Edison were left- 
handed 

Many lefthanders are 
adaptable, individualistic, 
highly motivated, and sec 
things from a different point 
of view. 



Report card time can be 
very stressful for both chil- 
dren and parents. Children 
are afraid of the grade they 
will receive and how their 
parents will react, while 
parents are concerned about 
how well their children did 
and how to react to their 
grades. Report card time can 
be a time to share your 
feelings and become closer 
to your children. Here are 
some helpful hints: 
• Remember that unguarded, 
negative comments can hurt 
children. 



Look at and study the re- 
port card as soon as it's 
brought home. Give the re- 
port card back to your child 
and thank him/her for shar- 
ing it with you. Try to re- 
member that the grades be- 
long to your child and not 
to you. 

• Always find something 
good to say, 

• Never make report card • 
time a family event. Chil- 
dren need to know their 
marks arc private. 

■ If grades have stayed the 
same and have not gotten 



better, remember that at 
least they have not gotten 
worse. 

• If grade have gone down, 
react with a hug, not a lec- 
ture. Later, ask you child 
how he/she feels about the 
grade and if he/she wants to 
improve the grade next 
term. Then, offer your help. 

• Alter your expectations if 
necessary. If you know your 
child docs the homework, 
goes to class and still 
doesn't do well in a certain 
subject, that grade may be 
the best you can expect. . 




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CASUAL SLACKS - SPRING & SUMMER JACKETS 






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it 16. 1991 




Help your child do well in school 



Parents know that their 
child's success in school 
goes far beyond learning the 
ABC's anidoing algebra 
homework. As children, head 
back to class. World Book 
offers some simple ways for 
parents to help thek chil- 
dren do well in school. Be- 
cause parents are so busy, 
the tips are designed to take- 
little time and fit into daily 
life. 

World Book lecommends 
that parents keep the fol- 
lowing thought in mind: 
Parents don't have to have 
all the answers to children's 
questions, but what's really 
important is that ihey know 
how to search out answers 
with their children. 
Ten Ways to Help 

1. Handle questions 
when they're asked. 
Every question is a "teach- 
able moment" that could 



slip by if left for "later," so 
search out answers together. 

2. Listen and ask 
your childreii's '\ . 
opinions. If you build- 
children's self esteem at 
home by showing that their 
feelings are important, they 
wUl have the confidence in 
themselves that is so 
important in the classroom. 

3. Praise your 
children. When they do a 
good job in school or at 
home, let them know how 
proud you are. 

4. Read aloud to 
each other. Start early — a 
love of reading starts at 
home, and so much of 
education dq)ends on the 
ability to read 

5. Teach your child 
the joy of reading by 
example. Read and show 
how important reading is by 



having all kinds of books, 
magazines and newspapers 
available at home. Turn off 
ifier^ for quiet reading 



X 



ume. --. 

6. Provide a quiet, 
weil-equipped study 
place at home. Have a 
dictionary, an atlas, and 
other reference materials 
available so Uiat children are 
best able to do their home- 
work. 

7. Establish a 
routine for playtime, 
meals, studying and 
bedtime. The importance 
of strucUire and time plan- 
ning are taught when you 
live according to a schedule. 



V ' 



8. Give even very 
young children "jobs" 
to do around the 
house. Developing good 
work habits early helps 
children apply self-disci- 
pline in school. 

9. Ask your children 
what they are studying 
and get to know their 



teachers. Your interest 
demonstrates that you think 
school is important 

10. Venture out to 
the library, museums, 
plays, craft shows and 
fairs. Interesting experien- 
ces expose you children to 
new diings and will help 
them absoib and tmderstand 



. their school woik. 

For the free booklet, 
"The Little Things Make a 
Big Difference," write to: 
World Book Educational 
Products, Station 14, 101 
Northwest Point Blvd., Elk 
Grove Village, III. 60007. 
(Send a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope.) 



Send Your Student 



School-Age Eyes 



Children's eyes are in 
constant use when in the 
classroom and at play, when 
a child's vision is not func- 
tioning properly, school- 
work and recreational 
activities suffer. If your 
child has dlfncullles in the 
following areas, consult 
your pediatrician: 

• Dizziness, headaches or 
nausea after doing close 
work. 

• Redness, frequent blinking 
or rubbing of the eyes. 

• Turning or crossed eyes. 

• Trouble identifying colors 
or recognizing objects that 
arc far away. 

• Tilting the head, squinting 
or looking tense while at- 
tempting to focus on an 
object. 

• Constantly silling too 
close to the TV. 

• Difficulty reading, includ- 
mg word or letter reversals, 
after second grade. 

• Unusual behavior or pos- 



ture while reading. 

• Squinting to focus on dis- 
tant objects. 

• Problems when throwing, 
catching or batting a ball. 

• Tendency to avoid reading 
and other close-up activi- 
ties, 

• Using finger to keep place 
while reading. 

If your chUd does need 
glasses, here are some rec- 
ommendations: 

• Encourage child's adjust- 
ment to glasses by letting 
him/her pick out Ihe 
frames. 

• Be sure to get plastic 
safety lenses. 

• Don't buy glasses or cor- 
rective sun glasses over the 
counter. These tend to be 
cheaply made and are dan- 
gerous because they break 
easily. 

• Let teachers know exacUy 
when new glasses should be 
worn. 







In Style 
Hair Sensation 




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(Route 176-near Hardee's) 

708-526-8940 







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Learn to earn or save money 

on your own return. 1 2 weeks. 

Morning & evening classes available. 

Fee for books and supplies. 



BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS 



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TAX SERVICE 



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Children Under 12 
Always 'lo 

589 Ela Road 
Lake Zurich, IL 60047 

Offers Exp.8/3U91 






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ttraction. 

708-438-9656 



CJC 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 21 



«a » I i i'i in i Tir I nrir i ^'f i ij i u'" ! ^ 



.--A, 



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1 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 




John Kelly and Tae 
Kwon Do Master 
Kurt Lang demoh- 
strote 'push hands.' 
Insert and below, 
Kelly and Kettle 
Heller perform the 
'form.' 



.■i^^,AiH^i«ji-i,S-- ■■ '■VM'irTW 



Less is more iii T'ai CM Ch^uan 



In our daily Uvcs, we're always being told 
that progress is gained by working harder, 
faster and longer. It's unheard of to be told 
wc should do less, move . slower, stop 
trying, and that this non-action is the real 
path towards progress. 

Wa-u/ei, the Chinese concept of non- 
action, seems contrary to our culture. Yet, 



miraculous because of the difPerencc It's 
made in their lives. 

Jan Bongiorno of Barrington, an 
enthusiastic proponent of Tai Chi Chuan, 
described herself as "pretty much an 
invalid" after undergoing spinal fusion 
surgery two and a half years ago. She was 
told by her doctor that she would never be 



It is one of .he Mother forms of medi- f'^,r-i*coum°„'t 



go 
out 



up stairs 
pulling 



abstract concepts that ^-'"'i%.^i i^nnw v/i iiiv./^i ^gai 

raTcWh'S:ra ta+'on try to take you out ZZ 

Chinese martid art, ^f ^^^^ ^^^^ ^ yai Chi EL.-'h'osayl'"' 

, , , . . . Bongiorno had 

you take the opposite always been active 

, . - , before the surgery 

route. YOU go so much and was looking for 

, . 1 I It 1 some type of mild 

into your body that you exercise, she was 

iryiufi , siiiu juua ^^^ ^wr>rN+. .>-*iK , h«i«««^^ Interested in learning 

Keuy. T'^ Chi ch'uan are eventuolly released the beatuifui 

instructor. "You have fp^.--, \\. 9 r/-^Kn I/qIKi movements she had 

to stop trying and just ''^''' ''• JOnn Keiiy seen performed on 

do. It's more difficult for people to do the streets in Chhia on a trip several years 
less." Students of T'ai Chi Ch'uan, which ago, but she didn't know wliat it was. She 
is considered the physical expression of wandered Into K.H. Kim's Tae Kwon Do 
the Tao (path or way), learn to follow the Academy in Lake Zurich asking if she 
natural path — the path of least resistance would be able to perform tae kwon do. 



which is also a form 
of exercise and a form 
of meditation said to 
harmonize the body, 
mind and spirit. 

"1 try to stay away 
from the word 
'trying'," said John 



— by developing chi, internal energy. 

After a couple of warm-up exercises In 
Kelly's class, a new student might be 
confused when Kelly checks his palms. 
Kelly is looking for evidence of chi. He 
says acupuncture is based on the 
existence of chi and is an accepted form of 



She was told the classes in T'ai Chi Ch'uan 
offered at the academy would be a better 
choice with her physical ailments. 

"I've been doing T'ai Chi Ch'uan since 
last October and now I can touch my 
knuckles to the floor. 1 feel wonderful," 
says Bongiorno. "My husband even says 1 



therapy. Therefore, chi exists. But Kelly look younger than I did two or three years 

also alms to prove the existence of chi to ago." 

students by helping them feel it and see it Another student of Kelly's, Marion 

Chi is experienced through a breathing Loughry of Algonquin, walked into class 

and visualization exercise which one day proclaiming to the other students 

culminates when the student's arms arc that T'ai Chi Ch'uan had saved her life, 

being lifted with eadi breath, without any Loughry was waiting for a stop light while 

physical effort. "T'ai Chi Ch'uan is practicing a relaxation technique, when 

movement without a lot of effort," says along came a jeep that slammed into her 

Kelly. After the exercise, Kelly tells the car. The steering column and the front 

student to look at his palms which are scat were broken, however, Loughry 

from the car without a 



mottled, a sign of chi. Instructor Kelly's 
palms show a more mottled look, but 
Kelly reminds the student that he's been 
practicing T'ai Chi Ch'uan for 12 years. 

T'ai Chi Ch'uan is a mysterious art. 
Some students will even claim that it's 



walked away 
bruise. 

Kelly was at fu-st skeptical of Lougliry's 
story, thinking she was probably just an 
over-enthusiastic new student, until she 
(Continued on page 28) 




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22 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, Augujt 16. 1991 



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Latilla's 'vital statistics' 

Occupation: Your guess is as good as mine. Right 
I now I am confused but if I was to take a guess, I am 

Hon's wife, the kids mom, my employers part-time 

bookstore saJesiady, my other employers Humor 

Columnist, an aspiring author of Latilla the Hon 

humor book, working on a sequel, praying nightly for 
1 the first book to sell. 

Birthday: Dec. 10 19?? a lady never divulges the year. 

Birthplace: No Idea. Gypsies left me at parents' 

doorstep is what I was told. 

Current home: Smack dab In the middle of LaLa 

Land. 
Marital status: Married to Hon half my life, he says he has 
been married all his life. 
Car: You can bet your booties it isn't a Cadillac! 
Working on: The sequel to "Over the Edge with Latilla the. Hon" sort of on par to 
Terminator 2. You see with the sequel book, Latilla comes back sane! 
The last good movie I saw was: Terminator 2 

All time favorite movie classics: "Gone With The Wind," "Wizard of Oz," "Giant." 
The book I've been reading: Mine, over and over again. It it the most hilarious book I 
have ever read and I can't understand why it hasn't sold yet 
Favorite performer: Elvis Presley and Judy Garland 
I'd give anything to meet: Garfield and John 
Favorite "pig out" food": New York Cherry ice cream 
If I could do it over I: Would have attended my high school reunion. 
The worst advice my mother gave me: Become a nun. 
People don't know that: I'm scared of flying, I'ni a sucker for hard luck stories. 
I knew I was grown up when I: Was in labor and was wishing 1 had taken my mother's 
advice to become a nun instead. 
My friends like mc because: I keep my word. 
Behind my back they say: How come she looks like she's 25? 
If Ilearncd one thing In life, it's: A merry heart docth good as a medicine! 
A great evening at home to me Is: Laying next to Mr. Hon, kissing ills shoulder blades and 
trying to wrestle the remote channel changer out of his hands.— by LAURA CtEGHORN 



BFainstorming Brown on the move 

She's ten and she's an author, a thkd baseman, home run hitter and gymnast. 
\n about ten years, she might be a nurse at Good Shepherd Hospital's nursery. 
She's Megan Brown and she's not Interested in boys. Yet 

If you see the short, blonde, blue-eyed, mischievous pet-lover cartwheeling on 
the street, know she is shy and not very talkative. Her words, largely, are saved for 
her stories. 

Brown vwites exclusively about animals — wild ones for the most part If she 
had her druthers, Browm would be a bird. "You get to fly and walk. Flying is fun," 
said the well-travelled fifth grader at Rockland Elementary High School in 
Ubertyville. Her favorite bird is the black, v*dte and orange puffin. 

Though most of Brown's stories average 10 to 15 pages, she has designs on 

longer worlw. Last week's story, about a squirrel that gets separated from its 

mother, is her first of its kind: it has a chapter and is 

illustrated. 

To get ideas, Brown brainstorms, usually with the 
television blaring. When she's bored, she writes; 
creating while lying on her stomach in front of the 
set 

Each story starts as a handwritten first draft before 
becoming a more permanent second draft on tlie 
computer. None of the stories are truthful. Brown 
said. "I just make stuff up," she said, tucking a 
bashful smile into her shoulder. 

Taking a creative writing class is not Brown's 
thing, so to speak. "1 don't like writing stories by 
assignment because you have to write what 
someone else tells you to write," she said, admitting 
that her writing interest was sparked by a class 
assignment 

In addition to her human family, Brown lives witli 
Cheers, a small poodle; Sarah, a box turtle who loves 
worms; RJ., a bird; two unnamed zebra fish and four 
small nameless frogs.— by DEDRA SCHWARTZ 




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Director 




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A year ago, Ihc Center for Coircciivc Eye Surgery 

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then, more than 200 of our patients have benefited 

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No-stilch cataract surgery is an 

example of our commitment to use 

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Suite 120 

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Lakeland Newspapers 23 



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celand Leisure 



Northlake dance 

Join the Northlake Singles on 
Friday, Aug. 16 at Hogan's In 
Antioch for dancing and 
socializing from 8 pm. to 12:30 
a.m. Cost is $3 for members, $5 for 
non-members. The club will be 
boarding the Spirit of Chicago for a 
dinner/dancing cruise. Call Rick 
Olson (708)872-4799 for further 
information. 



Night to remember 

The Lake County Family YMCA, 
located at 2000 Western Ave. In Waukegan 
gearing up for their second annual benefit 
dinner/dance gala. The event, "A Night to 
Remember II," is scheduled for 7 p.m. on 
Friday, Aug. 16 the Country Squire 
restaurant in Grayslake. Tlie benefit Is a 
fundraiser for YMCA youth programs. 
Tickets are $100 per person or $1,000 per 
table. Call (708)360-9622 for information 
and reservations. 

B n' B square dance 

McHenry Bachelors N' Bachlorettes 
Square Dance Club invites all single 
square dancers and couples to the 14tli 
anniversary dance, Friday, Aug. 16 to be 
held at the Johnsburg Community Club, 
2315 W. Church St., Johnsburg. Round 
dancing begins at 8 p.m. with cuers Tim 
and Sue Lippold; square dancing from 
8:30 to 11 p.m. to guest caller Dec Dee 
Dougherty, from Minnesota, No partner 
necessary. For information call (708)394- 
0632 after 7 p.m. 

Dancenter registration 

Registrations are now being accepted 




at Dancenter North, 540 N. Milwaukee 
Aye., Libertyville for the fall semester 
which begins on Sept. 9 and continues 
until Jan. 25. Dance classes include 
classical ballet, pointe, modern jazz and 
tap dancing, musical theatre classes are 
available for those interested in voice, • 
Suzuki violin and exercise enrichment 
classes include Yoga and body sculpting. 
There are classes for all ages and levels 
from ages three to adult. For further 
information call (708)367-7970. 

Hagle recital 

Pianist Matthew Hagle will play a 
program of Schumann, Schubert, 
and Brahms at 7:30 p.m on Friday, 
Aug. 16 at Goodfellow Hall of the 
Jack Benny Cultural Center in 
Waukegan, 39 Jack Benny Dr. 
Admission is free. Hagle is a fourth 
year student at the Peabody 
Conservatory in Baltimore, 
studying with Robert Weirich. 

Waukegan Symphony |^| 

The Waukegan Symphony Chorus, 
now in its 15th season has openings for 
tenors and basses and limited openings 
for sopranos and altos. The Chorus 
maintains a membership of around 140 
singers who perform as a single large 
chorus and specializes In smalt 
ensembles. Chorus Director Don 
Horisberger has been with the 
organization for 12 years and is assistant 
director with the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra chorus. An open rehearsal will 
be held on Aug. 27 at 7 p.m. at the First 
Presbyterian Church, 122 N. Utica St., 
Waukegan. Auditions will also be held 



Aug. 23 , 23 and Sept. 6, 7, 14. For 
informaUon caU (708)360-4742. 

Stage Two festival 

Stage Two Theatre Co., 11 N. 
Genesee St, Waukegan is hosting 
their first annual arts festival 
featuring local artists, dancers, 
musicians, singers, storytellers, 
actresses/actors, face-painters on 
Aug. 16, 17^ and- 18. Friday hours 
are from 6 to 10 p.m., Saturday, 
noon to 10 p.m., Sunday, noon to 7 




p.m. Scheduled events in the Stage Two 
Theater Complex are: Friday, 7 p.m. 
Ballet Folklorico, 8:15 p.m. Stage Two 
one-acts (adult material); Saturday, 4 
pm. Jean White children's music, 5:15 
p.m. "Two of Us" children's music, 7 
p.m. Tom Clark, storyteller Elizabeth 
Schaefer, singer; Sunday, 1:30 p.m. 
Tom Clark, storyteller, 3 p.m,. Stage 
Two one acts, 4:15 p.m. Admission to 
theater events Is $5 per event, seniors 
and students $4 per event, children 
under 12, $2 per event. Call (708)662- 
7088 for further details. 



ACROSS 
1. Play divisions, 

to Racine 
6. Inquire 
9. — relief 

12. Keen 

13. — Beta Kappa 

14. Cheer at a 
bulinght 

15. Type of print 

16. Driver's banc 
18. Shoe part 

20. Addict 

21, Fuss 

23. Edna — 
Oliver 

24. — Park. Colo. 

25. Weapon? 
27. Ivan and 

Pclcr 
29. Pruil 

31 . Somciimcs sour? 
35. Spear 

37. Plexus 

38. Piece of 
parsley 
"For — a 
jolly good,.." 
Posed 

Cnidc inclals 
Feel bitter 
indignation 

47. More sarcastic 
49. Nortii, Soulli 

and May 

Member of 

the ABA. 

Deface 

On one's Iocs 

55. Legal matter 

56, Wield 
diligently 




41 

43 

44 
45 



52. 

53. 

54. 



57, Comes in 

second 

DOWN 

1. Onager 

2. Guevara 

3. Dessert 
choice 

4. Leprechaun's 
turf 

5. Muscle 
twitch 

6. Fruit 

7. Word with 
soft 

8. Set of tools 

9. Raise 
10. Passage, 



in Paris 
11. Prophets 
17. Cavalryman 

in the 15(h 

century 
19. Relating to 
. a cereal 
21. 1 love (L.) 
22. Patriotic org. 
24. Blunder 
26. Register 
28. Nobel Prize 

writer and 

family 
30, Joke 

32. Companions 
of mortars 

33. Greek vowel 



34. After ready 
36. Fmit 

38. Ship equipment 

39. Chatter 

40. Musical 
pauses 

42. Flower part 

45. Gcniiinc 

40. — contendere 

48. Misciiicvous 
child 

49. Before 

50. Relatives of 
.ivcs. 




Answers on page 38 



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SCRATCH LEAGUES 

SUNDAY MENS CLASS! • 10:00 AM. - 4 PER TEAM 
MONDAY LADIES SCR. - 0:1 5 PM. • 3 PER TEAM 
WEDNESDAY MIXED SCR, - 9:30 PM. - 3 PER TEAM 



SENIOR' S BOWLING LEAGUES 

MOhJDAY - 1 :00 PM. - 4 PER TEAM - 1 S WEEKS 
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How to avoid travel "scams" 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

A week in Hawaii for $29. 5 nights in the Bahamas including 
a Cariblwan cruise for $169. Or the best of all, 'You have just 
won a free Florida vacation if you call 1-900 etc., within the 
hour." Sounds too good to be true, doesnt it? 

The Illinois Attorney General's Office bn consumer affairs 
offers one very logical bit of advice regarding offers such as 
these. "If it sounds too good to be tme, it is." 

Aside from that bit of common sense, there are some other 
signs of a travel 'scam". 

Most scams usually require the purchase of some kind of 
"reservation request voucher" before you are "eligible" to 
obtain the super low cmise price or the discounted condo on 
the beach. The company sells these vouchers as long as they 
can, and then picks-up and moves on to some new scam. 

In the few cases where travel is actually provided, there is 
always a catch. The most common one is a hotel package 
which requires the traveler to purchase air tickets at a greatly 
inflated cost. 

That free week in Florida and the Caribbean cruise you just 
won? You may get the week in Florida. You may even get the 
cruise. The resort you will be staying at will be a time-share 
condo where you will be required to sit through daily sales 
pitches and endure constant pressure to purchase a time- 
share. The cruise? It will be of the "One day cruise to 
nowhere" variety with a retail value of about $50. 

A new twist is to combine these scams with the use of '900" 
numbers. The 'Lucky Winner" is contacted by phone or mail 
and told to call 1-900-XXX-XXXX by a certain time for details. 
That 900 call is going to cost you anywhere from $5 to $25. 
even If you don't fall for the free week in Florida or the 
resen/alion voucher scam. 

As with the car industry, there are some real bargains in 
travel right now. But if someone said they could sell you a new 
$20,000 Buick for $1 ,000 you would expect a catch. 
Remember this the next time you see an unrealistic vacation 
price. 



fifffSWSffj^ff nM¥Si, 




2234 E. Grand LIndenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

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Aug 
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24 Lakeland Newspapors 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



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LaJkeliJFe 



Lindenfest '91 



Lindcnfcst '91 begins Thursday, Aug. 15 and continues through Sunday, Aug. 
18. The entertainments starts with the "Miss lindcnhurst Pageant" on Thursday 
evening. Friday will feature "Teen Night" with Steve D.J. as emcee. "Reflex" wUl 
be providing listening and dancing entertainment at the Main stage. Saturday 
morning wiil step off with the parade which begins at Beck Rd. and 2400 High 
Point Dr. and continue south on Beck Rd to Sand Lake Rd and finish at the 
Lindenhurst Village Hall grounds. Saturday's events include the "Lakes 
Community Area Band," "Those Funny Little People," "1st annual Lindenfest Pet 
Parade." The "New Colony Six" wiil be performing at the Main state at 8 p.m. and 
"The Shadows of Knight" at 10:15 p.m. Sunday kicks off with the liike Villa IWp. 
pancake breakfast at 7 am. and the day wiil continue with Garfield Goose and 
Co. the Jesse White Tumblers, magic by Simonsen and Co., and music by the "Plaid 
Fanatics." The Lindenhurst Men's Qub will be sponsoring the Midway by Windy City 
Amusement, bingo will be featured Friday, Saturday, euid Sunday. 

Boat parade 

The firet annual Venetian Night Boat Parade wUl take place at 8 p.m. on Saturday, 
Aug. 17 on Pistakee Lake at Grand Ave., in Fox Lake. Sponsored by the United States 
Coast Guard Auxiliary Division VI. Awards will be presented to the best decorated boats 
in two classes: over 20 feet and under 20 feet; first, second and tliiid place for each class 
size. Judging will be by Frank Meier, mayor of Fox Lake. For more information call 
MiUard Rutkoski (708)359-0797. 

Craft fair 

A craft fair is being planned by U.S. Vacation Resorts, 26303 W. Hwy 134, Ingleside, 
in conjunction with the Lake County Chapter of the United Way. The fair wiU be 
Saturday Aug. 17. Musical entertainment, refreshments and charity raffle will also be 
available. Call Barb Dalton at (708)546-7477 for further information. 

Memorial golf tournament 

Midlanc Country Club will host and co-sponsor the 1991 Rhonda Cashmore 
Memorial Golf Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 17. This full day of golf and entertainment 
was created in memory of local resident, Rhonda Cashmore, whose life tragically ended 
as a result of a car accident on April 29, 1990. Tee time for the tournament is 1 1 am. Fee 
per person is $100 and includes green fees and golf cart for 18 holes, course 
refreshments, dinner and dancing at Midland, guests are welcome at $25 per person, 



open bar cocktail hour, prizes for all golfers, and raffle drawings. Proceeds from the 
day's activities will provide post-secondary scholarship to students at Warren TWp. High 
School. 

Lambs golf outing 

The Seventh Annual Lambs Golf Outing will be held on Monday, Aug. 19 at 
Briarwood Country Qub in Deerfield. This fun-filled day includes 18 holes of golf, golf 
favors, lunch, cocktails, dinner for players and their guests, and chances to win prizes. 
This year, tennis and swimming will also be available at Briarwood. Companies can 
sponsor golf holes which will display a sign with the corporate sponsor's name, 
Sponsorship is $450 per hole. Entry fee per golfer is $450. All proceedsYrom the outing 
will benefit the Lambs. Call (708)362-4636 for further information. 

All-breed fun match 

An all-breed fun match sponsored by the Illinois Dog Clubs and Breeders Assn. will 
be held Sunday, Aug. 18 from 9 am. to 5 p.nL at Lambs Farm in LibertyvUle. Pure bred 
dogs of all ages are eligible for competition. Gate entries are $6. CaU (708)362-6774 for 
more information. 

Caravan of travel trailers 

Majestic Qass A motor homes will make their way into northern Lake (bounty as a 
caravan of travel trailers, fifth wheels and fold-down campers, snake their way through 
traffic heading toward Grayslake. Flashy conversion vans and mini motor homes are 
seen in large number heading for Lake County Fairgrounds on Wednesday, Aug. 21. This 
is the largest RV show in Illinois. The show wiU span Aug. 21 to 25 at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds. For further information call the Fairgrounds at (708)223-2204. 

*Great Books* training course 

The Great Books Foundation, a Chicago-based nonprofit educational organization, 
will hold a two-day Basic Leader Training Course in Barrington on Aug. 22 and 23 from 
9 am. to 3 p.m. This course is open to all teachers and volunteers committed to starting 
a Great Books reading and discussion groups for students in kindergarten through high 
school. Registration for the course can be made by calling Carol Lee at (708)381-0311. 

Skip's car sliow 

The seventh annual Skip's Graffiti Gold Sunday Car Show is slated for Sept 1 from 8 
am. to 4 p.m. at the Lake County Fairgrounds. More than 600 showcars and a swap meet 
will be available. General admission is $5. Call (708)682-8792 for more information. 



ALL MOVIES & TIIVIES START 

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FRIDAY 8-16-91 I 

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199T 




WHY HAKE EKSUSES WHEN 
YDU CAN MAKE A PHONE GALL 

The next time you catch yourself making excuses why you don't need to get in 
touch with your doctor, try something else instead. Talk with a trained registered nurse. 

One who will assess your symptoms, answer your questions and 
help you determine whether it's necessary to see your doctor. And 
if you don't have one, they will refer you to the right physician or 

specialist for your needs. ASK-A-NTJRSE* is free, confidential, and 

it's available 24 hours a day 365 days a year. In fact, there's no ASK*A*NURSE 
excuse at all not to make a note of our phone number. (708) 244-5900 

. , - . , Your Source For 

Provicied as a free communiiy service by: Health Care Answers- 

Saint Therese Medical Center 





A Division of l-nuiciscan Slsurs 
llcallh Girc Curpornlion 



O l<4K<l Hrlriijl SiMrni% (>iiMi|i, tni .VSKA-M HM it J rvpHlriiil It jiUiiuil. iil Kifriul s\Mi'nit (rriui|t, Im . 



Friday. August 16. 1991 



Lakelgnd Newspapers 25 „ 



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■rr^u-y.~Tr H* 







\^(A \A7r»rlH 'Earthly possesions' 

5/ ^^ A W W \— ^ JL A \-A toM "Earthly Possessions," the 1977 Arine IVler novel-turned-play making Its 




Hurt's really hurtin' 
in latest trauma flick: 

Hollywood is Into professionals turning over new leaves 
this season. First we have Harrison Ford changing from a 
bloodsucking, tyrannical lawyer into a loving, caring 
individual after getting shot in a hold-up in "Regarding 
Henry." 

Now we have William Hurt adopting the old adage 
"Physician cure thyself," in "The Doctor." 

The comparison stops here as "The Doctor" is the better 
movie of the two. 

Hurt, no stranger to Academy Award nominations, Is 
being touted as one of this year's leading contenders for this 
one. 

He is reunited with director Rhanda Haines who guided 
him In the critically acclaimed, somewhat similar, "Children 
of a Lesser God," with the same tcclinical success. 'WftlUain Hurt 

The storyline has Hurt, a successful heart surgeon, coming down with throat cancer 
and learning first hand what It's like to be on the otlier side of a scalpel. 

As tlie plot unfolds we see Hurt going through the traumas connected with serious 
illness and learning that patients are more tlian names on a bcdchart. 

Elizabeth Perkins plays another cancer patient and Christine Lahtl is Hurt's wife. 

Hurt's laid back acting style, the style that has labeled him as one of today's most 
"realistic" talents, has a tendency to botlier this reviewer at times. 

In the same vein that they tag Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Swartzeneggcr "bigger 
than life," Hurt sometimes slips Into being "smaller than life,' and we feel tliat we are in a 
race to see who falls asleep first, the actor or the reviewer. 

"The Doctor" is another one of those pictures that is technically almost perfect, from 
the direction to the acting, etc 

But like so many of these "critics' delights," many people have to be in a particular 
mood to enjoy all this excellence or a flick officlanado. The latter are not usually found In 
the average movie audience. 

Movies are one of our top sources of entertainment and we were not "entertained" by 
"The Doctor." We were educated. We were emotionally touched. We sometimes fidgeted 
in our scats wondering when this predictable plot would come to a predictable and 
morally satisfying conclusion. 

We give "ilie Doctor," four stars on its directorial and dramatic merits and two stars 
on tlie enjoyment scale. Again, maybe you have to be in the mood! — by GLORIA DAVIS 



IeTitertai 



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"Earthly Possessions," the 1977 Arine lyier novel-turned-play making Its 
premiere on the stage of Chicago's Steppenwolf Theater, Is a multi-faceted 
jewel — rich in prosaic language and peopled with compelling, if sometimes 
bizarre, characters whose complicated lives unfold like petds on a rose. 
Deftly adapted and directed by Frank Galati, the play combines the efforts of a 
seasoned cast with some wonderful stagecraft. 

It's a story of an unusual journey taken by a 35-year-old long-suffering wife and 
mother who eventually comes to a sense of self- awareness and recognizes "never 
having had the knack of knowing I was happy \^di!le happiness was going on." 
Joan Allen Is wonderful as Charlotte Emory, the unfulfilled woman wrestling with 
a world that has so many ways of tying a person down. Her "dream" is to hit the 
open road with nothing but a pair of running shoes and her $100 In travelers' 

checks. What she discovers is a far less ordered world when she's taken hostage during a 

bank holdup and forced to flee the state. 

. Molly Regan also does a noteworthy job In her role as a second voice, narrating 

Chariotte's deepest thoughts. 

Kevin Anderson is convincing as Jake, the mixed-up small-time crook who must come 

to terms with a life of crime and settling down to tho responsibilities that come with being 

a father. Sally Murphy Is the perfect 17-year-old airhead girl friend ("My sign is hearts. 

What's yours?") 

Rondi Reed, in the role of Charlotte's overbearing mother, steals the scene more than 
once: first made up to be hideously 
rotund (as viewed through the eyes of 
her daughter) and later, aged and rail- 
thin, dying of cancer on a hospital bed. 

Black-and-white slides projected 
onto a huge screen, depicting the bank 
robbery, Charlotte's earlier abduction 
as a child and various landmarks 
marking her latest journey all enhance 
the drama. 

"Earthly Possessions" is nicely 
done and will continue through Sept. 
8. Ticket information is available at 
(312)335-1650.— byTOM WITCOM 




Kevin Anderson and Joan Allen 



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26 Lakeland Newspapers 



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SUIN30AY 



l*Day at the Harbor* 

The League of Women Voters of Lake County is 
I sponsoring "A Day at the Harbor" on Sunday, Sept. 
15 from noon to 4 p.m. at North Point Marina, 
Winthrop Harbor. Admission is $20 for adults, 
teens (10-18) $10, children three to 9, $5. Major 
attractions will be a barbecued dinner from 1 to 3 
p.m., silent auction from noon to 3 p.m., nature 
wallc and nature games for children at .12:15 p.m., 
swimming at the beach, fishing, volleyball, trick 
kite-flying demonstration at 1:30 p.m., kite-flying 
'contest at 3:15 p.m., sandcastle buildbig contest, 
and a talk on the history of the harbor by Jim LaBellc, 
harbormaster. Reservations must be made by Sept. 5. Call 
(708)945-1937 for further information and reservations. 



mmmm^mmmmmmmmm^mmm 



Big Brothers/Big Sisters 

Learn more about the program at the Volunteer 
Orientation meetings on Monday, Aug. 19 at the Big 
Brother/Big Sister oflice located at 3838 Grandview Ave., 
Gurnee, from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information and to 
make your orientation reservations call (708)360-0770. 

*Russia and the West' 

Jerry Hough, Ph.D., author of "Russia and the West: 
Gorbachev and the Politics of Reform," and professor of 
political science at Duke Univ., wiU present a free lecture at 
the College of Lake County at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 
19. Issues and changes related to Soviet economic reform 
will be the focus of of Hough's presentation at the CLC 
auditorium, 19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake, In 
addition to Hough's lecture, CLC wiU sponsor a panel 



discussion, "International Students at liiinols Community 
Colleges,^ at 1 p.mu Thursday, Aug. 22 in room C-003. Gary 
A. rsrael,^xecutive director of the 111. Community College 
Board, will be the guest at the discussion moderated by 
President Daniel J. LaVista, For information call (708)223- 
6601, ext 562 or 550. 

Tower of attorney' 

Kim Schroii of Atty. General Roland Burris' ofQce will 
give a presentation of the durable power of attorney for 
health care at 1 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 19 at Hawthorn 
Lakes retirement community. Hawthorn Lakes is located 
at 10 E, Hawthorn Pkwy., Vernon Hills. For more 
information call (708)367-2516. 

Ducks Unlimited banquet 

The Lake Shore Chapter of Ducks Unlimited is having 
its annual banquet, auction, raffle at the Waukegan Yacht 
Club on Monday, Aug. 26. Social hour and auction item 
viewing will start at 5 p.m. followed by a 7 p,m. diimer. 
Tif-kets for this annual seflout event are $45 and include a 
jne-year membership to Ducks Unlimited. Call George 
Minarikat (708)623-0084 for further information. 



TmITT^cTTM^ 



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Meet SBDS! 



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708-S26-5541 



Montessori open house 

Montessori Country Day School, 200 W. Maple, 
Mundeiein, is hosting an open house on Tuesday and 
Wednesday evening, Aug. 27 and 28 from 5 to 8 p.mu The 
school serves ciiUdren preschool age tlirough sbrth grade 
and is currently accepting applications. The Montessori 
Method fosters effective learning habits, decision making 
skill includes exercises to encourage memory, confidence, 
social awareness, and positive attitudes. Parents and 
children are invited to attend the open house or call 
(708)949-8844. 

Stress management 

The Alliance for the Mentally 111 of Lake County 
(AMl/LC) will hold is general meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 
21 at 7 p.nL at St. Lawrence Episcopal Church, 125 W. 
Church St Libertyvllle. Guest speaker will be Larry Brooks, 
a licensed clinical social worker. He practices at Victory 
Memorial Hospital. He v/Wl discuss "Stress Management 
for the Care Givers of the MentaUy 111. Call (708)249-1515 



for further Information. 

Cardparty 

The Barrington Women's Club will sponsor a card 
party and luncheon on Wednesday, Sept 18 at Wynstone 
Cotmtry Club, Rte. 12 in Harrington, All types of cards will 
be played which begins at 10 a.m. Coclctails and buffet 
luncheon will be served at noon. Non-members are 
welcome. The card party is being held as a benefit for the 
Philantropic and Scholarship Fund. Cost is $25 and 
reservations can be made by calling Gwen (708)382-2439 
or Jean (708)359-6335. 



Water quality 

"The Effect of Water Quality on the Family" wUl be 
presented Thursday, Aug. 22 at 1 p.m. by the Univ. of 
lllbiols specialist Marge Sohn. Lake County Health Dept 
representative. Chuck Catlin will be the local 
representative explaining how and where to have water 
tested and special concerns of area water supplies. Catlin 
will discuss how water supplies become contaminated 
and some of the warning signs to watch for. The program 
will be held at the Lake County Cooperative Extension 
Educational Auditorium, 100 S. Hwy. 45, Grayslake. Call 
(708)223-8627 for further information. 



Nursing homes 

"How to Choose a Nursing Home," a video to help you 
make an informed decision about nursing home 
placement, is available for overnight viewing free of charge 
by calling Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, 
Lindenhurst, (708)356-5900 or Victory Memorial Hospital, 
(708)360-4246. 

Austrian picnic 

An Austrian picnic is set for noon, Aug. 25 at Rte. 120 
and Lily Lake Rd., McHcnry. Admission is $2.50 per 
person, children under 16 are free. Menu includes roasted 
chicken and pork. CaU (708)676-1554 or (708)677-0926 for 
further information. 

WON sets meeting 

Widowed Outreach Network of Lake County will meet 
on Aug. 25 at Condell Medical Center, Libertyvllle. The 
program vjHH be by a Behone Audiologish on hearing aids. 
CaU (708)362-2900 for details. 



HOST FAMILIES NEEDED NOW! 




Dijana from Yugoslavia 



Dijana from Yugoslavia and many other 
international exchange students, are arriving in late August 
and urgently need host families in ILLINOIS for the 
1991/92 school year. Dijana is very active in 
Yugoslavian folk dancing and likes ^o play tennis. 
She is a persistent and diligent student and Is 
described as sociable and friendly. 

Please call today if your family can host Dijana or 
one of our other international exchange students. All of our 
exchange students speak English, are good students, and are 
eager to learn about America. 

SHARE! your life with a boy or girl eager to join your 
family. 



CALL NOW FOR INFORMATION: 
(708) 628-8778 or 1-800-321-3738 



A non-profit student 
exchange program 




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H&R Block to Offer 

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Thousands of people are 
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H&R Block, the world's largest 
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Experienced Block instructors 
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Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 27 



^"' 



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New hybrid fish make tasty table fare 



The Muskegum Watershed- in 
eastern Ohio lies in the rolling foothills 
of the Appalachian Mountains. Its 10 
man-made lakes are stocked to 
emphasize favored angler species and 




include most better known game fish, 
panfish and bottom feeders. 

Our stay at Atwood Lake Resort al- 
lowed us to sample a new hybrid fish 
strain, the saugeye. This is a product of 
fertilizing tiie eggs of sauger with those 
of the walleye in state fish hatcheries. 



The fish developed cannot reproduce 
and has no spawning tendencies. This, 
it is thought, makes the product a 
sexless, continuous feeder and fast 
grower, ultimately able to exceed the 
size of either parent. 

Interstraining and genetic 
manipulation of fish, with their good 
and bad results, convince hatchery 
specialists that as their knowledge 
increases, they discover how little they 
actually luiow of nature's mysteries. 

Don Weaver was my saugeye guide 
late one afternoon. He worJcs nearby 
and his wife and son share his fishing 
enthusiasm as they summer in the 
attractive trailer park, on the water's 
edge, and have for 16 summers. 
Saugeye in Lake Atwood are planted 
and not many anglers know they are 
there nor what fishing fun they can 
create along with tasty table fare. 

Jigging worms and leeches over se- 
lected flats and drop-off areas, we 
moved with the wind helped by an 
electric trolling motor. By 9 p.m., 4 
hours later, we had taken about 16 fish. 



Friday 
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7:00-JttOOp.ni. 
Depart, from American 
Logron. RL 12, Fax bke 

Full Dinner Train 



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Saturdays 

Depart. 

Fox Lake Depot 

1:004:00 p.m. 

6:00-9XK)p.m. 

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Sunday 

Depart 

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12:15-3:15 

Brunch Train 

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Information: 800-279-9009 
Group Sales (608) 755-2274 

Reservations (608) 755-2277 or 

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Ham or Turkey 

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Illinois has Httle experience with 
saugeye. Bolan Lake, down in 
Hamilton County, had some 4,000 
annual experimental plantings of two- 
inch fingerllngs In the fall of '89. Ihese 
have shown yearly growth of about 7 
inches but are not yet an angler 
attraction. 

Saugeye may not become the 
bonanza conservation folks hoped for, 
but my guide's wife, Cheryl, took an 
Ohio award from Atwood Lake In June 

Tai Chi— 

(Continued fi»m page 22) 
told him what the police officer on the 
scene said. "The police ofHcer asked if I 
was asleep. He said I should have gone 
through the window," said Loughry. 

Loughry, who has six grandchildren 
living with her and cleans houses for a 
living, said she became interested in T'al 
Clii Ch'uan as a way to reUeve stress and 
she says it works. " I used to take a lot 
more aspirin," she says. 

Loughry is not new to relaxation 
techniques and had practiced yoga for 
many years. "Yoga relaxes you, but I didn't 
feel like 1 had a lot of energy afterwards. 
But after T'ai Chi my adrenalin is really 
going. It's very rejuvenating." 

Kelly is cautious about citing dramatic 
cases as evidence of T'ai Chi Ch'uans's 
benefits. "It makes it sound like I'm 
selling snake oil and that everyone should 
expect Incredible results." However, he 
has also experienced great benefits from 
practicing the art. 

Since childhood, Kelly had suffered from 
recurring back problems. He tried pain 
pills; he tried physical therapy. "The 
physical therapy was like some kind of 
Medieval torture. It only made it worse," 
he says. Then in 1979 while studying for 
his master's degree at the University of 
Wisconsin at Milwaukee, he found T'ai 
Chi Ch'uan. "For the first time, my back 
was getting better and it's continued to 
get better." 

When T'ai Chi Ch'uan was actually 
created is difficult to document "So much 
of Chinese history Is a quagmire. Some 
say it was started 300 years ago, others say 
It was much longer than that," says Kelly. 
The art was brought to the United States 
in 1964 by Cheng Man-Ching, a man 
better known in China for his calligraphy. 

Kelly teaches the Yang style of T'al Chi 
Ch'uan which is said to be the softest and 



of '90 with a 23.4 Incher, so It appears 
they do have a future under suitable 
local conditions. 

Some believe saugeye arc just " a 
flash in the pan." We can verify that 
they are flashy in a frying pani 

For a better explanation of flaish In 
the pan, however, check the Midwest 
Hunting and Outdoor Show which runs 
Aug. 16 to 18, at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds in Grayslake. 



most health-oriented style. A series of 13 
movements are taught to students until 
they can eventually perform the form. 

The form Is a very slow, continuous 
exercise in which each movement grows 
out of the prior movement. Although it 
looks easy, practitioners are quick to point 
out that it's not It requires diat a person 
maintain a state of relaxation and be 
extremely aware, concentrating, ' 
meditating on every body movement. 
"Other forms of meditation try to take you 
out of your body. In Tai Chi, you take the 
opposite route. You go so much into your 
body that you are eventually released 
that it is counterproductive when 
instructors only teach the external 
movements, //, without teaching the 
internal experience of chi. Basically, Kelly 
says that if a fighter who had only learned 
It came against a fighter who had learned 
chi, the chi fighter would beat the I i 
fighter anyday. "If you teach fighting from 
the beginning the student won't learn to 
relax enough. Those who come to learn 
fighting, usually learn more slowly than 
those who come into this openly." 

As a martial art, T'ai Chi Ch'uan Is non- 
confrontational, "It starts with yielding 
Instead of confronting," says Kelly. A 
demonstration of push hands is hardly the 
high-action drama that often comes to 
mind when one thinks of the martial arts. 
The spar does not look like a fight. The 
fighters are in constant contact and are so 
highly aware of each other that they know 
the precise moment when the partner is 
off-center and can literally be thrown 
across the room by his own momentum. 
Kelly says that In its highest form, tills 
non-confrontational martial art could 
beat out all the others. The words of Lao- 
Tzu, a famous Taoist philosopher, sums 
up this theory well, "The soft and pliable 
wUl defeat the hard and strong." 



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SHOPS FOR SHOP HOURS 

SERVICES: 

• Shocks < Struts • Exhaust 
• Alignment/ Suspension • Brakes 



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Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. 

Offer expires 9-30-91. 

Offer good only at participating Mtdas shops. 




4* 






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Friday, August 16, 1991 






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Sparkle Your Gems 

Are your gems sparkling 
less? Maybe they need a 
brisk cleaning. It's simple. 
For hard stones, such as 
diamonds, amethysts, 
rubles and sapphires, use 
any of the following 
cleaners and a soft bristle 
,brush: 

■jit Ammonia • Tea Kettle' 
, Steam • Mild Soap • Over- 
the-counter cleaners • 
Tootlipaste (It Just sounds 
like an old wives' tale, but 
it really works), 
?For softer stones- such as 
^emeralds, opals and 
jpearls- it's best to stick 
^Avith soapy warm water. 
sNever clean these stones 
with hard cleaners such as 
Ammonia. It could dry 
them out. Consider that 
iippais are 10% water, and 
Icmeral ds- which co ntai n 
oil-could lose some color 
*if dleaned with anuTionia. 

0Hndows won't stay 

^Propping a window open 



is a nuisance. The window 
will stay up on Its own if 
you nail a tension device 
such as a metal butterfly 
sold at window repair 
companies to the jamb, or 
nail a window spring Into 
the sash. 

Crank-out window 

that won't crank 

More times than not, what 
seems like a broken crank( 
and lots more work to 
repair) is nothing more 
than a loose screw. Look 
for a tiny setscrew at the 
base of tlic handle.With 
the handle In place on the 
stem of the cranking 
mechanismi, turn the 
screw clockwise until the 
handle is tight enough to 
^.tum. ■■;, 

Open joint in 

wood trim 

As a house settles, so do 
all the components 
Inside. Small gaps that 



may appear at the joints 
of wood trim around 
.doors and window 
disappear quickly if you 
fill tiiem with colored 
wood putty sold at paint 
stores. 

Drafly windows 
Cut the chill' from old 
windows and the agony 
from high heating bills 
with removable caulking 
cord-a putty like string 
available at hardware 
stores and home centers. 
Just poke pieces of the 
cord into any gap between 
the window frame and the 
wall or even the window 
and its frame and the wall 
or even the window and 
its frame- wherever you 
feel a draft or see an 
openhig. Come spring, it's 
a simple matter to take 
the cord out 



/TNiT.'m.-.~j 



Paint on hardware 

Sometimes ail the paint 
stripper in the world 
won't take old paint off 
door and window 
hardware. But trisodium 
phosphate (TSP) might, 
just let the hardware soak 
overnight in a solution of 
one part TSP and five 
parts water. If your home 
center doesn't sell TSP 
.(it's restricted in some 
areas because it's not 
biodegradable), try 
soaking the hardware in 
plain water. It may take as 
long as a week, but 




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eventually it will come 
clean. 

Furniture 

Water rings on furniture, if 
the ring is white, it has 
penetrated no deeper 
than the fmish. Spray on a 
stain lifter such as Blush 
Out (sold at paint stores), 
testing first in an 
inconspicuous spot. Wipe 
off with a clean rag. ( If 
the ring is black, the stain 
has gone through the 
finish to the wood and 
you'll have to strip the 
piece.) 

Nascent 



What's the point of a 
cedar chest ( or closet, or 
drawer) If the moths can't 
smell the cedar? To 
restore the scent, lightly 
sand the cedar wood with 
a fine-grade sandpaper. 
Vacuum up the dust and 
Vkripe the inside with a tack 
cloth. 

Fireplace-screen 

Hard-to-open-or-close 
screens may Just need a 
little lubrication. Spray 
the pulley chain with WD- 
40. If it still sticks, the 
mechanism is probably 
bent out of shape. 






I i 



(I 



i 




From 

INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICE 

AtKoExtreChara«Call 

414-657-S133 

OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS 
6209 22nd AVE. 



The French Collection 

Intricate carvings on solid ftardwood 
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(Moire 
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'E^cpert tailorings coupled loitli a 
magnificent selection cffaSrics By (Peltiers 
prcfessional design consultants. *Uiese are 
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Sat. 9:30-5:00 p.m. 
Sun. Noon-4:00 p.m. 



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No Charge For Deiivery & Set-up 



li 16, 1991 



Frlday.Augu$tl6, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 29 






^«JC» 



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lO'O'X 16'4" 



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Details in 
Decorating 



maa^&e a. k&o/ /ofea ?. . . Uast ae£ Cofoc^n 




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Q. I would like some ad- 
vice on how to brighten 
litty basement. It has very 
dark wall paneling and 
very dark carpeting. I was 
wondering if I could paint 
the paneling? It Is not 
true wood paneling, but a 
finished wood product. I 
would like to do 
something Inexpensively, 
and of course, without 
requiring the removal of 
the paneling. 
Kathy Kernan, 
West Miltmore 

A, Considering that your 
paneling is the 4x8 sheet 
type, refinishing it isn't a 
good Idea. However, you 
can certainly brighten up 
your basement by using a 
lining paper, sold through 
almost any wallpaper 
store. Vou put this paper 
up first to cover any 
grooves or crevices that 
would show up through 
the decorative paper that 
you would choose to go 
over it. Choose sometiiing 
light and possibly tex- 
tured. A fabric backed 
vinyl would be a good 



choice for durability. 

Q. My husband and I live 
in a townhouse over- 
looking a marina. The 
structure Is covered with 
cedar shingles, and the 
Interior drywall with 
rough cedar beams. We 
began redecorating a few 
years ago with traditional 
furniture and then real- 
ized that the structure 
and surroundings of our 
home evoked a more ca- 
sual feeling. We own ac- 
cent tables that are 
beveled glass, marble, 
and Iron. Our color 
scheme presently In- 
cludes beige, mauve, and 
pale green. Our question 
is, how do we soften the 
look to be more In line 
with the architecture and 
location? 
Laura Hall, Wlnnetka 

A. The key to softening an 
interior space is to take a 
look atthe soft items that 
arc available, such as 
window treatments, up- 
holstery, and carpeting. 



Since your architecture is 
contemporary and your 
furniture is traditional, 
the easiest way to soften 
your interior is with over- 
stuffed upholstery. 
Choose a fabric that has a 
soft appearance for a 
more traditional look or 
chenille for a more 
contemporary look. Now 
continue your color 
scheme in the fabric you 
choose for the window 
treatments. Choose a flo- 
ral print for a traditional 
look, choose a casement 
fabric for a contemporary 
appeal. The window 
treatment should be soft 
in appearance. Do not use 
pinch pleats or swags and 
Jabots. Instead, hang flat 
panels with a rod pocket 
at the top over a large 
wooden pole. This works 
well for both styles. You 
do not mention your 
floorcovering; but, if it's 
not carpeting, you will 
need a large area nig. 
Plants can also be used to 
soften a room in either 
setting. Choose plants 
that are light and airy. 



such as ferns and palms. 

Q. We have moved Into a 
15-year-old home that 
has a colonial brick fire- 
place In the family room. 
Our furniture and the 
look we desire Is 
contemporary. How can 
we change the look of the 
fireplace at minimal cost? 
D.H., Long Grove 

A. Simply paint the brick 
solid white or with a 
whitewash effect Or for a 
more permanent and de- 
sirable look, consider 
covering the fireplace area 
lyith new wailboard and 
then paint it white. 



Q. I have limited counter 
space In my kitchen. My 
cookbooks are kept in 
another room, and In 
drawers hidden away. I 
would like to display 
them so they are more at 
hand, but yet I want them 
to look goodi Helpl 
J. D./ Arlington Hts. 



A. One way would be to 
install a decorative shelf 
on a large wall about 14" 
to 16" from the coiling.; 
Bookends would help 
keep the books from 
falling and perhaps other- 
accessories such as a plate 
collection. Candlesticks 
and/or English ivy in a^ 
brass or ceramic container? 
would achieve great re- 
sults. Another solution, 
would be a small bakers 
rack- 



k: 



Carolyn Plawlnski Is an 
Interior designer with 
over 18 years In the de- 
sign filed. Her firm, 
Wlldwood Design Group/: 
Ltd. caters to all decorat- 
ing needs, especially In 
the new construction! re- 
decorating and renovat- 
ing areas. Questions of' 
general Interest can be 
sent to Plawlnski in care 
of Lakeland Newspapers! 
30 Whitney St., 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 1 




MC WS BEST SELECTION A^ 
BEST PBICE m CABPET, YMl 

CEBAmCADTIlE. 



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SMALL OR BIG 



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CERAMIC TILE - Florida, Marazzi 

VINYL - Armstrong, Mannington, Congoleum 



HARDWOODS - Hartco & Bruce 
CARPETS - Abbey Carpets 




Hwy. 31 (Greenbay) to Hwy. 11 
East corner Lathrop and 11 in Eimwood Plaza 



Hw/.tl -^ 



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Hwy. 1] 






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3701 Durand Ave., Raeine 



414-554-4645 



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Friday,Augu»tl6, 1991 



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Home 








10' 0^ XI 6' 4 



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Ci'QftS, Etc. ... Randee Rian 



Bouquet of dough art zinnias 

Autumn is here. My inspiration for this dough art 
craft project has come from the garden — colorful late 
summer zinnias. Easy to make with simple kitchen 
supplies, these beauties will have longer staying power 
than those that have been freshly picked. 

Begin with the dough art recipe: 

4 cups flour 

1 cup salt 

1 1/2-2 cups hot water 

Combine ail ingredients in a mixing bowl. Knead 
until smooth on a lightly floured board or take an easy 
way out — use your food processor for the mixing and 
kneading stages. The dough will last a few weeks 
refrigerated iiini a plastic bag, more flour may be needed 
after it has been stored. 

To shape the blossoms, follow these instructions, 
varying the size of the blossoms and the length of the 
stems. Each flower is composed of notched, flattened 
disks, as many as are needed, depending on the size of 
the blossom you're making. Each flower disk should be 
slightly smaller than the previous one. 

Cut a piece of foil about 4" square. The blossom will 
be assembled and baked on the square on a coolde 
sheet Roll a walnut-sized portion of dough Into a ball 
and flatten with the side of your hand to form a circle 
about 1/4" thick and 2" in diameter. 

To make the disk notched, fold a strip of lightweight 
cardboard to make a sharp crease or use a point of a 
'star' cookie cutter to cut out small notches around the 
circle. Take another ball of dough and form a bafl 
slightly smaller than a walnut. Flatten and notch as 




before. Lift the smaller circle by sliding a spatula under 
it and place on the larger one, centering it carefully. 
With a pen cover, cut a small circle of dough from the 
center of two-layered disks by pressing down and lifting 
out this center with a skewer tip. Make other disks to 
form the blossom flower. On the last disk which is 
smaUer than the others, repeat but do not cut out a 
center circle. Instead, use a pencil eraser to make a 
depression in the center causing the petals to raise 
slightly around the edges. 

Bake blossoms about 15 minutes at 325** F. and 
remove from the oven. Make a hole in the underside of 
the blossom by pressing it with a skewer. Do not stick 
the skewer all the way through the blossom. Return it to 
the oven and bake 35 minutes more at 325" F. or until 
hard. 

To assemble the flowers use tlie sharp end of a 
skewer to reopen the hole if it's been closed during tlie 
baking time. With a hot glue gun apply glue and place 
skewer firmly into center hole, being careful not to 
break the center piece on the other side. Hold skewer 
until hot glue cools and dries. Make leaves with green 
crepe paper, paint the zinnias in shades of orange, red 
and yeUow. Spray and cover the leaves and blossoms 
with two coats of clear acrylic spray using the directions 
on the can. 

Arrange the flowers when dry and enjoy your 
everlasting bouquet. Tills one won't need water. 





Avoid costly repair 




If you haven't faced up 
to the fact that your home 
needs regular inspections 
to locate potential trouble 
spots, you could find 
yourself facing costly re- 
pair bills in the ftiture. 



home checkup now 



Here's a quick guideline 
for home inspections. 

In the basement, check 
for signs of damage in 
posts, sills, joints and 
other woodwork caused 
by termites or other de- 



structive insects. Make 
sure all exposed water 
pipes are protected from 
freezing. If the foundation 
waUs are of solid concrete, 
they should be examined 
for cracks; if they are of 



unit masonry, the joints 
should be examined to 
determine if mortar has 
loosened or fallen out. 

If your roof is slate, tile, 
wood shingles or 
composition shingles, see 



if any pieces are broken, 

missing, loose, warped or 
decayed. Check the attic 

ceiling for stains indicat- 
ing leakage. If repairs are 
in order, an easy-to-use 



caulking compound can 

help. Instead of putting 
up with the mess of 

caulking guns, look for the 
kind that comes in pre- 

shaped rolls. 



i 




No dosin 





Citibank Is offering great deals 
on a wide variety of home equity loons, 
and applying for one couldn't be easier 

We don't burden you witti points 
or closing fees. We will offer you the 
advantage of potentially tax-deductible 
interest on whichever hon^e equity loan 
you choose* So if you've been consider- 
ing financing for home improvements, 
debt consolidation, education, a new 
car, or other major purchases, Citibank 
has the home equity loan to suit 
your needs. 

To find out more, visit our branch. 

NOT JUST BANKING, CmBANKING 



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IDEA6 






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Oihcr Important Information you should know: 



475 W. Liberty St., Wauconda, Illinois 

70«-52©-S622___ 






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• General Electric Lamps 

• Nutone Intercoms 

• Ceiling Fans 

• rioor S" Table Lamps 



• Decorative Fixtures 

Drogresslight Fixtuies 

• Halo Track Lighting 

• Garden and Outdoor 



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Grand lighting 'Galleries 



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Monday thru Friday 9 lo 6, Solurdays 9 lo 4 



I^mII 



WAUKEGAN "aVLl^r 336-0010 

Monday thru Frtdoy 9 to 5, Saturdays 9 to 3 



Friday. August 16. 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 31 



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iO'O^X 16' 4 





Too mzicfz zucchini? 

Yes, I was over-enthusiastic when I planted those 
small innocent-looking zucchini and yellow summer 
squash plants last spring. For years my garden plans 
have not included these squashes; this year I thought it 
might be fun. Let's just say 1 have some very happy 
producers. So, for those of you who also have a 
bountiful supply, I offer some new suggestions. 

Zucchini-Tomato Aspic Ring 

2 envelopes unflavored gelatin 
1/2 cup cold water 
4 cups tomato juice 

1 Tbis. lemon Juice 

2 tap. onion, grated 
1 tsp. dried basil 
1 cup zucchini, sliced 
1 cup zucchini, diced 
1/2 cup green onion with tops, diced 
1/2 cup green pepper 

1/2 cup green olives, sliced 

cottage cheese 

paprika 

Soften gelatin in cold water. Heat tomato juice; add 
gelatin and stir until dissolved. Add seasonings and 
mix well. Allow to cool. Cover bottom of oiled ring mold 
with 1/4" layer of gelatin mixture. Place mold in 
refrigerator and chill until gelatin is set. Place a layer of 
thin zucchini slices on top of molded gelatin. Layer 
with 1/4" liquid gelatin, chill and allow to set. Combine 
remaining vegetable ingredients. Stir in remaining 
gelatin; mix well hnd pour into mold. Chill, unmold 
and fill ring with cottage cheese, if desired. Sprinkle 
cheese with paprika. Serves 8. 




Cajun squash 

The delicate flavors of squash go well with a variety 
of herbs, seasonings and other vegetables. This Cajun 
taste will be a great accompaniment with summer 
grilled meats. Be sure and add enough hot sauce. 

1 medium onion, sliced 

1 clove of garlic, minced 

1 TbIs. olive oil 

1 medium zucchini, sliced 

2 medlum-stze yellow squash, sliced 
2 tomatoes, peeled and quartered 
1/4 tsp. salt 
1/8 tsp. pepper 
1/8 tsp. dried oregano (whole) 
1/8 tsp. dried thyme (whole) 
1/4 tsp. hot sauce 
Saute onion and garlic in olive oil in a skillet until 

crisp-tender. Add zucchini and yellow squash; cook 
vegetable mbtture over medium-high heat, stirring • 
constantly, for 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and remaining 
ingredients; cook, stirring constantly for 2 minutes. 
Serve immediately. Serves 6. 

Cold zucchini soup 

Delicious, smooth and cool. Serve as a first course or 
at lunch with a salad or sandwich. 

2 lbs. zucchini 

3 cups chicken broth 

1 tsp. dried majoram 

2 Ibis, butter 
2 Ibis, flour 
2 cups milk 
salt 

freshly ground pepper 
1 cup heavy cream 
chopped parsley for garnish 

Trim, wash and slice the zucchini. Put in a saucepan 
with the chicken stock and marjoram. Cook until 
tender, about 20 minutes. Puree through a food mill or 
food processor. Melt butter and add the flour all at 
once, stirring to make a smooth, creamy texture. Cook, 
stirring, for about 2 to 3 minutes and remove from the 
heat. Cool slightly. Heat the milk until it just comes to a 
boil. Add the milk to the cooled roux. Return to the heal 
and cook, stirring, for 15 minutes or until the floury 
taste is gone. Add the pureed zucchini and season with 
salt and pepper to taste. Cliill thoroughly. Stir cream 



into the chilled soup. Correct the seasoning, if 
necessary. Serve garnished with chopped parsley. 
Makes 6 to 8 servings. 





Zucchini caviar 

An outstanding, light appetizer reminiscent of 
classic eggplant caviar, served with pita bread triangles 
or French bread slices. 

2 Tbls. olive oil 

2 cups shredded, unpeeled zucchini 

1/2 cup diced sweet red pepper 

1/2 cup diced onion 

1 clove garlic, minced 

1 tsp. celery seeds 
1/2 tsp. dried whole basil 
1/2 tsp. dried whole oregano 

2 Tbls. minced fresh parsley 
2 cups diced tomato 
1 tsp. grated lemon rind 

1 1/2 tsp. Worchestershire sauce 
1/4 tsp. salt 

1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper 

2 Tbls. lemon juice 

pita bread triangles or French bread slices 
Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat 
until hot. Add next 8 ingredients; saute untU vegetables 
are crisp-tender. Remove from heat; stir in diced 
tomatoes and next 4 ingredients. Chill several hours. 
Add lemon juice; toss gently and chill thoroughly. Serve 
with pita bread triangles or French bread slices. Makes 
4 cups (6 calories per tablespoon). 




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(fMeadowdak 

country estates 



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Meadowdale Farms Country Estates 

Southeastern Wsconsin's premier subdivision. Creating 
country living rich in tradition, timeless in appeal. 

Zoned residential - no multi-use sites. Conveniently located 
in the Village of Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin within 5 
minutes from 1-94; 45 minutes from O'Hare Airport; minutes 
from the Metra system serving greater Chicago; 45 minutes 
from downtown Milwaukee. Close to schools, churches and 
shopping. 

Excellent selection of estate sites still available. Choose from 
3/4 to 1-1/4 acre parcels. Lots start from $65,000 and 
include the cost of city water, sewer, storm sewer and 
paving improvements to site. 

For more information call: 

PATRICIA G. NELSON, Broker 
1-414-694-5761 

A property of Isetts' Meadowdale Farms, Inc. 




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Friday, August! 6, 1991 



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The natural gas grill 
provides dependable 
outdoor cooking with a 
convenient fuel supply. 
The American Gas Assn. 
recommends these energy 
saving tips when using a 
gas grill: 

• Limit preheating time. 

• Use only one burner on 
dual-burner grills unless 
both burners are needed, 

• Use the lowest flame 
setting possible. 

• Cook with the grill cover 
closed for more smoke 
flavor and shorter cooking 
times. 

• Prepare slow cooking 
foods on the grill to keep 
heat out of the kitchen 
and to save on air condi- 
tioning. 

• Cook several foods or 



entire meals at one time 
on the grill. 

• Cook a full grill of steaks 
or burgers. 

• Thaw frozen foods be- 
fore grilling unless other- 
wise directed. . 

• Use a thermometer or 
timer to eliminate over- 
cooking and guesswork. 

• Keep ."burn-off cleaning 
time to a minimum. 

• Keep grill clean and 
properly maintained. 



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padding & 

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All Remaining 
Patio Furniture 



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BROILMASTER 

BY WARM MORNING 



OFF 

To Make Room 

For New Fall Line 

of Wicker & 

Rattan by 

Typhoon 



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Stop in and see our large! 

selection of casual 

furniture featuring 

•Halcyon 

•Telescope 

Casual and 

•Typhoon 

CUSTOM 

ORDERS 

WELCOME 



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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK: 
Mon.-Frl 9-8 • Sun, 11-5 



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|U5t 16, 1991 



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^m5}455-0mi 



rRV<^TAi 1 Akf/II fffl2 (CpNVENIENTU^ 



FREE 
ESTIMATES 



Pictures for illustration only. 
Styles vary. 




Frlday.August16, 1991 



lakeland Nowspapers 33 



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Kolbe & Kolbe Aluminum 




Windows 




Slideby Unit 









We build clad windows for 
people who'd ratiier see 
snowcovered fir trees than 
frosty window panes and 
big fuel bills. 

We begin with nature's 
finest insulator - wood, and 
cover It with heavy-guage, 
roll-formed aluminum. 
Unlike the hollow aluminum 
extrusions on most clad 
windows, our overlapped 
and sealed sheathing hugs 
the contours of the wood to 
form an impenetrable 
moisture barrier. 



Our solid wood, 
prefinished sash with one 
half inch insulating glass 
are tightly sealed by 
compressible foam-backed 
jamb liners and thermo- 
plastic bulb weatherstrip- 
ping. The result: a strong, 
insulated, weathertlght 
window. 

With a baked-on finish 
that won't crack, blister or 
peel, a Kolbe & Kolbe clad 
window is as maintenance 
free as it Is beautiful. 



Come and see. 




I Kolbe & Kolbe 

^ MillworkCcInc. 



Beautify Your Home with Wood Windows. 




237 Main St. - Twin Lakes, Wl 53181 - (414) 877-2181 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 7:00-5:00 & Sat. 8:00-4:00 
"Where Service and Quality Come First" 

ELKHORN LOCATION 
99 E. Centrallla - Elkhorn, Wl - (414) 723-3230 

HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 7:00-5:00 & Sat. 8:00-Noon 

HARVARD LOCATION 
360 S. Division - Harvard, IL 60033 - (815) 943-4440 

HOURS: IVIon.-Fri. 7:00-5:00 & Sat. 8:00-4:00 



STAN TORSTENSON 



PRESIDENT 




:%>.if\iiii-xir*K 



1 Home^ 






Houseplants cure 'sick' office 



While efforts to "clean 
up the air" a generation 
ago focused on car ex- 
haust, factories, and In- 
dustrial plants polluting 
the outdoors, today's 
concerns are shifting to 
indoor pollution. Syn- 
thetic building materials 
and furnishings can re- 
lease chemicals into the 
indoors. Making sure that 



our buildings don't leak 
air in order to save energy 
means that the same air 
can sit within a building 
for a long time. These fac- 
tors considered together 
contribute to a phe- 
nomenon called "sick 
building syndrome," 
whose symptoms include 
head -aches, nausea, eye 
irritation, breathing 




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^ On Rt. 14 (Norlhwest Hwy.) iiisl West ol tlie 
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fiWfCT^ OpBnlVlon-Fri 9-9 > Sat 9-5 * Svn'1 0:30-5 % 



difficulties, and raslies. 

Arctiitccts and engi- 
neers are rapidly incor- 
porating building strate- 
gies that can reduce in- 
door pollution potentials. 
These strategies range 
from mechanical systems 
that more quickly replace 
fresh air to specifying 
nonpoUutlng paints and 
carpet adhesives. It ap- 
pears that these profes- 
sionals may be able to get 
some additional assis- 
tance from a little green 
friend, the common 
houseplant. 

As a case in point, The 
National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 
(NASA) long has used 
plants to help remove 
formaldehyde and other 
pollutants in space cap- 
sules. The plants remove . 
the pollutants mostly 
through their root sys- 
tems, but also employ a 
filter system of tiny holes 
in their leaves. 

In the study, Dr. 
Wolverton repeatedly 
placed ordinary potted 
house plants Into sealed 
plexiglass chambers. He 
then injected large 
amounts of one of the 
three of the most com- 
mon pollutants found in 
indoor air — benzene, 
formaldehyde, or 
trichloroethylcne (TCE)— 
Into the air inside each 
chamber. (These rather 
exotic-sounding pollu- 
tants are released from a 
number of materials 
commonly found in the 
office and in the home, 
including household 
cleaners, water repellents, 
adhesives for floors and 
carpets, paints, plastics, 
and dry cleaning chemi- 
cals.) Wolverton then 
measured air samples 
from each chamber some 
24 hours later. The plants 
had removed significant 
amounts of the pollutants; 
some had cleared 90 per- 
cent of a particular pollu- 
tzint from the chamber air. 

Just a handful of the 
most popular types of 
houseplants have been 
tested of course, but some 
species seem extremely 
adept at removing specific 
types of pollutants, En- 
glish ivy absorbs benzene 
efficiently; aloe vera and 
spider plants specialize in 
formaldehyde removal; 
and potted chrysanthe- 
mums and peace lUics 
top the list for 
tricliloroethylene re- 
moval. Gcrbera ("African") 
daisies and aloe vera work 
well as all-purpose ab- 
sorbers. 




LAKELAND NEWSPAPER'S 
CLASSIFIEDS 

(70B)223.B161 









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Friday, August 16, 1991 



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Items 
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other 
cap- 
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sealed 
rs. He 

the 
:om- 
und in 
;ne, 

CTCE)— 
each 

rather 

poUu- 
from a 

lals 
in the 

home, 

lold 

3pcllents, 

3rs and 

ilastics, 

; chemi- 

thcn 

nples 

ber some 

he plants 

jnificant 
pollutants; 

d 90 per- 
lar pollu- 

amber air. 
J of the 
pes of 
/e been 
, but some 
itremely 
LHg specific 
nts. Gn- 
s benzene 

vera and 
3ccialize In 
removal; 
ysanthe- 
ce lilies 

tie re- 

L ("African") 
e vera work 
)0se ab- 




EWSPAPER'S 
IFIEOS 

3-8161 



ugust 16. 1991 



I,' 




NOTICES 



■•S- 



Obituaries 



i;.^ 



Edward J. Stevens ' . 

Edward J. "Ed" "Scooicr" Stevens, 16, died August 
1, 1991, as the result of an automobile accident. 

Edward was born in Phoenix, Arizona, May 28, 
1975, to Edward and Candicc Kyle Stevens. He moved 
from Phoenbt in 1979 with his family to Walnut, Iowa 
and resided there until 1989. Most reccndy he moved to 
Round Lake Beach for the past two years. 

He is survived by his mother, Candicc (Tim) 
Squires, of Round Lake Beach; father, Edward' (Dawn) 
Stevens, of Walnut, Iowa; two sisters, Chcny Lara and 
Cheryl Lara of Auduban. Iowa; maternal grandparents, 
Williatn and LaVcmA Squires of Cumberland, Iowa; 
paternal grandparents, Gerald and Gladys Stevens of 
Walnut, Iowa and dear aunt. Captain Gina Heart, of 
U.S. Army, Great Lakes, HI. • 

Visitation was'Sunday, August 4, 1991 from 4 to 
9 p.m. at the JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL 
HOME, 222 North Rosedalc Court (Rosedale Court at 
Cedar Lake Road) Round Lake. Funeral service was 
held Monday, at 11 a.m. at die funeral home with Rev, 
Marvin Howard of the Clcarview Baptist Church. 
Round Lake Beach. Intemicnt was Wednesday at 10' 
a.m. in the Lay ton Township Cemetery, Walnut, Iowa. 
Memorials would be greatly appreciated to the family 
in Edward's name. 

James H. Patterson 

• James H. "Pat" Patterson, 69, of Grayslakc, 111. 
passed away Wednesday, Aug. 7, 1991, at Sherman 
Hospital, Elgin, 111. following a brief iUncss. 

He was bom in Beaumont, Miss. Dec. 22, 1921, 
and has made his home in Grayslake the past 36 years. 
He was aveteran of WWH serving with the U.S. Air 
Force; member and past commander of American Le- 
gion Post #659, Grayslake; member and past 
commander of V.F.W. Ronald Hill Memorial Post, 
Grayslakc; Loyal Order of Cooties; Grayslake Ex- 
change Club; Grayslake Lions Club; and the CampOrc 
Girls and Boys Clubs. He was a carpenter by frade for 
over 30 years. 

He leaves his wife, Ruth, ncc Leder; three daugh- 
ters, Helen Timan, Round Lake, HI.; Emma Patterson, 
Brooklyn, N.Y.; and Toni (MalUiew) Shinncrs, 
Grayslakc; six grandchildren; duec great grandchildren; 
three sisters, Ruth Clark, Margaret Patterson, and Sis 
Tingle; one brother, Ray Patterson; all of Beaumont, 
Miss. 

Memorial services will be offered at 11 a.m. 
Saturday, Aug. 10, 1991, at Strang Funeral Chapel, 
410 E. Belviderc Road, Grayslake, with V.F.W. Chap- 
lain officiating. Interment will be private. Friends of 
the family may call at the chapel one hour before ser- 
vices, 

Aaron Lee Chlopek 

Aaron Lee Chlopek, 8, of Round Lake, Illinois, 
died August 8, 1991. 

He was bom in Waukegan, Illinois, May 30, 1983 
and had been a resident of the Round Lake area until 
1988 when the family moved to Chicago for three 
years moving back to Round Lake in 1991. He had 
been a student at Daniel Boone School in Chicago. 

Beloved son of Gail Collins, of Round Lake; An- 
Uiony (Sandy) Chlopek, of Island Lake, Illinois; dear 
brother of Kereana Chlopek, of Island Lake; Christina 
Chlopek, of Island Lake; and Michael (Cindy) Mellcn, 
of Baicsville, Mississippi; loving step-brother of Tracy 
Wenncrbcrg, of Mundclein; and Scott Wenncrbcrg, of 
Island Lake; dear paternal grandson of Martin (Lillian) 
Chlopek, of Round Lake Beach; maternal grandson of 
Raymond (Peggy) Panzer, of Baicsville, Mississippi; 
fond cousin of Natasha Anderson, of Waukegan; and 
loving nephew of many aunts and uncles. 

Visitation will be Monday from 4 to 9 p.m. at 
THE JUSTEN'S ROUND LAKE FUNERAL HOME, 
222 NorUi Rosedale Court, (Rosedale Court at Cedar 
Lake Road). Funeral services will be Tuesday at 1 1 
a.m. at the funeral home with Fr. Al Levcridgc, Vicar, 
Church of the Holy Apostles, Wauconda officiating. 
Interment will be at Warren Cemetery, Gumcc, Illi- 
nois. Memorials may be made to Children's Memorial 
Heart Fund or to die Round Lake Rescue Squad, Round 
Lake, Illinois. 



i\ 



f 



Nmicti TO advbrhsers 

Please be advised that as of our August 16, 
1991 edition, the deadline to place a classified 
ad (business or private party) In the 14 lake 
County newspapers will be 

10:00 A.9I. Wednesdays. 

Should you have any questions, please 
contact your Classified Account Representative 
at (708)223-8161. Thanl^ you. 



(708) 223-81 61 



Obituaries 



BRYDON 

William Brydon» 63 of 
Mundelein. Arr: The 
Kristan Funeral Home, 
Mundelein, 

DALY 

James M. Daly, 65 of 
Orraand Beach, FLA, 
formerly of Lake 
Zurich, Air. AMgrim & 
Sons Funeral Home, 
Lake Zurich. 



DIEDRICH 

Elizabeth Dicdrich, 96 
of Yolo. Arr: Peter M. 
Justcn & Son Funeral 
Home, McHeniy. 



GIBSON 

Herbert W. Gibson, 67 
of Gages Lake. Arr: 
Private. 

GUIDO 

Joseph V. Guido, 63 of 
Lake Villa. Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral. 
Home, Libertyvillc. 

HANKE 

Leslie A. Hanke, 80 of 
Antioch. Arr: Strang 
Funeral Home, Antioch. 

HANSEN 

Paul M. Hansen, 33 of 
Libertyvillc. Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libcrlyville. 



KAVE 

Lorraine J. Kave, 71 of 
Round Lake Beach. Arr: 
Strang Funeral Chapel, 
, Grayslake. 

LEMPINEN 

■ Unto Lempinen, 78 of 
Gumee. Arr: The Gur- 
nec Funeral Home, Gur- 
nec. 

METLER 

Margaret F. Metier, 70 
of Algonquin. Arr: 
Ahlgrim & SonS 
Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich. 

PAULY . 

Susan L. Pauly, 38 of 
Spring Grove. Air: K.K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, 
Fox Lake. 

SWAN . 

Margaret A. Swan, nee 
Joyce, 43 of Fox Lake. 
Arr: K.K. Hamsher 
. Funeral Home, Fox 
Lake. 

TALCOTT 

Louis H. Talcolt, 73 of 
Gages Lake. Arr: Surang 
Funeral Chapel, 

Grayslake. 

TIEMANN, SR. 

Edward W. Tiemann, 
Sr., 75 of Gumee. Arr: 
Marsh Funeral Home of 
Gumee. 




NoticcB 




Notices 




MAKE A FRIEND...FOR 

LIFEI Scandinavian, 
European, Yugoslavian, 
Australian High School 
Exchange Students. 
Arriving August. HOST 
FAMILIES NEEDEDII 
American Intercultural 
Student Exchange. Call Toll 
Free (800)S1BLING. 
11-00^ 



SHARE AMERICA!] 
Wall's Must Falll Visa 
deadlines Herel AISE High 
School Exchange Students 
await family call for August. 
31 countries/local 
rapresentive. Just food, 
bed, sharlngi ExcitingI 
RewardingI RelevantI 
Lifellmet'l-(800)SIBL[NG. 
11-00-2 



IjtitiiiiiiiiiinitniiitiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiititiuiiiiiHiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiintg 
B The Deadline for Obituaries & Death Notices § 

M Is 5 p.m on Tuesday. j 



c/o<eLnau t^tA^^ef<allona/lel:, JjSdC. 




£i^(' '--"•" 



FoViTth O^neration Family ojfertng 
sincerity sensitivity fit coji\fort In your 
time of need. 

We work with your best interest in 
mind to help case your burden. 

We encourage you to learn more about 
your options. It's never too early* 
Inqutrtes are always welcome. 



•Pre an-angemenU 

■Vetenni & Social 
Securitf D«neQt« 
•Air Shipping Service 
•Tax Free Tniit 



•Medical Science 
•Public Aid 
•Direct CremsttoD 
•Pore Thought 
Iniitrance PUn 
•Pajrtncnt PUnc 



TcTSOiu^ caring for over 90 years 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Grayslake 

223-8122 




Notices 




URGENTII FINLAND'S 

Janne anxiously awaits Hc^t 
Family Call to A.I.S.E. 
Illinois. Sv/Imming, drawing, 
skateboarding, "ambitjous'. 
TIME Running OUT for 
Janne and othersi Barbara 
FVIadsen. (217)243-8453, 
(800)SIBUNG. 

11-00-1 



LOOKING FOR 

HOSTESSES for 

Christmas Around the 
World shows. f^Inimum $50 
free merchandise. Over 70 
pages of holiday 
decorations and gifts. Call 
Vtcki for details. (708)473- 
9910. 

1-34-11/G 



SINGERS NEEDED 

Coniomporary Christian 
Choir Toll the World," needs 
good voices, ages 14-33. No 
pay, but lots of satisraclion. 
Call for details. 
Atkfor Walt or Minam 
[708] B26-8306 




. IBHILIL 





EVERYTHING 
SELLS FOR 



$1 



Toys • Books • Gifts 

Accessories * Clothing 

Jewelry- Housewares 

Novelties •Cosmetics 

Food • Pet Food 

Health & Beauty 





The Big 

One! 

Happy 

100th 

Grandma 

Furlan 

(FarmCiraiidraa) 

With love from 

oil your chlldrea 

and 

gfandchlldreii 

Angnst 17f ^ 

1991 



Lost & 
Found 




OPENING 
SOONI 

752-754 East Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake Beach 



LOST OUR DOGll 
HELP us find our Fawn 
colored Boxer. 10 yrs. old, 
no tags. Vacinily of 
Beechwood and Midland 
in Round Lake on Sunday 
8-4. CALL WITH ANY 
INFORMATION!! * 
(708)740-0385. Timid but 
Friendly. HELPIII 
2-31 -to 



Free 



f- 1 




TEDDY BEAR 
HAMSTERS- 8 weeks 
old, FREE to good 
fiome. Call (414)857-7766. 
Between 6p.m. and 8p.m. 
47-TF-1/K/G 
3-TF/K/G 
THE WINNING TEAM 

— ^^r>wo me 

/OASsiFieos 

SETVOU 




WHBR£YOiJ 
WANT TO GO 



■ Griefnotes — 

People In early grief often are shocked and 
lanable to believe what has happened. They 
may feel angry or guilty and have difficulty 
organizing their life, sleeping or eating habits. 
If you wish to help you should encourage 
expressions of feelings. This means listening 
to the grieving as they talk about the death 
and their pain over it. You can also provide * 
practical assistance such as babysitting, 
organizing the household and driving your 
friend to appointments. Attending the funeral 

How can I help a 
grieving friend? 

or visitation gives you an opportunity to 
express your feelings and to give needed 
support. If you can't go to the funeral or 
visitation contact your friend and express 
your feelings as soon as possible after the 



death. 



.12 N. Pistakee Lake Road • Fox Lake, IL 
Phone: (708) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 




Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakoland Nowspapors 35 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



1 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



i^ 



(708)223-8161 



-=-uaa- — ^ TT ' '" 



: - 1 vj iv 



\ 

I 









1'^ 



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TO THE MOTHER OF 
OUR BABY: Please be 
the silver lining in our dark 
cloudl We can't be parents 
without you, Mom. We 
long to bandage boo-boos 
and brush away the tears. 
We long to rock our baby 
gently through the years, 
NOTHING would make us 
more proud than for you to 
be that silver lining In our 
cloud. Expenses Paid, 
Confidential. (708)438- 
5633 Collect, Kathleen 
and Tony. 

4-34-1 60/G32/K6 

DEVOTED COUPLE 

HAS UNLIMITED love to 
give your child. Full-time 
mom and adoring dad offer 
bright future, financial 
security, happy home in 
family neighborhood. 
Anxiously awaiting baby to 
(ill our life. Medical/legal 
paid. Confidential. Call us 
at (312)763-1240. 
4-35-7/G2 
ADOPTION-A LOVING 
ALTERNATIVE. My 
husband and 1 love 
children. We are a 
professional couple that 
offers your baby a loving 
home, extended family, 
college education, and a 
wonderful future. We are 
licensed foster parents 
wanting to be permanant 
adoptive parents. 
Medical/Legal paid. Call 
Lucy and John collacL 
(708)965-8763. 

4-35-8/G3/K7 
ADOPTION- LET US 
HELP EACH OTHER. 
Let us give your unborn 
child a bright future. We 
can provide unconditional 
love and a happy secure 
home. Legal, Mediical 
Paid. Call collect (81 5)874- 
5164. Gene and Ruth. 
4-35-1 59/G31/K5 



HAPPILY MARRIED 
CHILDLESS COUPLE - 

Seeks to adopt infant to love 
and to cherish for the rest of 
our lives. Financially secure 
business owners will raise 
your child in a rural 
community and will teach 
him or her the values of life 
and family. Please let us 
help you in your time of 
need and also make our 
dreams, come true. All 
medical and legal expenses 
paid. Please contact our 
lawyer at (70B}546-0055. C. 
Williamson. 

4-TF-29 

WE'RE PRAYING FOR 
A BABY to love and raise. 
Woni you let us help you 
and also make our own 
dreams come true? We're a 
happily married couple who 
offer endless love and care 
with Mom staying homo. 
Medical/legal paid. Please 
call Linda collect (708)623- 
0984. 

4-32/35-158 

Personals 

IS YOUR GROUP OR 

ORGANIZATION. 
Looking for a Fund 
Raiser? Several brochures 
to chose from, 40 to 50% 
profit guaranteed. Call Vtcki 
(708)473-9910. 

6-36-1 0/G 



Financial 





ATTENTION 
VETERANS! Home 
loans to purchase or 
refinance. 100% 
purchases/gO% 
refinances up to 
$144,000,00 Phone 
Clarence Phillips 
Mortgage Co. 1(615)684- 
1029. 

7-00-24 




HelpWanied 
Parl-Tlme 



ffi 



HelpWanled 
Pan-Time 




YARD BOY- For help 

on private estate. You 
must be hardworking, 
dependable, and have 
own transportation, and be 
over 16. Call (708)356- 
8209 for inten/iew. 
19-33-81 



ASSEMBLY DEPARTMENT 

•6:45 am- 11:30 am 

• Tuesday - Friday 

•19hrs/wk, $6.24/hr 

AppI/ in Person 

REGAL CHINA 

306 N. Ave., Antioch, IL • 






DOLLAR VIDEO 

•Full or Part Time 
• Ideal for housewife (with 
children in school) or 
Jr. College students 
Call Geary or Craig 
(708)395-0212 



PART TIME 
POSITIONS 
Gurnee Mills 

Remington 
Factory Outlet 

Retail and service 
experience in 
sliavers. Salary 
plus commission 
Call 

(708) 855-0075 

Ask for James Locke 



DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 

With excellent people 
skills, for people-oriented 
general practice. If you 
wish to join our outgoing, 
caring team, please give 
us a call: 

(708) 872-5626 

|^/1on,Tues(19tfi, 20th) 

after 2:00 pm 

Experience desirable but not 

necessary 



r 



HelpWanted^ 
Part-Tinie 




STACK WOOD 

Need part-time help to sladt 

wood in Wauconda area Call: 

Grass Roots Energy 

BUI Brown 

(708) 526-5888 



AVON SAVES 

Up to 50% commission. No 

door to door. $1 Investment 

Call Margaret Anytime 

(600) 339-2866 

(708)991-2866 



EXaxiNG 

OPPORTUNITY IN 

HEALTH & BEAUTY 

Nalionaliy-known company 

socking people to bo iheir own 

boss and make groal money 

markoling Nalural Hoallh 

and Boauly products 

•Ouistanding Incoma opportunity 

•Plus bonus car 

Schlelelbein Enlerprisos 

(70B) 4384009 



Regency Brm 

Antioch, IL 

Now hiring in 

Housekeeping Dept. 

• Company Benefits 

• Apply in Person 
Hwy.173&Bt.83 

in Antioch 



THE WINNING TEAM 

*^^*^ANO THE 
OASSIFIEOS 
'GET YOU 
WHEn£ YOU 
'WANT TO GO 




IVEWC09IPAIVY 

Looking for respon- 
sible, energetic, 
conscientious people 
seeking opportunity 
and advancement in 
tfie restaurant industry. 

No Experience 
Necessary 

Flexible Hours- 
Daytime or Evening 

• Cashiers 

• Hostess/Host 

• Kitcfien Help 
Call (708) 438-1811 






INSIDE SALES 
Part Time 

GLIDDEN, Tfie hottest 
name in paints and 
wallcoverings has an 
excellent opportunity for a 
person to handle inside 
sales and warehouse 
work. Warehouse and/or 
paint experience would be 
helplul. 

We offer excellent 
training, competitive salary 
and a congenial working 
environment. 

APPLY IN PERSON 

OI^IDDBNT 

Paints & Wallcoverings 

3590 Grand Ave. 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

Equal Opgly, EfTployer M/F 



IRS I 




In Tho Lakeland 
Classiliods! 



t 



FR£EIil]!«rC£ REPORTERS 

Lalceland Newspapers has openings 

for freelance reporters to cover 

village board meetings. Especially 

needed are reporters to cover the 

Vernon Hills Village Board and the 

North Chicago Village Board, Call 

Claudia Lenart 

Managing Editor 

(708) 323-8161 jj 



HelpWanled 
Pan-Time 




HelpWanled, 
Pan-Time 






INSURANCE INSPECTOR 

ideal parl-tlmo work in local area 
(or an aclivo rellree. Writs: 
ISB 

P.O. Box 464 

Chicago, IL 60690 

Need Car & Camera 



Part-time evenings plus some 

weekends. Amoco Food Shop 

Rta12&QuentinRd„ 

UksZitridi 

438-6650 



Child Care 

Mature, responsible person to 

work al our after school child 

program. 

• 2:30 - 6'.00 pm 

• Monday - Friday 
Please Contact Kris 

Wauconda Park District 
C708> 526-36IO 



GREAT SECOND 
INCOME 

Newspaper routes, 3 a.m. - 
7 a.m.. Home delivery, 
bundle or weekends only 
available. 

Mundelein/LlbertyvillQ area. 

Must carry auto Insurance. 

Call before 12:00 noon. 

(70B) 949-8630 

(70S) 949-6830 






MEN/WOMEN 

Summer funds, available 
to both men and women 
for selling Avon, the 
popular product that 
almost sells Itself. Besides 
earning extra money, you 
will have the opportunity 
of buying gift items for 
men, women or children 
at discount prices plus 
the best smelling mosqui- 
to repellent available. 
Call: 

(708) 566-0990 



"HelpWanled 
Full-Tlme 

DRIVERS- 1 yr OTR 

experience. Run midwest, 
south, southeast. 
Assigned tractor. Mileage, 
safty, fuel bonuses. Home 
regular. HEARTLAND 
EXPRESSING. (800)441- 
4953 

20-00-97 
HELP WANTED- 

Experienced Apartment 
Manager to live on 
premises In Zion, 
References required. 
(815)385-9067. (owner). 

20-33/TF-27 
TRUCK DRIVERS. 
American President 
Trucking, in -ho use carrier 
for a $2 billion company, 
pays .25 cents/mile, 
loaded or empty and up to 
.28 cents after 3 yre.Pliis 
monthly bonuses up to 
.03 cents/mile. We have a 
built-in demand for drivers 
like you. If you're 25 with 3 
yrs OTR experience Call 
(800)88-2781. Dept, T-93 
TODAY! 

20 -00-92 _ 



2 



HelpWanled^ 
Full-Time 

TRUCK DRIVERS Be 

home Most nights and 
weekends. Triple Crown 
Services with 

northAmerican Van Lines 
(both subsidiaries of 
Norfolk Souther^) is 
offering drayage hauling 
contracts to experienced 
owner/operators within 
150 miles of Chicago 
temiinal. We offer mileage 
based compensation, time 
home thru week and 
weekends, lease 
purchase plans, drop and 
hook compensation. You 
must be at least.23 vnlh 6 
months to 1 yr. 
tractor/trailer experience, 
have a good driving 
record, pass DOT physical 
and substance abuse test 
(800)348-2191 ask for 
Department R1 37. 
20-00-98 



Lakeland Ciassified 

(800)442-8161 



ei:.^ssMf'ME:» gui»e: 



Twtrf 
Lakes* 



Conuty 

'Stiver La)t« , , 

•Bristol 



Richmond 



Grove 



JohnstHjr^ 



McHenry 



Crystal 
Lake 

Mcllenry 



-AxitlOCJl (^ 



•Lftk« <Uixl£nlu;r&i 
J/nia 



•Kenosha 



•Fox lake 

® 



•Round 
Lak* 



Gray^^ke 



•Miilbtirn 

^' — \ 
vJ^Wadworth 

Hjkimw Waukeqan 



t>afac Comity \g»y ^^ 



ui...«„rf^. 'Wundelcln . Oaks 

BontnBton .Lake Zurlcli V^^ Hdl* ,„l»c \ 

.jQiiei' 'li^oto^^-m l^ke Forest 






8«rrlngton 



•Long 
Grove 



Buffalo Grove 



•Palatine 

Cook Coiuily 




tllghland Park 
■Deerlleld 



•Northbrook 



AlVIVOUlN'CEMElNTS 

Notices 1 

Lost & Found 2 

Free 3 

Pefsonals 4 

Auctions 5 

Business Personals 6 

Financial 7 

EltlPLOYI^IEIVr 

Help Wanted Part-Time 19 

Hei) Wanted Full-Time 20 

ETpIoyment Agencies 21 

Business Opporlunilies 22 

Woik Wanted 23 

Child Oa«t 24 

School/lnstrudbn 25 



ItlARKIT GUIDE 




Antiques 


30 


Appliances 


31 


Barter/Trade 


32 


Bazaar s/Cratls 


33 


Building Maiotlals 


34 


Businoss/Olftco Equipment 


35 


Eiodtonlcs/Conputors 


36 


Farm Guide 


37 


Rrewood 


38 


Garage/Rummage Sales 


40 



niAKKET GUIDE 




Good Things to Eat 


41 


Horses & Tack 


42 


Household Goods/Furnilure 


43 


Lawn/Garden 


44 


Miscellaneous 


45 


Musical Instruments 


46 


Pets & Supplies 


47 


Tods & Machinery 


48 


Wanted To Buy 


49 


RE/VL ESTATE 




Homes For Sale 


50 


Homes For Rent 


SI 


Homes Wanted 


52 


Homes Builders 


53 


CondoTcwn Homes 


54 


Mobile Homes 


55 


Apanmenis For Rent 


56 


Apattmenis Wanted 


57 


Apt JHomes To Share 


58 


Rooms For Rent 


59 


Business Property For Sale 


60 


Business (Property For Rent 


61 


Buildings 


52 


Lols/Acieage/Faims 


63 


Resorts/Vacallon Rentals 


64 


Oul ol Area Property 


65 



REAL ESTATE 

Cemelery Lots 66 

Real Estate Wanted 67 

Real Estate Misa 68 

RECREATIOIVAIi 

Recreallonal Vehicles 70 

Snowmobiles/ATVs 71 

Boats/Motors^tc. 72 

Camping 73 

TtavelA/acation 74 

Sports Equipment 75 

Aiiptanes 76 

TRANSPORTATION 

Cars For Sate 60 

Renlain.ease 81 

Service & Parts 83 

Car Loans/Insurance 84 

Vans 65 

TruAs/Trallers 86 

Heavy Equipment 87 

Motorcycles 8B 

Wanted To Buy 69 

SERVICE DIRECTORY 

Appliance Repair SI 

Blacktop S3 

Builders S5 



SER\TCE DIRECTORY' 



Carpentry 

Carpet Cleaning 

Concrele^Cement 

Dry Wall 

Educalion/lnstruclion 

Electrical 

Handyman 

Hoalln&'AirCondtlksning 

Landscaping 

laundryADIeanlng 

Legal Services 

Moving/Storage 

Painting^ecoratlng 

ParaLegal/ryping Servfces 

Piuntiing 

Pools 

Pfolessksnal Services 

Radio/TV Repair 

Remodeling 

Resumes 

Rooling/Skllng 

Storage 

Tax Son/ico 

Trees/Plants 

Wedding 

Miscellaneous 



S7 
S6 
S9 
S10 
S11 
St3 
S14 
S15 
S17 

sig 

S21 
S23 
S25 
S2G 
S27 
S29 
S3t 
S33 
S35 
S37 
S39 
S41 
S43 
S45 
S47 
S49 



Lakeland's Ciassified Ads appear in ali 14 newspapers witti a 

Readersirip of over 200,000 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

PIsase chedt your ad on tho FIRST insertion dado. In tho event o( an errof or ornluilon, we Mill Im rosponeble lor ONLY (he FIRST Incorrod 
Insertion. Tho newspaper will bo rocponsit>l(i lor only tho ponlon of the ad Ihal is In error. Pioase notify the ClafisDIad DopartmenI In thg evont of an 
orror within 1 wookolrundalo. CANfCELLATIONSmu&l t>o made prior to 5 p.nn. oh the Tuesday beforo publicallon. 

Lakeland Nowepapors fmorvtm tho right to property classify all advatllBlng. edk or delete any objectionable wording, or reject any adventsomeni 
lor crodk or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unHled headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accopi help wanted adveriising thai In 
any way violates the Human Rights Act. 



Hours: Monday - Thursday 

8 A.M. - 8 P.M. 

Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. • Nooh 

DEADLINE: 

Wednesdays at 10 A.M. 



(708) 223-8161 

Fax.: (708) 223-8810 
1-800-442-8161 




MasttrCord 



Payment in advance is required 

FOR T>^ESE ads: 

• Advonisere oul ot Lakeland circulation area 

• Business Opponunltles • Mobile Homes 

• SHuallona Waniod • Debt Dlsdolmom 

• Garago and MovHng Sales* 

♦Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

ftfo pots will bo conskSorod tor givoaway. 



■> 



^ '■ 



H 

I 



I 



'A 



'.it 



B. 



i 









34 Lakeland Nowipap«r« 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



jfciaweeiSJsasii^vZ!^^ 




9 

RS Be 

his and 
i Crown 

with 
an Lines 
Ties of 
arji) is 
I hauling 
erienced 
; wilfiin 
Chicago 
r mileage 
ition, time 
iek and 

lease 
drop and' 
tion. You 
23 with 6 

1 yr. 

iperlence, 
I driving 
T physical 
ibuse test 
ask for 
37. 
)8 



assified 
8161 



[E 



[RECTORY' 

S7 

sa 

S9 
S10 
S11 
S13 
S14 
S15 
S17 

sie 

S21 
S23 
S2S 

sas 

S27 

S29 

S31' 

S33 

S35 

S37 

S39 

S41 

S43 

S45 

S47 

S49 



Ion 



lioning 



ng 

I Sen/ices 



irices 



1th a 



-IRST Incorroa 
the ovant ot an 

f advanisoowni 

Jvotllsing that In 



e IS REQUIRED 

ads: 

id clrculallon area 
• Mobito Homos 
ofatDlsdolrnera 
ngSalOT* 
Ada mo FREE. 
id for gtvoaway. 






% 



.f.'- 



\ 



% 




llelpWanled 
FulUTime 



9 




llelpWaiitr.d__| 
Full-Timc 

TRUCK DRIVERS- 
Great pa/ and benefitsll 
Talk to a company that puts 
its money where its mouth 
is. We pay for your OTR 
expenence- up to $;28 per 
mile. - Call J.B. Hunt: 
M(aOO)2JB-HUNT. EOE. 
Subject to drug screen. 
Minimum age 21 years. 

120-00-4 
COVENANT 
TRANSPORT Hiring 
Tractor Trailer Drivers. 1 yr. 
OTR experience. Single 
$.19 -.22 cents East Coast 
Pay. Incentive Pay. Benefits 
Pacl<age. Age 23. Teams 
$.27-.31 cents. 1(800)441- 
4394. 

120-00-7 
NEEDED: 
EXPERIENCED 
Mechanic for Chrysler- 
Plymouth/Jeep -Eagle 
dealership. Full time, 
benefits, Send resume' to 
■Mechanic" P.O.Box 190 
LakeVilla.IL 60046. 
20-32-52 

I LAW ENFOBCElfEIIT 1 
\ JOBS I 

8 $17.542 -$86.682 /Year • 
I Police, Sheriff, State Patrol, 
I Correctional Officers--'' 

2 Cat! 1<{B(35) 962-8000 ' 
Ext. K-22S61 « 



DRIVERS 

Buy a Truck 

Earn up to $2,000 wkly 

Guaranteed Road, City, or, 

dump work No experience? 

Financing 

(708)344-1004 



MANAGER 

TRAINEES 

Nationwide company 

looking for aggressive 

individuals to train in 

management positions. 

No experience 

necessary. 

(708) 623-0020 



CAFETERIA 



Full or Part time 
Monday-Friday. 
Company 
benefits. Apply 
between 8 am- 
1 pm 

or Call 
(708) 578-2865 



llcIpWunlcd 
Full-Timn 



M 



DRIVERS- OTR 

CORE CARRIER 
CORP. of Kansas City 
needs drivers. Offering 
top pay. bonuses, Health 
and Life Ins., good 
equipment, Home often, 
and many other benefits. 
Call (600)621-4402 for 
more details. 

20-00-93 
FRIENDLY HOME 
PARTIES has openings 
for Demonstrators. No cash 
investments. No Service 
charge. Highest 

Commission and Hostess 
Awards. Three catalogs, 
800 Hems, Call 1(800)488- 
4875. 

120-00-8 
HOUSEKEEPER/ 
COMPANION Must live 
In. (708)244-0184. 
20-33-149 



RETAIL 

GURKEE MILLS MALL 
•SALES FULL/PART TIME 

Eidllng DcaJgncr Sloit: Tcaluring 
Bob Mackic, Olcg Casslnl. Dill 
Blass, etc. Btperiancc la preferred 
along with a good knowledge of 
fashion. We offer excellent salary, 
Co. benefits. For Intcvlcv call 
Eileen 

1-800-232-3274 



BBBBBE9BB0BBQBHaEI 

B SCHOOL BUS a 
S DRIVER S 

D 11 

n Valid Illinois license n 
D Required. a 

I Big Hollow | 
g School District » 

g (708) 587-2632 g 

BaBaByBBgyayBBBBi 



MAINTENANCE 

Apartment complex Is 
accepting applications for 
an experienced main- 
tenance person to add to 
our super team. Must 
have knowledge of ele- 
tricity, heating, plumbing, 
and general maintenance. 
The person we are seek- 
ing will be enthusiastic, 
honest, and reliable. A 
rare opportunity for a 
special person. 
Apply in person at: 
American Apartments 
1920WlUlaii]sburg 
WaukegaOf IL 
(708)249-1888 



Teacbebs Nseoed 
FOR Datcar£ Center 

2 years college and some 
experience required. 

C7083 669-3766 
AFTER 6 ISM. 



DAILY 
REPORT 



needed with some 

additional office 

duties. Entry level 

position. Located In 

Vernon Hills. 

Call: 

(708) 367-3600 

Ask for David 



PSYCHIATRIC HEALTHCARE 
MANATEE PALMS 

Molticenl Hotpild hii dymuiic o()ptf%. 
tor piycNtbic h«iJihcirii proltuionili. 
W« olTer (xcd. ul. & b«ni pkg^ ind. but 
tMl jirilsd b cNU ctit, potabto niocif m 
Uft., pfoviaon ol CEUt & rtliMTwil pkg. 
Fb( nw* Info. Ml MirMlM Films HospiliJ 
(l-flOO)M7-7007.EOe 



2 MARINE MECHANICS 

Full service dealer, all 

brands, OMC, Suzuki 

training desired w/refs„ 

KING MARINE ENGINE 

Noraoss (404) 441-7834 

1-80G-336-6129 

FAX 447-^5129 



Vlardeei: 

FALL 
OPENIHGS 

• Asst. Manager 

• Shift Supen/isor 

• Night & Weekend 
Positions 

If you have experience 
or are looking to be a 
learn player, we would 
like you to call: 
Antioch: 
(708) 395-5474 



BLUE JEAN lOBSl 

10 pm-6 am 
Immediate opportunities 
available from now til 
Labor Day. Start today I 
Ideal for college students 
and others. Interviewing 
In Gurnee and River- 
woods. Call now: 
Gumee 708/662-4646 
Rivenwoods 708/459-1320 
RIGHT TEMPOFIARIES 
Over 26 Years of Success 
BOBMIF 



rmms 

FULL AND PART TIME 
TELLERS 

Excellent customer 
service skills and strong 
cash handling experience 
is a must. Prior teller 
experience is preferred 
Qualified applicants please 
apply in person to: 

GR£iTUEESCK£DrrL'ao\ 

SS2SGB£&TBUrR0A0 
50RI1I CHICAGO, HGOOSS 

AU 3ppllcanl3 wil be subject 10 a 
badigrwjnd chodt prfor to omploymanl 
E.O.EJSniotw frM ©nv^ronmonl - 



M^RSHAIX FDB;IJ[>*!S 

poRiKAir jsnjDio 

Hiring Several - Will Train 

• Photo /Sales 

• J^ppt. Secretaries 

• Gift Host / Hostesses 

Sevcrd fiill/part time poeltlons ovallavble for those 
wanting to leara the photography tnieiaefis from the 
ground i^. An Inierest in photo, s^es or telemarketing 
a pluB. Retail & other hre. avallablt. BcncQta for FT 
employees. Apply In person Tues-Frl 11-7:00 at 
Marflholl Field's Portrait Studio, Hawthorn Center 
Oowcr level by Silo) or call 708-680-1400. EOE. 



^ 



ugust 16, 1991 



BANKING / FINANCIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

Are you personable, friendly, detail oriented, 
willing to work Saturdays? With a minimum of 1 
yr. related office or clerical background, you may 
qualify for one of the following positions: 

WAUKEGAN : TELLER (flexible hours) 

NEW ACCOUNTS {full time) 

MUNDELEIN: CLERICAL POSITION (full time) 
TELLER (flexible hours) 

Interviews can be conducted at either office; Monday, 
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 9:00 to 5:00 pm. Call for an 

cooperative credit union 

MAIN - Kevin Mayers, 

2750 W. Washington Street, 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
(708) 623-3636 
BRANCH - Julie Knepper, 

1210 S. Lake Street, 
Mundefein, IL 60060 
{708)566-5810 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 




HcIpW anted 
Full-Timc 




UclpWanlcd, 
Full-Time 



j^ 



POSTAL JOBS 

$11.41/hr.to 
$i4.90/hr. 

For exam and application 
Information, call: 

1(800)552-3995 
Ext. IL 195 

8 a.m.-8 p.m./7 days 



iiSECRElARY/RECEPnONISTi 
' Realty Office 
'• Non smoker 
[• Flexible hours 
!• Typing, phones, 
I general duties 
» Call Nancy Barker 
(708) 223-0826 



[ Weekdays 

I 9anr»-Vpm only 



ASSOCIATE 
DIRECTOR 

Needed for a Britarmica 
Learning Center 

opening in October in 
Vernon Hills. Must be 
dcgrccd and certified 
Elementary teaching 
experience preferred 
Send resume to: 
BLC 

c/o 100 N. School St. 

Mt. Prospect, IL 60056 



OTR TIRE 

Needs tire people 
with experience. Full 
time. Excellent bene- 
fits. Insurance. 

(708) 473-2828 
Ask for 

Steve or Charlie 



WOM€f1'S 

WORKOUT 

WORLD* 



L 



DO YOU ENJOY WORKING 

WITH PEOPLE? 
Womens Workout World In 
Mundeleln is sooklng 

flnihuslastic indivlduats who 
will be trained to teach 
classos and service our 
[Twmbers. Must be physically 
111. Customer Sen/tee 
background a plus. 

Call Sandy at 
(708) 949-6662 



Are You An 
Early Bird 
Who Needs 

Extra Money? 

Come work for ub in our 

quality enviromncnt aa a 

before school club 

counselor 

6:30 am - 8:30 am 

Monday-Friday 

$6.25 / hour 

Child card arrangements 

available. Minimum requirement 

High School Diploma whh 2 years 

experience In a field related to 

school age children. Must be 21 

years or older. 

Apply In Person 
Round Lake Area Park District 
814 Hart Road 
EOE . 



Wacdees; 

FALL OPENINGS 

• Asst. Manager 

■ Shift Supervisor 

• Night & Weekend Positions 

If you have experience or are looking to be 
a team player, we w/ould like you to call us: 
Grayslake (708) 223-6434 

(708) 949-4800 
(708) 872-8900 
(708) 623-0209 
(708) 395-5474 



Mundeleln 
ZIon 

Waukegan 
Antioch 



:^v 

OF Gurnee 

b io need of mature, nspoodblt people Tar the roUowing positions: 

• noCISEKKEPERS 

• WAITERS /WAiniESSES 

• FRONT DESK CLERK 

• SECRET/lBY 

• SBT-OP 

• GEEVERAL M/UVTEN/LNCE 

FnHatviPmtt Tim* ApalahU • Ratinmt A Saniori fTalcoma 

Excellent opportunities! Paid vacations! Holiday Inn 

employee dlscountsl Please apply in person. 

Grand Ava. at the TrI-State Tollway 




KING 



Come Join Our Team 

At the New Gumee Mitts 

BURGER KING 

•COMPETITIVE STARTING WAGE 

• FLEXIBLE HOURS 

•OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT 

We Have A Number oE Shifts Open 

DAYS/NIGHTS 

FULUPARTTIME 
We train you to work In an enjoyable 
atmosphere with supervisors and managers 
who want to see you succeed. 

708*855-1307 

ASK FOR DON 



HelpWanted 
Fuli:Timc 




IlelpWantcd 
Full-Timc 




CLERK III 

The Lake County Health 
Depanmeni has an opening In our 
Wauconda Environmental Health 
otfioe for a full-time deilt. Excellent 
dcn'cal skills and typing ol 65 WPM 
are required. Experience in word 
processing and data entry helpful. 
Salary range: $16,467 -'$19,925 
Contad Personnel Ollioe at 708^360- 
6703 lor an application and 
appointment (or a typing lest Lalte 
County Heaiih Depariment, 3010 
&and Avenue, Waukegan, IL 60085, 
Smolte-lree environment EOE NVF 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Growing Lake Foresl 
Firm needs bright, 
friendly person to ^handle 
phones, parform clerical 
functions & assist with 
accounting duties. Light 
typing. Data entry, 
Pleasant Personality & 
Phone manner required. 

8:00 am -5 '.GO pm 
Call George 

(708)816-7777 







I 



I 



PARA PROFESSIONAL 

needed at Mundeleln High 
School for supervision 
duties for thcl991-92 

school year. Some college 

preferred, but not required. 

Applications are available 

irom the front office at: 

MUNDELEIN HIGH 

SCHOOL 

laSOWHawleyStreet 

Mundeleln, I L 

Between the hours of 

8:00a.m.-3;30p,m. 

Ibr further Informalion please call: 

(708)949-2199 



TELLER 


1 
1 


American National Bank 




of Libertyville, a leader in 




the banking industry, Is 




seeking a full time teller. 




Teller experience Is 




preferred, but not 


1 


necessary. Cash handling 


-^ 


experience is a must. 


' 


We offer competitive 




salary and excellent 




growth potential. Call Brian 




Winchar at 




(708) B16-4288 


1 


AMERICAN 


i 


NATIONAL BANK 




OF LIBERTYVILLE 


i 


1202 S.Milwaukee 


1 
1 


Libertyville. IL 60048 




Equal Opportunity Errployer 


! 



RETAIL 
A GREAT OPPORTUNTIY 

[Our fun. fast-paced DOLLAR BILL$ store sells everylhing 
[for $1 . We seek high energy, sell mcAivated individuals to 
Ijoln our fast growing company. Great pay and grovrth 
lopportunity. Now hiring cashiers, stock personnel and 
I management lor our new k>cation in Round Lake Beach. 
Apply in Person Monday 8/15 through a'24 
from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm at 

DOIX^R BUX^ 

754 E. Rollins Rd. (in the f^allaid Creek Shopping Center) 
EOE 



BUS DRIVERS 

for Warren Township High School 

Cantdidate must be experienced 

Candidate must have a CDL 

License 

BUILDING/GROUNDS 
SECURITY PERSONNEL 

Warren Township High School 

Interested applicants must apply to: 

Mr. Patricia McMahon, 

Superintendent 

by Friday, August 23, 1991 

Warren Township High School 

500 N. 0*PIaine Road 

Gurnee, IL 60031 



Factory 



Material Handlers^ 

Motorola's Cellular ^ 
Distribution Center 



For those desiring part time woric only! 
Work 1 week every month... 

Motorola Cellular has a unique opportunity for 
reliable individuals in our Distribution Center. 
Positions will involve materia! handling, light pack- 
ing and general shipping duties. Work the last 
week of every month for a 6-day, 8-10 hour shift, 
• Thesejobs offer a generous starting salary of 
$8.00 per hour • On the job training • 2 shifts 
available • Work 1 week, lake 3 weeks offl 

For immediale consideration, you must apply in 
person, Monday through Friday. 9:00AM unlil 
3;00 PM at Motorola. Inc. Cellular Employment 
Otfices. 3201 N. Wilke Road, Arlington Heights. 
IL 60004. Motorola welcomes and encourages 
diversity in our workforce. 




a t' 



Friday, August 16. 1991 



lakotand Newspopois 37 



r"**Tr-;rAfv^"f --,',' ■.•-*»-,^< — -—^ 



■ i r i£»vtM x^1tKs4fV^- ^t^ ' "^* t ^*" '*-J---'-* 



i5~S=si5St^te?=^-? 






ii' 







IIelpWantcd_,_i 
Full-Time 




HelpWanted_,— . 
Full-Timc 



IIclpWanlGd_^_i 
Full-Timc 




fflPPLE PICKERS 

fiPPLE SORTERS 

and 

Sf^LES HELP 

NEEDED 

Apply in person: 
Oriole Springs 

Orchard 
Twin Lai<es, Wl 

(414) 877-2436 



SCHOOL AGE 
PUOGRAM 
OIRECTOR 

Responsible for developing, 
planning, organizing and 
controling school ego 
program. Administrative 
experience essential. Must 
meet IL-DGFS educational 
requirements. Bachelors 
degree, masters degree 
preferred. Sala^ to 
commensurate with 

experience and education. 

YWCA 

2133 Bdvldcrc Bd. 

Waulccgon) JL 



FULL TINE 

SERVICE STATION 

ATTENDi&NT 

PART TIME 
CASHIER 

Evening and weekend 
hours avaitable. 

AMOCO 
LAKE FOREST 

Call {708)234-3707 
Ask for Lonnie 



RETAIL SALES 

Must be pleasant 

individual willing to 

do various duties and 

be meciianlcally 
inclined. We tiave 3 

locations. 
Apply in Person at: 
Collins Fireplace & 

Patio Shop 
115 N.Genesee St. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

(Downtown Waukegan) 

<708) 662-0440 



R£C£pnoiiiisr 

With additional 
office duties. Entry 
level position, 37- 
1/2 hours per week. 
Located in Vernon 
Hills. 

Call 

(708)367-3600 

Ask for Dave 



^ 



UueincBs 
QpporluniticB^ 

WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS. Toning tables. 
New Commercial-Home 
units, from $199. Lamps, 
lotions, accessories. 
Monthly payments as low 
as $18. Call today for Free 
Color Catalog (800)462- 
9197. 

22-i)a-135 




Shop For A New Gar 

Turn To The Lakeland Classifieds! 



OPPORTUNITY 
FOR FINANCIAL 

FREEDOM 

Be your own boss and have 
the time and money to live 
Ihe lifestyle you want. Will 
train if you have the courage 
to call. 

(708) 216-9719 

24 Hours 




MEDICAL OPPORTUNITIES 



CERTIFIED 
NURSE AIDE 

The Grove School, Lake 
Forest, serving DD Ado- 
lescents & young adults, 
is seeking Illinois 
Certified Nurses Aides 
(CNA), to join our team. 
Both a.m. and p.m. 
positions available. Ex- 
cellent pay, benefits. 
Quiet, beautiful sun-ound 
ings. Own transportation 
required. Call: 

(708) 234-5540 
I 6-5. M-F 



1 



RN/LPN 

We now have a pail 

time position open 

for RN/LPN. It 

interested, 

Contact 

Sister Mary 

DON 

MOUNT 

ST. JOSEPH 

I (708)438-5050 






Lakeland Classifieds 
Get tlie Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



DIRECT 

GARB 

WORKERS 

Immediate openings 
for weekends. Willing 
to train individual. 
Work with severely & 
profoundly mentally 
retarded women. 
Contact 
Sister Arlene 

MOUNT ST. 
JOSEPH'S 

(708)438-5050 






CERTIRED 
HABIUTAT10N AIDE 

The Grove School, Lake 
Forest, serving DD ado- 
lescents and young 
adults is seeking an 
Illinois Certified Habil 
itation Aide (CHA) to join 
our team. Both a.m. and 
p.m. positions available 
Excellent pay, benefits, 
quiet, beautiful surround 
ings. Own transportation 
required. Call: 

(708) 234-5540 
8-5, M-F 



(iVIglits) 

The Grove School Is 
eceklng Certliled Nurebig 
AeslflUnta (CNA) to Join 
our team. One full-time; 2 
part'Ume poalUons avail* 
able now, 10:90pm-6i30ani, 
Excellent pay, beneflte. 
Quiet , beautiful fluiround- 
Inge. Own transportation 
required. Call: 

E. Robert Matson 

The Grove School 

(708) 234-5540,84, M-F. 



OPPORTUIVITIES 

The Lake County Health 
Doparimont lias Ihe.lollowing 
opfiorluniiies available: 

Full 4 Part TimQ Positions are in 
Iho res'KJonlial alcoholtsm program 
located in Waukegan as part ol a 
comprohonsive chemical dcpsn 
doncy loam. 

RN needed lor InnovaiivD chemical 
dependency program lor women 
and children thai is located in 

UljeilyvillB. 

Ploaso sand resume to Personnol 
OltlcB, Lake County Hoalih 
Ooparlmoni, 3QtO Grand Avonuo. 
Waukegan, IL 60085. Smoke Free 
Environment EOE MIF 



HOME 
HEAUm NURSE 

Nurses, do you want: 

• Daytime hours? 

• A challenging and 
creative position? 

• Competitive salary 
and [iborai benefits? 

Tho Lake County Health Daparl- 
monl. NurtJng DMslon, b looking a 
Homo Healtti Nurte lo provide 
nursing caro, domonstralion, and 
hoaMi odjcadon lo patients h ttelr 
home. Job requlromonts: Dacholor 
ol Sclonce In Muring prolerrod, 
rocenl hosplial sxporiencB required, 
current Illinois Nurdng llceniuro. 
Coolact: Porsonnal Olflce, t7M) 
360-5959. Lake County Health 
OopartmonI, 3010 Grand Avo., 
Waukegan. IL 6O0B5. Smoko-froo 
onvironmonl An Equal Opponunlly 
/ AtlvTDativo ficion Empkiyor. 



CERTIFIED 
NURSING ASSISTANTS 

A skilled intermediate care facility has openings for full- 
part time individuals. Competitive salary & benefits 
available. If you enjoy worWng with and fielping our 
senior citizens lead a richer & fuller lifestyle through 
your care, contact: 

Libertyville Manor 

61 Peterson Rd. • Libertyville, IL 
(708) 367-6100 



BuaincHH 
Opporlunilio8 







EASY WORK. GR£Ar PAY 

You Must Type Wail or 

Have Good Handwriting. 

Hours & Location Flexible. 

Gall now for details 

1-800-783-8946 

Ext. 510 




Work 
Wanted 



LET ME DO YOUR 
WORK. Tired of coming 
home and having lo clean 
house? Let me do it for 
you. References available. 
Responsible. Roni at 
(414)652-4991. 

23-TF-101/K2 

WANTED: 
CONSTRUCTION 
Laborer with siding, 
carpentry or concrete 
experience. Call (815)943- 
3167. 

23-34-38 



Clijld Care 




HAWTHORN WOODS- 
CHILD care Needed In 

our home. Must have 
references. Own 

transportation, MWF. Call 
Mary eves or vi/l<ends, 
(708)566-2225. 
MUNDELEIN AREA- 
Responsible, trusting 
teenager to sit for my 6 yr 
old daughter in my Home 
Tues and Wed. eves and 
occasional weekends Call 
after 5p.m. (708)949-4494 
24-34-134 



HOUSEKEEPING 

Geriatric Nursing Facility 
has a full time opening for 
a Housekeeper. Compell- 
llvc Salary and benefits 
available. If you enjoy 
working with and helping 
our senior citizens lead a 
rieher and Tullcr lifestyle 
through your care, 
contact: 

UBERTYVILLE MANOR 

610 Pclcraon Rd., Ubertyvlllc, IL 

(708) 367-6100 



MEDICAL 

LABORATORY 

TECHNICIAN 

Tired of a hospital 
setting? Like children? 
Our busy Pediatric 
Office Laboratory is 
looking for an 
enthusiastic ASCP 
Certified or eligible MLT 
to Join our laboratory 
staff. To find out more 
about our full or part 
time openings, please 
call lab manager at: 
(708) 295-2260 



HEncu. 



RN'S 



YOUR INVITATION 
TO QUAUTY! 

Victory Momorial IHospital would 
IkQ lo Invite you to join a quaJity 
onvironmonl il\al values your idoas 
and prolossional concern. Ttirough 
our Quality Leadorstiip Process, 
Victoiy einployoos are encouraQOd 
to oltor suogosiions and solutions 
lo entrance Viclory's quality ol 
caro. Your tdoas aro invaluable at 
Victory Momorial Hospital. Full and 
pan lima opporluntlios currently 
exist for RN'S, 

EMERGENCY 

Bo part of the grand oponlng ol our 
brand now deparlmonl 

INTERMEDIATE CARE 
Exporlenco ilio challenge ot 
cardiac stepdown as well as 
spacious patient rooms and now 
nursos station. 

SENIOR SUPPORT 

Expand your geriatric nursing 
abilities to an acute care setting. 

OBSTETRICS 

Our IDRP rooms In llio now family 
center provide state-of-the-art OB 
experience. 

For moro infomiaiion on your value 

to Viclory, ploaso call: 

Cindy Ball.Sr. Staffing Analyst 

708-360-4170 

VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 
Waukagan.lL 60085 

Bjual oppottunlly employer m/t 



Child Care 



]^H. 






SEEKING LOVING 

DAY care for (2)gir1s, ages 
1 & 4, in my Gumee home. 
{Grandwood Park). 3 days 
per week, Tuesday thru 
Thurs, 8a,m. to 6p.m. Own 
transportation. References 
requested. (708)356- 
3886. after 6p.m. 

Schools/ 

Infitruclion 



M 



TRAVEL CAREERS 

BEGIN at Midwest Travel 

Institute, 1301 W. 

Lombard, Davenport, Iowa 

52604. Classes; Aug. 26; 

Oct. 24; On-campus 

housing. 8-week course. 

Joint venture of AAA 

tovra/SL Ambrose Univ. CeJI 

Soon. (800)747-3434. 

TRAVEL-CAREERS 

begin at Midwest Travel 

Inst., 1301 W. Lombard, 

Davenport, lA, 52804. 

Classes: Aug. 26; Oct. 24. 

On-Campus housing. 8- 

week coursel Joint 

venture of AAA lowa/St. 

Ambrose Univ. Call Soon. 

(800)747-3434. 



SUPER OPPORTUNITY 

For person with good mochanlcal 
apliluds & communlcalion sidlls to 
learn the exciting Held ot 
Industrial Insirumentatlon. 4 
month training program will 
prepare you to slan as a sales 
engineer in this lucatrive lield. 
Earning polenllal d $20 - S80.000 
or more per year. Guaranteed |ob 
placement alter successful 
completion of training program. 
Student leans available to 
qualified applicants. 

(708) 356-8200 







r?.; '.•;■. :*^ 



•t 



N£ED 
A 

NEW 

COAT? 

CHECK THE 
CLASSIFIEDS! 
From painters 
to antique fiirs' 
...we cover the 
market place. 
When you're 
looking to buy, 
sell or rent just 
about anything 
at all, look to .. 
.the Qassifieds!." 



Lakeland '.;,: 
.' Ncwspoper'a ^}u 
Qosslfleds ir' 






C708D I 







SERVICE OrRECTOKY 




Carpentry 



CUSTOM DECKS, 
General carpentry, 
superior-craftsmanship at 
compQtive prices. P.E. 
Construction (708)966- 
2590 or (708)336-4952. 
87-34-127^ 

Concrete/ 
Cement 



Handyman 



S14 



l_ Z7_ 

m 



BASEMENT WALLS 
CRACKED OR 

BULGING?? We can 

correct the problem quickly 
and simply with GRIP-TITE 
Wall Anchors. For 
Appointment Call (800)541- 
9 433. _ 

Education/ 



HANDYMAN- REMOD- 
ELING Kitchens, baths, 
doors and windows 
installed, electrical, ceiling 
fans, carpentry, plumbing 
repairs, faucets, redding, 
garage door openers 
installed, water heaters 
Installed, rototilllng lawns 
and gardens. Free 
Estimates. (708)546-3177. 
S14-30/TF-97_ 



SI 9 



Instruction 



Sll 



BECOME A 

PARALEO.AL. Join 
America's fastest growing 
profession. Work with 
attorneys. Lawyer 
instructed home study. 
The finest paralegal 
program Available. Free 
catalog. (800)362-7070. 
Dept, LJ733. 

S11-00-_21 

lib 



Laundry/ 
Cleaning 

WILL He LEAN YOUR 
HOUSE, APARTMENT 
OR OFFICE - Honest and 
dependable. Quality work at 
affordable prices. Call for an 
appointment today. Ask for 
Ron! (414)843-4041. 
S19-TF-118 



S25 




ENCYCLOPAEDIA 
BRITANNICA*USA 

Back-to-School specials 
Call Tom (708) 949-7656 



Painting/ 
Decorating 

AN EDUCATOR 

LOOKING for painting 
and wallpapering jobs. Free 
estimates and reasonable 
rates. References. 
(708)746-1792. 

S25-33-8 1 - 

Profceflional 
ScrviccB 



S31 



^ PIANO LESSONS/ 
•* Immed'tatB Openings ^ 
;J Availatid ^ 

•^'Beginning lo Advanced ^ 
^•15 years piano teaching ^ 
*I experience jjj 

^•Master's degree in ^ 
i music ^ 

^ Call (708) 438-0492^ 



LEGAL SERVICES. 
Legal Hot Line. Divorce, 
credit, DWI, Drug arrest, 
etc. Attorneys' recorded 
information $3.95 per 
minute. Max. 5 
minute/$19.75. 
1 (900)9B8-LEGAL(5342). 
S3 1-00-32 



IMPROVE Tll£ 

PERFORMANCE OF 

YOUR VEHICXE 

Froo dolalls. WrHe Jo; 

ISA, 251 BO Wosl Pino Lano 

Arflloch.lL 60002, Or call 

(708) 395-0169 



Legal 
ServiccB 



S2-1 



Legal 
Services 



I 



■"^ CHAPTER 13 
Bankruptcy 

NO MONEY DOWN 

Means Just fhati We Advance The $120 Filing Fee. 

708-263-0123 




Available 7 days a week. 
Also available for evening appointments. 

L. Korrub, Attorney at Law 

S* 5 S. County Ri. B3 Across Irom K-Mart 

Waukegan Round Lake Beach 




Barter/ 
Trade 





TRADE OR SALE- 
1377 Lincoln. Good 
condition. Trade for 
motorcycle, snowmobile, 
golf cart, truck, or ?? 
(708)587-7217. 

G32-30/32-37/L 



Building 
IVIalerialB 



FREE- FOUNDATION 
CONCRETE chunks 

for landfill or seawalls. You 
haul. (815)678-4814. 
34-33-16 



Sell Your Home 

In the Lakeland Classifieds! 
Call 

(708)223-8161 
(800)442-8161 



^^'^ 




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38 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, August 16, 1991 




REMOD- 

ns, baths, 
windows 
cal, ceiling 
, plumbing 
;, rodding, 
openers 
)r heaters 
lling lawns 
s. Free 
)546-3177. 
F-97 _ 




M YOUR 
ARTMENT 

Honest and 
ality wor!< at 
J. Call for an 
jay. Ask for 
4041. 
-118 




JCATOR 

ar painting 
tg jobs. Free 
reasonable 
ferences. 




ERVICES. 

IB. Divorce, 
I rug arrest, 
i' recorded 
$3.95 par 
Max. 5 

iAL(5342). 

10-32 



AlVCEOF 
EmCLE 

.. Witto to: 
ist Pino Lano 
OOe.Orcall 

»5-0169 




ifromK-Mart S 
ike Boach 9 



ifVN 

igFee. 



nts 
IW 




SUNDATtON 
E chunks 

' seawalls. You 

78-4814. 

33-16 




m 







MiBccllancou 



FIREWOOD FOR 
SALE* Mixed seasoned 
wood. $50 per face cord, 
delivered. (708)746-6407. 
38-34-114 

CaragcT" 

Itu m m agcS alctl 



^ 



1153 Hummingbird 

Ln. Grayslalte- {Hunters' 
Ridge next to 
Fairgrounds) Aug. 17 and 
18. Furniture, curtains, 
books, knickknacks, and 



more. 



40-33-20 



GARAGE SALE- 

Sn'owbtower, clothes, toys, 
weights, etc. 3326 
Huntington Lane, Island 
Lake, (176 and Hale) Aug. 
16-18, 8a.m. to 4p.m. 
HOUSE SALE- SAT. 
ONLYII 

Aug. 179am.to4p.m. 
216 Homewood, 
Ubertyviile. (Off 176 and 
Brainerd) Follow signs. 
Antique table, furniture, 10 
speed bike, toys, weights, 
camping gear, 

plumbing/lighting fixtures, 
hand tools and much more. 



ESHTAXe SALE 

Saturday, August 17th 

and 

Sunday, August 18th 
Rte. 45 & Port CUnton Road 

(1/4 mile West of 
Rte. 21 / Milwaukee Avenue) 

Somediiiig for Evetyone! 



IIor&eH & 
Tack 



m 




BALED SHAVINGS - 1 or 

1,000 bates. Cash and 
Carry. Norton Bros., Bristol, 
Wis. (414)857-2525, 
Monday through Friday, 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 8 
a.m. to 3 p.m. 

HORSES WANTED ■ 
Buy, Sell, trade horses, 
ponies, trailers, saddles, 
etc. Top Price paid, 
f 41 4^594-2278. 

LlouBcholtlH/ 

Furnilurc 



"St 



MOVING SALE- 

Bedroom, living and 
dining room furniture, TV, 
(708)244-8331. 

43-33-101 
SOFA BED, queen 
size gray, excellent 
condition, Org .$750. for 
Best offer. (708)662-8322. 
10 PIECE PINE dining 
room set, excellent 
condition. Baby Grand 
Piano, will pay for tuning, 
Louis Icart . f^ignot. 
(708)459-7814. 
COLLEGE BOUND? 2 
Pine loveseats with plaid 
cushions, matching end 
table, black Naugahyde 
recliner, brass/glass coffee 
and end tables, 
reasonable. (708)816- 
3130. 

43-33-111 



llouBcholde/ 
Furnilure 

6-1/2ft.(80") BIG 
SCREEN TV with remote 
$1,200 or best offer, 
Beautiful 5 piece pit group 
couch - beige-$750. King 
and queen size watertieds- 
Your choice $175, several 
beds-all Gizes, $65-$150, 
living room couches $25- 
$125, Combined two 
households. Everything 
iVlust Gol (708)356-8209 
after 5o.m. 

SMALL LIVING ROOM 
couch, good condition, 
brown, $35, Arm chairs, 
$10 each. (312)235-0483. 
RCA 25" Solid wood 
console cabinet, color TV. 
Needs minor repair $75. 
RCA am/fm solid wood 
record player stereo 
combination cabinet $75. 
Call after 5p.m. (708)546- 
7080. 

Lawn/ 
Garden 




MOWERS MOWERS, 

MOWERS $35. and up No 
riders. (708)546-4309. 



Lawn/ 
Garden 




NORDSTROM 

TREE 
EXPERTS CO. 

Land Clearing 

Tree Removal 

& Stumps 

Seasoned Hardwood 

Fully Insured 

(708)526-0858 



LARGE ABSOLUTE 
NURSERY STOCK AUCTION 

Gumee, IL 1/4 mile east of Rte. 21 on Rte. 132 (Grand 
Ave.) Former Rustic Manor Parking lot 



Rain SUNDAY, 

or AUGUST 18th, 1991 

Shine TIME: 11 :00 AM SHARP 



Invontory ffom local nurseries. All slock is Held o'own, ffosh dug, 
approximaloly 200 lots ol nurso^ stock will bo sold. It all sells 
absolutely. Your only chance ta buy excellent quality tiui^ety stod< a 
yourprlco. Bring your irudc and trailer. Loading asslstanco sale day. 



W)TL' Haling ccntracfcr w|] 
be on Kuctlan stia diy ol 
tt\9. TERMS: CASH OR 
GOOD CHECK. All STOCK 
TO BE PAID IN FULL 
AUCTION DAY PRIOR TO 
LOADING. 



Call Auction Company 

for information 

POWERS AUCTION SERVICE 

Crystal Lake. IL 
Mike Powers (815) 455-1496 
Dan Powers (60S) 966-3760 



MiBccllancou 




>^A 



ICE MACHINE, 

Manitowoc, 400 lb. cap., 
runs well, 6 yrs old, $500. 
Gall Vickie or Joanne 
(815)385-2014. 
NATURAL MINK size 
10, Azurene mink stroller 
coat, like new, $1,250 
(708)259-4758. Leave 
message. 

45-33-112 



MiHccllancou 



KENMORE HEAVY 
duty electric dryer, 
excellent condition. $125, 
(708)680-8149. 

45-33-99 
SOLOFLEX with 

butterfly $1,000 value 
asking $700. (708)740- 
1864. after 6p.m. 

45-33-63 



^^^ 



Muflical 
Inalrumcnle 



POOL TABLE FOR 
Sale, regulation size, solid 
slate, plus all accessories, 
$500 or best offer. 
(708)395-8163. After 6am. 

45-33-79 
1981 ELDORADO, 
$2,500. 1979 F-150 with 
cap and bedliner, $1,400. 
Full dress Honda 750cc, 
$750. O'Brien Windsurfer 
$450. (414)877-3259. 
4fl BATHROOM 

VANITY base with single 
basin olive green and white 
top, $125. Bit. black and 
white vinyl couch with 
matching chair, $75. 
Ker\more solid state 
microwave; needs tube, 
$100. or best. (708)587- 
4975. 

BIRDLOVER'S 
SPECIAL. Birdhouses, 
clocks, wood carvings, 
squirrel feeders, lawn 
markers. On Hwy 50, 1 mile 
W. of New Munster. Wl 
(414)537-4677. 

45-33-84 
WHEELCHAIR- 
Everest and Jennings, 
Adult size, excellent 
condition. $350. (708)587- 
2594. 

MANCO GO-CART 
8hp, average speed 35- 
40 mph. Great fun for 
summer and winter. 
Original price $1,000 
asking $650. Firm. 
(708)831-2800 days or 
(708)395-4569 eves. Ask 
for Gene. 

1985 TRAC MOPED, 
2-speed, automatic, with 
fielmets, runs good, $100. 
Queen size waterbed with 
linens and Stereo 
headboard, Good 
condition $100. 6-pc. dark 
brown Pit-Group, good 
linens and Stereo 
headboard. Good 
condition $100. 6-pc. dark 
brown Pit-Group, good 
condition, $100. (708)689- 
2568. 

DIAMOND RING. Size 
6-1/4, $100. (414)843- 
2683. after 5p.m. 
GOLF CLUBS. Full 
set, with leather bag, 
plus 8 pull cart, new 
glove, dozen baits, 
$475. or best. 
(708)566-4956. 
RESTAURANT 
Equipment, everything and 
anything. (414)653-0574. 

5,000 BTU 

WESTINGHOUSE air 

conditioning unit, 2 yrs old, 
$200. Call Rich (708)587- 
2970. 



Wanted 
To IJuy 




^R 



10 PIECE DRUM SET, 

metallic blue with Zildjian 
cymbals. For more info call 
after 5p.m. (708)546- 
1241. 

46-33-44. 





Fete & 
SupplicB 



TEDDY BEAR 
HAMSTERS- 8 weeks 
old. FREE to good home. 
Call (414)857-7766, 
Between 6p.m. and 8p.m. 
47-TF-1/K/G 

TWO COCKER 

SPANIEL pups, 6 weeks 
old. male, purebred, $100. 
(414)694-5666 after 4 p.m. 

47-34-59 
BEAUTIFUL FEMALE 
SAMOYED. 1-1/2 yr. old. 
$150. Needs a good 
Home. (708)587-5776. 

47-33-9 
FAWN AND BRINDLE 
Great Dane puppies. 
Champion sired, AKC 
registered, Cropped, 
wormed, and shots. Pet 
and show quality. $450 and 
up. Call after 5p:m. 
(414)248-2597. 

47-30/TF-117/K 




TooIb & 
Machinery 



^n 



GOODALL, STAHTALL 

708 starting unit, Koehler 
8hp engine, Excellent 
condition, $1,400 new, 
Asking $650. or best. 
(708)546-3294. 

48-33-105 

TOO L ROOM 

EQUIPMENT- ELOX 

E.D.fyl.. Machine $4,800. 
Boylar Schultz Surface 
Grinder, $2,600, Tool 
cutter/grinder air flow head, 
$450. (815)385-7137. . 
K48.30/36-169/L 



Wanted 
To IJuy 




HIGHEST CASH PAID 
FOR OLD TRAINS AND 
TOYS - Call me before 
selling. (708)699-0268. 

49-42-116 
SLOT MACHINES- Any 
condition, for parts, Also 
Old Wuriitzer Juke Boxes, 
paying cash, (708)985- 
2742. 

49-35-1 15/K 



MEMORCiBILIIi 

from 

Kl Kl POO 

I'nn looking for ANYTHING from a 

Rock festival (Ki Ki Poo) that was held 

near Hainesvilie in the late '60's. 

• Buttons • Programs 

• T-Shirts • Paraphernalia 

PLEflSE CALL 
(317) 644-9109 




FISCHER ESTATES TUDOR 

Breathtaking hilltop acre featuros four 
bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, formal living & dining 
rooms, first floor family room with fireplace. 
Large eat-In kitchen, full basement, 3 car 
garage. $292,000. Call Kim Schnoor - 

ReMax Advantage Realty 
395-7900, cxt. 149 






SBII 



Rent 



llomes 
For Sale 



]fi 



llomee 
For Sale 




llomes 
For Sale 




GRAYSLAKE- 
"OUTSTANDING 
charm" In this 4 
bedroom, 2 bath Cape 
Cod, Home features new 
roof, wood siding and all 
new windows. Interior is 
completely updated and 
professionally decorated, 
highlighted by a large eat-in 
kitchen. All of this on a 
large lot in a great 
neighborhood! $134,900 
(708)223-9518 308- 
Hightand. 

50-34-129 
ANTIOCH AREA- Lake 
Shangri-la, Beautifully 
rehabed 2 bedroom house 
with lakeview, and 
screened porch, $70,000 
(708)965-1842 or 
(708)965-7416. 

50-33-102 
FOX RIVER VALLEY 
Gardens, off Roberts Rd. 
immaculate with spacious 
yard, 2 bedroom with large 
master, large newer 
kitchen, new carpet, all 
appliances, 2-1/2 car 
unattacfied heated gamge, 
central air, $109,900 
(708)516-1210. 

50-34-128 
KENOSHA- NEW 
ENERGY EFFIECENT 
3 bedroom home. Oft 
raised beamed ceiling. 
Volted bathroom ceiling. 
Full basement. Close to 
school, shopping and park. 
Low $80's (708)746-2462. 

50-33-33/K 

LOVELY MANU- 

FACTURED HOME 1- 
1/2 acre. 2 bedrooms new 
siding, partial basement, 
shingled roof w/6" 
insulation, garage, 2 wells, 
12x12 utility shed, under 
$40,000 Rte. 4 box 22 
Watoma, Wise. 54982 
(414)787-7230. 

50-29/33-1 56/K 
WATERFRONT- ROOMY 
ranch 3 bedroom, fireplace, 
deck, includes extra lot. 
Long Lake by owner $90's 
(708)480-5760 or 
(708)945-3442 eves. 

50-30/34-131 
LIBERTYVILLE- 
Updated Ranch. Good 
.schools. Close to toll way, 
shopping, and trains. 4 
miles west of Base 
$103,900. (708)362-3561. 



FOR SALE BY 
OWNER. 180ft.. 
waterfront on Pistakee ' 
Lake, 3 bedroom, 1-1/2 
story, all newly 
redecorated, aprx. l/2-i- 
acres, fenced, 2+car 
garage with workshop, 
Small bam, large dog run, 
garden, fruit, berries, 
I^UST SEEI Price 
includes 21 ft Citation I/O 
and trailer $196,500 
(708)497-3426 No 
BrokersI (708)497-3426. 
50-33-36 

BUILD YOUR OWN 
HOME. Mllos 

provides materials with 
no down payment and 
below market 

construction financing. 
DO-IT-YOURSELF and 
Save! Miles Homes: 
(800)782-2359. 
50-00-25 

BURLINGTON.WI. 
3,000 sq.ft., 4 bedroom 
AS IS farmhouse on 2-1/2 
acres. 140x50 ft. pole bam, 
close to Fox River and III. 
border $81,900 (414)421- 
,8582. 

50-33-91 /K 



FOX RIVER: Gorgeous 

3 acre or larger parcels on 
quiet, Braver Rd. 
Burlington. Fishing, 
boating, horses. 15 
minutes to Geneva Lakes 
or Kenosha Dog tracks. 
Only $11,000 per acre. 
(414)421-8582, 
WATERFORD, FOX 
RIVER watorfronl 
home, beautifully 
remodeled and 

updated, 2 bedroom, 
large country kitchen, 
finished basement, 2 
car garage, beautiful 
lot and pier, $117,900 
By owner. (414)534- 
6095. 

50-33-93/K 
GURNEE OPEN 

HOUSE- Sun. 12 to 5p.m. 
2 yr old Colonial, 4 
Lawson Blvd. off Rte.132 & 
Dilley. 

50-34-91 



KENOSHA WISCONSIN 
MANSION 
Lakelront location In A!lendal9 araa. 3 
story trkk 7.000f sq. ft oo approx t acre. 
GBRs, eaAs, 4FRPt. Near Malna. Undar 
$400,000. Rease contact Mlka S^ankii ot 
RsMax Kenosha. Ca9 clloo al (414) 694- 
StaOoc Home (414) 552-7415. 




McHenry County 

Great In-Law or Office Set-Up. 

Insulatecj garage, huge fenced 

yar(d, beautiful water view, neutral 

decor, well maintained. 

Call: Ann Conners 

(708) 395-0439 

(708) 395-5900 





EQUAL HOUSINO 

LENDER 



All roal estate adveriisfng in tills newspaper 
is subject to the Fair Housing Act oF 1968 
which makes It Illegal to advertise 'any 
preference, limitation or discrimination based 
on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial 
status or national origin, or an Intention to 
make any such preference, limitation or 
discrimlnaU'on, 







LIMITED TIME OFFER ^^C 

Build Your Home This Winter 
Pick Big Savings! 

Get Choice of one of the 
follo^ving 

• 3 FREE GE* APPLIANCES 
(Siove, Rcfrigoralor, DighwaBticr) 

• 50% OFF ALL Your Appliances 

• 50% OFF Mcrillal® Cabinet Upgrades 
and choice of Two Appliances 



ZUmmL 

Welcome Home. 




m^f£at 



AMERCAS CAttrinMAXEB' 




County Line Builders 

216 Janet Drive 

Island Lake 
708-526-8306 



Triple "A" BuUders 

34390 N. Rt. 45 

Lake Villa, IL 

708-223-7900 



Friday, AugusM 6, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapor's 39 



august 16, 1991 



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111. '" 






Ilotncs 
For Sale 




BY OWNER- Silver 
Lake, Wi. Vacant house 
needs repairs. 790 sq.ft. 
plus full basement, lots of 
privacy, with large lot. 534 
N. 5th St. $33,000. 
(414)878-3304. 

50-33-24/K3 



Rare Opportunity 
in S. Kettle Moraine 
State ForestI Four 
bedroom home, pole 
barn on mature private 
acreage surrounded by 
forest, more. 

Palmyra, WI 

Ron Simon. Rrsl Realty 

789-7321 



DONT MISS THIS! 

Brand new-bright 2-story 

• 3 big bedrooms 

• eat-in kitchen 
(oak cabinets) 

• skylit living room 

• front & rear decks 
GrayslaKe School District 

$94,500 

Call: (708) 223-0022 



GURNEE 

New Construction 

MidSO's, 

$3700 down 

FHA/VA. 

2-3 bdrms. 

1-1/2 baths, Garage, 

10yr. Warr. Call 

(708) 360-0402 

from 10-5 






OPEN HOUSE 

Sunday, August 18 

12 pm -3 pm 
1004 Cedar Lake Rd. 

Round Lake Beach. 

(On corner at Beachvlew) 
Want to work out of your 
home? Then this Is for you! 
4 bedroom, Tri-level, doubla 
lot. Commorcial business 
zoning. Only; 

$95,5001 

Call Carolyn for details 

All Star Real Estate 
Services 

(708) 356-5000 



PERFECT STARTER/ 
INVESTOR 

Cozy two bedroom InglosidB 
home has boen complotely 
renovated including new 
bathroom, l^ilchen and new 
carpeting throughout. Also new 
furnace, hot water heater, ani 
well pump. Features nice lot 
opening to field, partial 
basement and large brick 
lireplace. Perfect lor starters or 
inveslore. House is currently 
rented lor $610.00/month 
Asking $63,500. May consider 
some owner linancing to 
qualrlied buyer. Call Ralph at 
(708)390-8050x667 
(708)546-5809 
Brol^ets participation welcome 
Broker/owner 




IIome» 
For Rent 




IlomcB 
Wanted 




WAUCONDA - Comp- 
letely furnished lakefront 
home. Ideal for couple. 
(708)526-7586 Of 
(312)775-3288. 

51-/3134-137 

WAUCONDA Rental. 

Completely furnished 
lakefront home, Ideal for 
couples. (708)526-7586 or 
(312)775-3288. 

51-33-118 
FOX LAKE- Lakefront. 
Large 2 bedroom house, 
range, refrigerator, pier, 
Available Sept.1 No pets, 
References $7iJ0. month 
and security (708)587- 
1313. 

51-33-57 
FOX RIVER 

SHORES' 3 bedroom, 
2-story colonial, 1-1/2 
bath, C/Air, fireplace, 
appliances, full basement. 
$985. month plus security 
deposit No pets. SepL 1. 
(815)455-0467. 

51-33-14 
WATERFRONT ON 
CHAI N- Dock your boat at 
large Duplex house with 3 
bedrooms. Very clean. 
Family room wiUi fireplace, 
Format dining room, large 
living room, faundry room, 
extra large 2 car garage, 
100ft. frontage with 
seawall and sun deck. 
Grassy fenced yard. No 
pets. Limited to family of 
4. Fux Luke school 
district. Available Sept. 1 . 
$835. and utilities. 
(708)587-9848. 

51-34-4 
FOX LAKE- RENTAL. 
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 
lakeview/rights, 100ft. from 
water, $600 month. 
Possible option to buy. 
Available now, (708)766- 
5614. 

51-33-157 

FOX LAKE DUPLEX- 4 

bedroom, 2 bath, newly 
remodeled. Very clean. 
Family room, dining room, 
living room, laundry and 
storage, off street parking 
and fenced yard. Limited to 
family of 5. $625 month 
and utilities. Immediate 
occupancy, (708)587- 
9848. 

51-34-6 



$300. REWARDII 
"Really". House wanted, 
any condition. Must be 
reasonable. (708)587- 
4355. 



52-34-85 



ConcJos/ 
Town llomce 



«A 



FOX LAKE 

TOWNHOUSE 2 

bedroom 1-1/2 bath, den, 
central air, all appliances, 1 
car garage. $47,500 by 
Owner. (708)587-9335. 
54-33-96 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

Townhome. 2 bedroom, all 
appliances, in Meadow 
Green. $625 month. 
(708)834-0308. 

54-30/33-162/G 
ROUND LAKE 

BEACH- 2 bedroom 
lownhouse for rent, 1-1/2 
bath, garage, all electric 
appliances, including 
dishwasher with laundry 
area. $685. plus 2 month 
security deposit. Call 
(708)926-0445 after 6p.m. 

54-34-39 
VERNON HILLS. 

Clean, 2 bedroom, 1-1/2 
baths, first floor. Century 
Park Condo, Airy corner 
with 2 air conditioners, 
designer closets, washer, 
dryer. Park view, pool 
$72,500. (708)816-1847. 

54-33-98 

HMM'>4HHMHHHHMMHMMHM 

P CONVENIENT S 




R 2-&nrf, 2 Bdr, 2.1 Ba. Voluine h 
JJ Ceilings, Fireplace. Skylight. 
M CA, Ceramic THb, Fully 



H Insulated, Finished Garage 

H Wlih 

£1 Storage & 



Custom Work Area, 
Opener. Many 
N upgrades &d6slgiereitrasll 

§$107,900 
(708) 307-8153 

NHMMMHNHMHMMHHHMNM 



H 
H 
M 
H 
M 
H 
H 
H 

» 

3 




^^j^||i,Harbaur Club 

condominiums on bangs lake 

460 North Main Street 
Wbuconda. Illinois 60084 

WAUCONDA - ON PRIVATE SHORE OF BANGS LAKE 
OM.V 71 MAJNiD/AN'a-Fwz Uxmom Condo Homes Rlmain! 

• Hxccllcnt moilgages avallabte 
t Bcautirul and tranquil Mating amid quaint shopa It parks of Waucondi. 

Relax in our bcaudful hcalod pool, set sail or fish, steps from 
your door. 

Our Prices wiil Astonish Yout 

• I BR. 885 sq. ft. froinSS7,S00 
• 2 OR, 2 DA, 1118 sq. ft. fromS67^C» 

includes large Idlchen, big closels, rircplacc, baJconics, patios, 
elevator, pier; boat slips available. 

1 ml. N. of Rl. 176 to Harbou r Club 
460 N. Main — Model N2(M 

Open Daily 



Town lIonicH 



^n 



NEW SPACIOUS 

Townhome with 2 large 
bedrooms, bath, 
kitchen/den living room 
with fireplace. 2 car 
attached garage. Close to 
schools and shopping. 20 
minutes to Great Lakes. 
Shown by appointment 
Asking $79,000. 

(708)740-0244. or 

54-331 20.'G26 
NEW SPACIOUS 

Townhome with 2 large 
bedrooms, bath, 
kitchen/den living room 
with fireplace. 2 car 
attar;hed garage. Close to 
schools and shopping. 20 
minutes to Great Lakes. 
Shown by appointment 
Asking $79,000. 

(708)740-0244. or 

54-331 20/G26 
FOX LAKE 

TOWNHOME, $47,850. 3 
bedroom, garage, C/A, all 
appliances, Scenic resort 
area. Low Taxes, Assn. 
Fee. Easy Maintenance. 
(708)256-3758, (708)256- 
0470. 

64-33-33 



Mobile 
Ilomcs 




DOUBLE SECTION 
Mobile home, adult 
section. (708)662-2985. 

65-34-67 
MOTORHOME 1988 
Ford 460 "Honey- 24ft, 
self contained, sleeps up to 
6, only 13,000 miles, 
double sink, refer/freezer, 
microwave, stove/oven, TV 
antenna, Air conditioned, 
tub/shower, lots of storage, 
many extras added, asking 
$22,900. after 5p.m. 
(708)356-5230. 

55-33-89 
DeROSE MOBILE 
Home for Sale, 14x56, 2 
bedroom, central air, washer 
and dryer. (708)998-1762. 

55-33-79 



Wauconda - IM TOWH 

Senior Citizen Community. 
Almost now 1 bedroom, 1 
balh, $31 ,900. Almost new 2 
bedroom, 1 baih with export, 
$37,900. Call: 

(708) 526-5000 
For bformaSon and Appointment 



1990 ROIXOHOME 

levao' 

3 bedroom, 2 bath 
$38,500 

(414) 248-3831 

(414) 248-3958 



Rainbow 
Lake Manor 

New 81, Used Homes 
For Sale 

HOURS: 

Monday - Friday 
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Saturday 
8 a.m. -12 noon 

Evenings & Sundays 
By Appoiniment 



708-526-6813 LARKIN REALTY (4x4) 857-2891 



fTorncB 
For Rent 



VICTORIAN HOME- 
Graysl8ke-2 bedroom, 2- 
tlat, dining room, close to 
trains, laundry, includes 
heat. $675. month 
Available Sept. 1. 
(708)872-3908. 
THREE BEDROOM 
Home- Rustic exterior, 
remodeled interior. Large 
yard. No garage. $620. 
month security deposit and 
.utilities. (708)546-2013. 
LAKE VILLA HOME to 
lease 4 bedroom, 1-1/2 
bath, family room, garage, 
$875. month. Call Jane. 
Member of Lake County 
Assn. of Realtors. 
(708)546-2666. 
51-34-14 



Pioneer Estates Presents The 

1991 Rolloltom^ 







3 Bedrooms 
2 Baths 
1200 Sq. ft. 



Affordable Luxury Living In Lake Geneva 

See Our Model Home At The Walworth Comity Fair 
REGISTER FOR DRAWING 




X 414*248-3831 

ij^ij»| 1^2 Miles South of Hwy 50 on 



Cty. H Lake Geneva 




ApurltpentB 
For Rcnl 



LAKE ZURICH- 2 
bedroom apartment, 
furnished, In town. Share 
kitchen and house. 
Gentelmen preferred. 
Available now. $300. 
month. (708)438-5551 or 
(708)726-8460. 

56-32-151 

FURNISHED LAKE 
VILLA apartment. $400 
plus deposit. Utilities 
fumished, except electric. 
Preferred working singles 
or retired. No pets. 
(708)356-8397. 

56-34-88 
FOX LAKE 

APARTMENT. Large 2 
bedroom, quiet building, 
laundry facilities, $550 
includes heat. (708)587- 
4649. 

56-34-89 . 
GURNEE- QUIET 1 
bedroom apartment. 
Carpeted, air, no pets, 
$455. month includes Heat 
and water. (708)662-2441. 
leave message. 

56-34-19 
ROUND LAKE 

BEACH- Nice 2 bedroom 
with yard space. Available 
Now. $490 per month. 
(708)223-0022. 

56-33-31 
LAKE VILLA LARGE 2 
bedroom apartment. New 
carpet, eat in kitchen. 
$575. heat included. 
(708)356-9106. 

56-35-100 



•169.00 

PAYS 1ST MONTH RENT 

$300 DEPOSIT 

on 

Orro Bodrooms 

• Spacious 

• Prlvaio Balconies 

• FREE HOBt 

• Short Term Leasos avail, 

LAKEVIEW APARTMENTS 
(708)587-3277 

'nnw rMMont 1 yr, taiw 



DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

Spacious 1 & 2 bed- 
room apartments. Wall 
to wall carpel. Appli- 
ances Included, ample 
doset space. Free gas 
boat & cooking. Scenic, 
quiet country setting 
features tennis & 
basketball courts, a lot 
lot, laundry rooms. 
Sorry, no pets. 
Call Elsie 
Mon-Fri 

9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

(708)356-2002 
CquctlkxJsingOppaitiriry 



LAKESIDE 

LUXURY 

APARTMENTS! 

• Boat launching ramp 
• Private pier 

• Microwave ovens 

• Washers & dryers 
• Vaulted ceilings 

• Patios or balconies 

• Dishwashers 

• Convenient location 

(708)356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 

Lake Villa, IL 

. On Roulo 132 (Grand AvG.). 

Just east of Route 83 at tho 

soutli shore of Doop Lake 



t^ 



Professional/ 

managed by 

Management Realty 

Partners 



vWatersEdge 



vv^ 




ApurttneniB 
For Ren I 



ONE BEDROOM FOX 

LAKE waterfront, heated, 
carpeted, $500. month. 
(708)382-7318 or 
(708)587-5292. 
56-33-3 , 

APARTMENT FOR 
RENT. 1 bedroom newer 
building, near Abbott Labs 
$450. per month, 
furnished or unfurnished. 
(708)473-0285. 

56-33-120 

FURNISHED FOX 
LAKE 2 bedroom, M/2 
bath, washer, dryer, utilities 
included, (708)593-2600 
or (708)299-5442 or 
(708)587-5083. 

56-33-163 
WAUCONDA- Large 
newly redecorated 2 
bedroom. Large living and 
dining room, deck, 
appliances. Available 
immediately. Heat and 
water paid, $575. month 
Lease and security 
required. No pets. 
(708)433-0891. ' 
56-33-1 1 1 
TWO BEDROOM 

CONDO with most 
amenities to Sublet 'til May 
92, 5 minutes to base. Lake 
Bluff, $700. month 
(708)295-8156 after 4p.m. 
or (708)688-4773-base) 

56-33-1 08/G 
SUB-LEASE til 

FEB. 92 2 bedroom 
apartment Includes heat 
and cooking, washer, 
dryer, on lake. $625 month 
and security deposit. 
(708)526-2732. 

56-33-34 
VERNON HILLS- One 
and 2 • bedroom 
apartments. Ample parking, 
No pets. $560 to $645 
month, includes heat. 
(708)336-9403. 

56-33-79 
WAUKEGAN- 2 

Bedroom for rent Very 
quiet neighborhood. 
Available Sept 30. 
(708)336-8118 George or 
(708)336-3000. 

56-31/34-37/G 

LAKE ZURICH- 1 
bedroom garage 
apartment, living/dining 
room, laundry. $425. 
month plus utilities. $250 
security deposit. Available 
Sept.1 (708)438-2919. 

56-33-12 
ONE BEDROOM FOX 
LAKE waterfront, heated, 
carpeted, $500 month. 
(708)382-7318 or 
(708)587-5292. 

56-34-62/G 




58-33-112/6 

HooniH 
t'^or Kenl 



M 



5-UNIT APARTMENT 
BUILDING 

This investment offers large units including 3 
three-bedroom and 2 two-bedroom units, 
good location and extra land for additional 
building. Several units have undergone 
renovations in last several years. Rents are 
currently below market. Asking $165,000. 
For further information call Ralph at 
(708) 390-8050 x 667 
(708) 546-5809 
Broker/owner 



M 



RootnB 
For Rent 

JUST HAD ~ AN 
OPENING. Room (or 
rent In Round Lake 
Beach In private home. 
$85. week. Includes king 
size walerbed, utilities, and 
all house privileges, bar, 
pool table, big screen TV, 
fireplace. (708)546-7268 
Scott 

59-34-28 

Bub. Properl 
For Rent 



ApiB.AIomcB 
To Share 



SINGLE PERSON 

WANTED to share beautiful 
6 bedroom house, Near 9lh 
and Sheridan. (312)478- 
1510 or (708)263-0286. 



ROOM FOR RENT, 
$335 month, Spring 
Grove, Young 

executive seeking 
another lo share very 
sharp new home. 
Close to route 59, 31, 
and 173. Laundry 
facilities, cable TV, 
private phone, garage 
available. (708)665- 
4484. 

59-34-95 



^^ 



SMALL OFFICE 

SPACES to rent from 
$200. per month, and 
utilities. 1st and 2nd floors 
available. (708)395-4895. 
61-30-31 
DOWNTOWN- 
RICHMOND 
Retail/office/restaurant 
space. Rents start at $330. 
month. (312)478-8442 or 
(414)279-3994. 

61-30/33-102 



CHAIN OF LAKES 

LAKEFRONT large 
buildable lot. 300ft. 
shoreline frontage. 
$179,000 by owner. 
(708)395-1050. 

63-34-100 
ROUND LAKE 

BEACH- By owner. 
Buildable corner lot. 
LAKE rights. (708)272- 
8382. 

63-33-53 
2-1/Ji WOODED acres 
In Upper Dells, 9 minutes 
form downtown Dells, 
$8,000 (708)356-3130. 

63-33-90 
GRAYSLAKE WEST 
TRAIL III, Fully wooded 
LOT, 100'x150', citysewei 
and water, close to schools 
and lake. Call Dave 
(708)223-7429. $75,900 
or reasonable offer. 

63-34-130 



LAECB FRONT 
LOTS 

5 vacant buildable lake 

front lots on chain. 

City sewer & water from: 

$59,900 

Call Michael Lescher 

ReMax Advantage 
(708) 395-3000 



Rcfiort/Vac. 
Ronlala 




U.S. VACATION 

RESORT Coast to coast 
lifetime family membership 
Local club in Ingleside. 
Jacuzzi in-ground pool, 
camping, monthly activities, 
etc, etc, cost $6,500 
sacrifice $2,000 or best 
offer. (708)546-6542. 
64-33-70 



SAUGATUCK, MICHIGAN 

Lovoly Lakolfoni HomosI Roilromoni 
or vacailon coUagos. Woodod lols 
on Cloarbrooh Goll Courso. GatI 
Sylvia or Gooiqo Gravos at: 
RBMAX SAUGATUCK-OOUGU^S 

1-616-857-1761 



40 lakeland Newspaper* 



Friday, Augustld, 1991 



-u 



I 



LAKE VILLA 




Business Ronial. Quaint 
Olflce/Reiall 900 sq. fl. Great 
visibility Rio. 132/83. Plenty ol 
parking, possblo living quaders. 
$700/mo. 
Th« Land Office 


'■'i 

i 


INDUSTRIAL 


SPACE 


Fountain Head 


■" \ 


Industrial Park 


i 


ON Rt. 12 IN 


! 


Richmond 


■> 


Superior 2,400, 
3,400, 4,800 square 
foot units & up 


1 


$945.00 GROSS & UP 


..■i 


Office, Overhead 
Door, Dock 


1 


LAND 




MANAGEMENT 




(815) 67M771 


\ 






Lols/Acrcagc 4KKI 


\ ^ 


FurniH ^JbI 


r 



L'?^ 



1?^ 

I 






I 





'S^'r?T;» 



oin for 

d Lake 
home, 
ides king 
lities, and 
ges, bar, 
ireen TV, 
546-7268 



>'ffice 

ent from 
nth. and 
2nd floors 
95-4895. 
1 



lurant 

irt at $330. 
B-8442 or 

102 



LLA 

I. Quaint 
q. ft. Great 
3. Plenty ol 
g quarters. 
>. 

KOcc 
1S5I 



RIAL 

!E 

Head 
^Park 

2lN 
>ND 

2,400, 
^ square 
lip 

3RHEM) 




LAKES 

T large 
31. 300ft. 
frontage. 
ty owner. 
>. 
•100 

LAKE 
!y owner, 
arner lot. 
'^(708)272- 

JED acres 

s, 9 minutes 
3wn Dells, 
156-3130. 
J-90 

E WEST 

Jlly wooded 
0', city sewei 
se to schools 
Call Dave 
.9. $75,900 
offer. 
-130 



•RONT 

rs 

Ildable lake 

>n chain. 

water from: 

300 

}| Lescher 

(vantage 

5-3000 




ACATION 

)ast to coast 
membership 
n Ingteside. 
round pool, 
Ihly activities, 
est $6,500 
000 or best 
16-6542. 
3-70 



I MICHIGAN 

temosi RoUromonl 
gos. Woodod lots 
joII Courso. Call 

Graves at: 
iTUCKDOUGLAS 

57-1761 



'm 






FOR SALE- FLORIDA 

House and 3 rentals on 1.9 
acres. 40 miles north of 
Orlando. Near Leesburg 
and Ocala. Excellent 
condition. Photos, Video 
tape, and appraisal 
available. Sarmont, 
Antioch, III. $65,000 
(708)395-6066 (lie. RE 
Broker) 

65-33/36-86/K 



WISCONSIN-UPPER 
OCONOMOWOC LAKE 

300" Lako fronlago. Magnillcsm 4 
Bfl, 3 BA contemporary tiome 
whti 3 llroplaces, 1/2 tiour to 

Downtown Mliwaukoo. $429,000. 
Call ElaJno Uon at: 

pmJOEHTIAl.PBffEIIRmPnOPEnTlES 

4t4/7at<J234 Of 414/7B2-3110 



Shop For 
A New Car 

Call 
(708) 223-81 61 
(800)442-8161 



n^, 



■'"•1 



i 



§ 



BERRIEN coimr 

BllCIIiIVA]V,MIOnGiN 

Eloganl rtew conatrudlon log 
cabins sot In a t^eaviiy wooded 
community on tiie shores ol 
Clear IsKq. Only 60 miles tnom 
Chicago, cabins al Slarr Valley 
Ranch are priced Irom 
$109,500 lo $139,500. Four 
decorated nradeis. Finajicing 
available. For iniormalbn call: 

690-1800 (weekdays) 
695-5613 (weekends) 



1989 TERRY RESORT 

RV by Fleetwood, 24', self 
contained, excellent 
condition. $11,500 /best. 
(708)662-2949. 
70-34-68 

1978 PUMA pop-up 
camper, sleeps 8, with 
canopy, $975. (708)223- 
4298. 

70-34-118 

1979 GOLDEN 
NUGGET travel trailer, fully 
equipped. Year round park 
or pull. $1,500 or best 
offer. {708)526-8145. or 
(708)623-2316. 

70-33-125 
SLIDE-IN POPUP FOR 
MINI pickup. 1986 
Scamper, 7ft., stove, 
furnace, 10 gal. water, 
icebox, sink, 20 gat. 
propane. Excellent 
condition, $2,295 or best 
offer. (815)653-6306 
before 11a.m. 

70-33-124 
31ft. AIRSTREAM 
trailer mint condition, 
$4,000 or best offer. 
(312)775-6322. 

70-33-100 



.Siiowmobilcf 
ATVb 



JLl. 



Cemetery 
Lots 



s 



FOR SALE BY 
OWNER. 1 lot with 4 
graves North Shore Garden 
of Memories Cemetary. 
Priced below market value. 
Call (708)562-3986 4p.m. 



66-33/36-20 

Itoul KhIuIc 
Aliec. 



^K 



[ItfEBQYHOiTCMES 
•NATIONWIDE* 

Free Quote 

(708) 52MI0I I 

Roal Estate Wanted 



1985 YAMAHA TrI-Z 

250 runs great, must selll 
$1,200 (708)438-0010. 

71-33-139 
ARCTIC CAT 

Snowmobile, like new. 
$1,500 or best offer. 
(708)351-9229. 

71-34-23 
COMPLETELY 
RESTORED from 
frame up, 1963 Dune 
Buggy, converted to 12V, 
big engine, street legal, 
tow bar included. 
(708)537-0790. 

71-34-121 
•84 HONDA ATV, 
200m, 3 wheeler, 
excelient condition, $700 
or best. (708)546-3294. 

71-33-106 
1985 2aO-X 3 Wheeler 
$850. or best offer. 
(414)537-4924. 

71-33-87 



BoatB/Molor 
Etc. 



"^^m 



1984 DYNATRACK 
boat with trailer, 7Shp, lots 
of extras $5,000 (414)877- 
2535 after 6p.m. 
7P-.13-<i7 



UNITED STATES 
POSTAL SERVICE 

Needs Land or Existing Building 
in Fox Lake, Illinois 

Needed is a site of approximately 1 50 feet by 
234 feet or 35,000 net useable square feet; 
or an existing building of approximateiy 
5,152 square feet on a suitable site. 

The preferred area is bounded on the; 
North -Grand Avenue/Route 132 
South - Hiilcrest Drive as Extended 
East - Route 59 
West -U.S. Highway 12 

Proposed site size excludes additional area 
needs for setback, septic or other special 
requirements. Existing building space must 
moot Federal Handicapped Accessibility 
Standards at time of occupancy or be ca- 
pable of being modified to meet such. All 
offers must he submitted on the proper U. S. 
Postal Service forms. The United States 
Postal Service reserves the right to negotiate 
with any and all offerors. 

Information packages and forms may be ob- 
tained at the Fox Lake, Illinois MAIN POST 
OFFICE. 

For additional details or to submit offers, call 
or write; 



uj — r* 

u 




Gandace K. Prewitt 

Real Estate Specialist 

Chicago Facilities Service Center 

United States Postal Service 

222 S. Riverside Plaza 

Suite 1200 

Chicago, IL 60606 6155 

Telephone: (312) 765-5360 



I 



Proposals shnuld be received by Ihe U. S. 
Postal Service before close of business, 
430pm, Friday, September 6, 1991. 



Boate/Molor 
Etc. 



]^ 



MUST SELLIl Low 
hours. 1987 27ft Carver 
Montego, Sleeps 4, can 
be seen at Chain O'Lakes 
Marina. (700)587-6222 or 
(312)286-4625. 
72-35-49 

1982 19ft BonicrafI 
open bow 125hp 
Chrysler and Charlotte 
trailer. Transom and floor 
need repair. $3,500. 
(708)546-7080. after 
5p.m. 

72-33-18 

CABIN CRUISER. 

Fiberglass $14,000. 
29(t, 1969 Twin GM V6, 
140hp, t/O, sleeps 6, 
(708)678-0702 or 
(708)826-3977. 

72-33-1 60/K 
1987 STRATOS 

1800XL, laft, 5.7 liter V- 
8 Cobra,low hours, swim 
platform, ski tow bar, 
stereo, many more 
features $11,000 or best 
offer, Phone Linda at 
(708)662-6260 days or 
(708)360-0325 eves. 

72-34-108 
JET SKI- 550 partially 
modified, new paint, many 
extras, $2,500 or best 
offer. (414)657-7673. 
evenings 

72-34-43 
19ft. GLASSPAR 
Cabin cmiser with trailer, 
electric winch, twin 60hp 
Johnson motors, 
reasonable- offer. 
(708)336-9051 after 5:30 
p.m. 

72-33-144 

TERRY BASS with 

trailer, Johnson motor, 
40hp, trolling motor, 
$1,800 after 6 p.m. 
(708)949-5759. 

72-34-1 19/G 
19rt. GALAXY Bow 
Rider 120 OMC outdrive, 
good condition, new 
cover, $4,500 (815)385- 
5543. 

72-34-113 
t9ft. GLASSPAR 
Cabin cruiser with traiier, 
electric winch, twin 60hp 
Johnson motors. 
Reasonable offer 
considered. (708)336- 
9051. after 5:30pm. 

72-34-110 

BASS TRACKER TXS. 

17ft, Mariner 45 hp, power 
trim, Minnkota trolling 
motor, 5 speed, drive-on 
Tracker trailer, spare tire, 
live well with timer, (2) 6 
gallon gas tanks, deep 
cycle battery for trolling, 
flasher graph in dash, 
Humminbird LCR 4000, 
anchor and anchor mate, 
canvas for boat and motor, 
2 life vests, $5,800 or best. 
(708)587-1262. after 
6p.m. 

72-34-70 
1957 Century 

Mahogany Boat, bottom 
needs work, $1,500 or 
best. (815)385-4560. 

72-34-63 
1976 CENTURY 

Coronado hardtop boat, 
$9,500 or best. (815)385- 
6307. 

72-34-84 
SEA RAY 20ft. loss 
than 400 hours, excellent 
condition. $6,600 or best 
offer. (708)351-9229. 

72-34-21 
1991 BAYLINER 20ft 
cuddy under 15 hours on 
motor. Price-balance 
owed. (708)740-4357. 

72-34-54 
18ft RESTORED 

WOOD 1959 Cruiser, 
excellent condition, 60hp 
Johnson motor, mns great. 
Asking $2,000 (708)223- 
2526. 

72-34-103 
1986 TAYLOR JET 
BOAT, 330hp, 20ft, 200 
hour use, "showroom 
condition" $12,000 best 
Offer. (815)653-2449. 
72-33-42 



FOR SALE- 23ft. 
Pontoon boat, 55hp 
Evinrude, runs great, 
Asking $3,000. 17ft. 
open bow Runabout, 
lOOhp Johnson, Very 
good condition, Motor 
purrs, Asking $3,400 I am 
buying one deck boat, 
need to Sell 2 boats. 
(708)529-2264 or 
(708)526-5253. 

72-34-84 
19ft. OPEN BOW 
BOAT 1984 Sea Sprite, 
175hp, I/O. with trailer, 
good condition, $3,800 or 
best. (708)949-8600 days, 
(708)855-0151 eves, Ask 
for Jim, leave message. 

72-33-138 
14ft. ALUMINUM 
BASS boat with 18hp 
Evinrude with Dilly trailer. 
Call, J.J. after 4:30p.m. 
(708)578-1537. 

G72-32/33-173/L 

SEVEN 4'X10* 

SECTIONS - Of 

Wolmanized Pier, plus 
support posts and cross 
bars. Best offer. (708)395- 
8312 after 6 p.m. 
72-TF-77 



.utnping 




8ft. SLIDE-IN camper 

$800 or best offer. 
(708)587-7974 

73-33-83 
1975 CAMPING 

TRAILER 'Free Spirit" 
24ft, self contained, 
$3,000 or best offer, 
ALSO, shed at Timber 
Lake Camp Grounds in 
Antioch, Can both stay on 
lot at a fee. (414)694- 
6025. 

73-33-37/G 



Travel/ 
Vacation 




TRAVEL TRAILER. 

"Brand-new" 1992 29ft, 
Franklin, self contained, 
central air, rubber roof, 
awning, microwave, 
stereo, completely 
loaded. Trade- 

ins/Rnancing available. Rte 
.45 and Gages Lake Rd. 
Discount prices. 
(708)223-5541. 

74-34-3/G 
TRAVEL and 

RECREATION. An 
Unforgettable Riverboat 
Cruisel Enjoy Mississippi 
Riverboat fun, 

entertainment and casino 
games. Your best source 
of Information on Cruises, 
Hotels, Dining. Callers 
receive up to $100 in Free 
Discount Coupons. 
1(900)STM-BOAT. 
$5.70 call. Echo 
communications. 

74-00-1 36 

SportB 
Equipment 




ROWING MACHINE- 
2yrs old $100 or best 
(708)223-1369 after 
5:30p.m. 

75-34-75 




Care 
For Sale 



1935 CHEVROLET 3 
window coupe, originall 
Reasonable offer 
(414)652-4422. 

80-34-90/K 
19 9 1 RED' 

CHRYSLER LeBaron 
convertible, 6-cylinder low 
mileage. Must sell, college 
bound. My loss is your 
GainI (708)566-5867 

80-34-57 
1986 PONTIAC 6000, 
4-door, white, loaded, 
excellent condition, 
$2,500 (708)639-9830. 

80-34-58 
1977 CHRYSLER 
New Yorker, runs good. 
$350 or best offer, 1960 
Desoto Firelight 
Restorable, best 
reasonable offer 
(815)675-2178 after 
6p,m. 

80-34-65 



Cara 
For Sale 




SPECIAL TOY 1971 

Cadillac Eldorado 
convertible, 55K miles, all 
original, mint, $12,000 
(708)438-2655. 

80-33-47 
1988 BERETTA GTU 
special ground effects 
package, 16' custom 
wheels, bright red, 5- 
speed. 2,8 V6, great 
am/fm cassette deck and 
equalizer, tow miles, 
excelient condition. Must 
seel $8,300 (414)279- 
6578. 

80-32/33-122 
1964 AUDI SODO-S, 
55 K miles, all power 
options, mechanically 
sound $3,800 (708)356- 
2538. 

80-34-56 
1984 PONTIAC 

Bonneville great running 
car. 4-door. Low miles, 
am/fm, air, $750. 
(312)497-5261. 

80-34-36/G 
1986 OLDS 442, 
bodyman special, project 
car, restorable. Best offer 
(708)740-1175. 
1986 FORD Crown 
Victoria, Black, 4-door, 8- 
cylinder, loaded, car 
phone optional. $4,000 
(708)249-4923. 
1964 BUICK 

SKYLARK 455 with 456, 
needs work. Must sett. 
First $1,500,(708)223- 
7405 

1976 BUICK 

ELECTRA 455 like new 
tires, some rust. $225. 
(708)587-8184 after 
2p.m. 

1990 CHRYSLER 
LeBaron, excellent 
condition. 19,000 miles. 
Must sell. $10,500 
(708)872-8207 or 
(708)578-4858. 
1988 LINCOLN 

TOWNCAR excellent 
condition $9,500 or best 
Silver with manjon leather 
Interior. (708)587-2089. 

1985 PONTIAC 
Trans-Am black T-top, 
$5,000 Must sell Going to 
cotlegel 1984 Honda 
Magna 500oc 5,800 miles, 
$1,000 (708)295-3483. 
1984 T-BIFfD lurbo 
coupe looks great, runs 
well, asking $2,200 
(708)587-4575 

80-34-60 
1984 PONTIAq 

FIERO, extra clean, 
exterior red, runs great, 
56,000 miles, air, 4- 
speed, alarm, $3,500 
(708)223-7151 after 
5p,m. 

1990 JEEP 

WRANGLER, Metalic 
blue, many extras. 
Warranty, $10,975. ALSO 

1984 Honda interceptor 
lOOOcc Excellent 
condition. 6,000 miles. 
Garaged. $3,200 
(708)864-7214. 

RED AND READY 
Camaro, 1985, black 
interior, 305 V8, 4 barrel, 
T-tops, air. power 
steering, power brakes, 
cruise, plus never driven 
in snow, garage kept, 
13,000 miles $7,500 
(815)344-4803. 

1976 CADILLAC 
Seville, low miles, like 
newl Must see. $6,500 or 
best (708)680-9156 

1986 AUDI 5000CS 
Turbo power everything, 
metallic gray, good 
condition $5,800 
(708)223-6838 after 
5p.m. 

CHRYSLER '89 

LeBaron GTC, turbo, 
loaded, excellent 
condition, new brakes, 
30,000 miles. $9,900 or 
best (708)816-8129 
1989 MUSTANG LX, 
39,000 miles, fully loaded, 
weekdays after 6pm. Ask 
for Kim (708)223-9399 

1985 TOYOTA Land 
Cruiser, needs clutch, 
windshield and minor 
repairs $4,000 (708)587- 
1756. 

80-34-74 



Cars 
For Sale 




19 8 3 BUICK 

SKYLARK "T-type" 2- 
door w/high output 2.8 
liter V-6 engine, 
automatic, stereo, titt 
wheel, rear window 
defroster, alloy wheels 
W/P215/60R14 blackwalls, 
factory sunroof, but no air 
conditioning. White 
exterior, maroon interior, 
excellent condition inside 
and out. No rust. 103K 
adult driven highway 
miles. $995. Firm. 
(708)526-6745. after 
6p.m. 

1988 HYUNDAI 
EXCEL GLS. white 
w/maroon interior, 5- 
speed, air, electric 
sunroof, new tires, new 
brakes, recent tuneup. 
$3,950 or best. (708)433- 
6887. 

1984 RENAULT 
ENCORE gray 4-door, 
Rust free body, new tires, 
good engine. Needs 
electrical wori< or strip for 
parts $300. (708)729- 
4365. 

1960 OLDS OMEGA 
4-door, P/S. P/B. air, 

69,000 miles. Great 
shape. $1,600 or best 
offer (708)526-0442. 
1969 MUSTANG LX, 
air, cassette, loaded. Low 
miles, Arizona car, mint 
condition, extended 
warrenty. Must See! 
$6,800 (708)381-3621 

1989 DOUGI: 
CARAVAN Must sell. 
Low milage, (708)336- 
0898 eves or (708)402- 
8516 days. 

1968 MUSTANG. 

6cylinder, automatic, gold 
with black interior, 
California car, Restored, 
$5,500 (414)656-0385. 
CAMARO 1984 V6, 5 
speed, excellent condition, 
air conditioned, custom 
Panasonic Disc player. 
$4,500 (708)362-1068. 
1977 LINCOLN Mark 
V, 400 engine, full power, 
very little rust, ains good, 
$550. (414)843-2683. 
FORD, 1971 

MUSTANG convertible 
Fastback, needs minor 
body work, good running 
condition, $900 or best. 
(708)991-5661. 
FORD MUSTANG GT 
convertible, white on white, 
58K mites, power brakes 
and steering, automatic, 
am/fm stereo cassette, air 
conditioning, $6,900 or 
best offer. (708)740-2789 
or (708)740-5465, 
MUSTANG 1989 GT 
white/gray leather 
convertible, 13XX miles, S 
speed, MINT, $13,500 or 
reasonable offer 
considered. (708)295- 
3207. 

1964 CAMARO. Good 
condition Great 

transportation, many new 
major parts, $2,000 or best, 
(708)223-2238. 

1990 CAMARO RS 
black with T-tops, loaded, 
(815)385-3342 after 6p.m. 
1989 DAYTON A ES 
Turbo, automatic, power 
steering and brakes, am/fm 
stereo cassette, excellent 
condition. $6,900 or best 
offer. (708)362-9149. 
1967 DODGE Charger. 
383, V8. automatic, power 
steering and braises, good 
condition, $3,800 
(708)587-1964 after 
4:30p.m. 

1986 TRANS-AM 

Firebird, T-top, cruise, air, 
alarm, P/W, automatic, 8 
cylinder, 40K miles. $7,200 
or best offer, (708)926- 
2774 days or (414)632- 
4246 Leave message. Ask 
for Roxanne. 

1983 SUBARU 

STATION WAGON GL • 

Good interior, 68,000 miles, 
newer tires, good condition. 
$4,200 obo. (708)356- 
6184, 

80-TF-1S6 

1985 BUICK Regal 2- 
door, air, V-6, $2,000 or 
best. (708)680-9723. 

80-34-73 



Gars 
For Sale 




1986 THUNDERBIRD 
Elan ^lly loaded excellent 
condition $4,700 or best 
offer. (708)587-2433 
1988 MAZDA RX7, 
REP, AUTOMATIC, AIR, 
CRUISE, SUNROOF, 
ALARM SYSTEM, AM/FM 
CASSETTE. POWER 
STEERING. EXCELLENT 
CONDITION. (414)694- 
5979. Leave message. . 

1984 CHRYStEfl E- 
class 4-cylinder, 4 door, 
air, automatic, runs well, 
looks good, 66,000 miles, 
$1,600 (708)639-2098. 
CANT GET A DATE? - 
Buy my 1968 Mustang GT, 5 
speed, tinted windows, 
directional rlma, dual 
exhaust, alarm system, 
custom 1000 watt stereo 
and much more. Sure to 
impress the guys or giris. 
Call Rick at (708)740-0562. 

1985 ALFA ROMEO 
Spider Veloce Conv. Good 
condition, 26,000 miles, 
leather Interior, air 
conditioning, power 
windows, cassette, 
$7,500. (708)662-3863. 

1989 OLDS CUTLASS 

Supreme. excellent 

condition, A/O, am/fm 

cassette, cruise. Best offer 

(815)675-2244. 

1982 FORD LOT, 2- 

door, air, new exhaust. 

75,000 mites, $1,550. 

(708)680-1837. 

OLDS 77 TORANADO, 

Runs and looks great. 

am/fm, clean, low miles, 

dependable, $400. 

(312)471-4838. 

1982 FLEETWOOD 

CADILLAC, rebuilt engine, 

$3,200 (708)546-3012 

80-33-122 
1982 FORD ESCORT 
4-speed, 4-door, $350 or 
best offer (708)473-5908 

1986 OLDS CUTLASS 
Ciera ,garage kept, like 
new, 71,000 miles $3,650 
negotiable. (708)356- 
6316. 

1966 CHEVY IMPALA 
SS, 327 small block, good 
condition, $3,000 
(708)587-2373 or 
(708)587-1616. 

1980 MUSTANG. 
Newly rebuilt engine. 
Needs some wori<. $700. 
or best offer. (708)689- 
1969. 

1990 GEO PRIZM 4- 
door, dark brown, 5- 
speed, air, am/fm 
cassette, power locks, 
18K miles, exc. condition. 
$8,500 or best (708)918- 
8669, leave message. 

1981 PLYMOUTH 
Horizon, 2.2 litre, $900. 
No rust, Runs good. 
(708)578-1955. after 
4p,m. 

1985 CUTLASS 

CIERA 4-door, engine In 
good condition, excellent 
interior, needs minor 
repair body wori<. $1,000 
Call (708)689-8752. 

1982 MERCURY 
COUGAR XR-7, V8, air. 
automatic, good condition, 
$1,750 or best. (708)566- 
0804 

80-33-143 

1986 OLDS CUTLASS 

Ciera, one owner, 4-door, 
low mileage, full power: 
windows, doors, steering, 
brakes. Cruise control, tiit. 
am/fm stereo cassette, rear 
window defogger, $3,500 
or best offer. (708)526- 
8992. 

80-32n'F-S6 

1987 CHRYSLER New 

Yorker Turbo, loaded, very 
clean, 60,000 miles, asking 
$6,900 or best. (708)587- 
0757. 

80-33-78 



AUTO 



Bad credii O.K./No Down 
Paymont. 1967-1991 Models, 
No Credii Ciieclt. Low 
Monliit/ Payments, 
lOO%GuannteedA(^rovaL 
1-80I)-274-8141 24 Hours. 



just 16, 1991 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 41 



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Z2SSE: 



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■i: 







Service & 
ParlB 



CHEVY, FORD PICK- 
UP Bodies. Factory-new, 
guaranteed from $1,30D. 
Doors from $89,, Fenders 
from $50., Beds from $800. 
Bumpers, Grills, repair 
panels, cabs, paints, 
primers, abrasives and 
tools. Delivery. Mark's 
(217)824-6184, 
CLASSIC QUARTER 
PANEL SALE. Mustang, 
Camaro, Nova, Chevelle, 
Cutlass, Mopars, Pontiac, 
Chevrolet, and more. Truck 
pans, floor pans, doors, 
fenders, bumpers. New 
and California Rust Free. 
Mark's Plating and Supply. 
(217)824-6184. 



Vans 



19 8 4 DODGE 

CONVERSION Van. 
loaded, 4 captains chairs, 
and bench/bad, New 
battery, brakes, exhaust. 
64,000 miles, $3,950. 
(708)526-4694. 



Trucks/ 
Trailers 





1979 CHEVY STEP 
Van C-30, aluminum 
body, hardwood toot 
boxes. Must Seel $6,000 
(708)746-1650. 
1976 CHEVY 

CONVERSION 
window van, 350 engine, 
4 captains seats and h ide- 
a-bed. like new, good 
body, first $950 (708)395- 
7388. 



UTILITY TRAILER 
steel HD solid axel, 4ft 
cover, new tires, $400. 
(708)726-2825 or see at 
314 Cedar Lake Rd. Round 

CAP FOR SHORT BED 

pickup, made of polished 
aluminum, excellent 
condition, $650. new, will 
sacrifice $350. or best 
offer. (708)546-8756. 
4x4 1977 CHEVY 
pickup with Western 
snowptow, rusty but very 
dependable $1,100 Call 
Len after 5p.m, (708)244- 
9636. 

1987 RANGER XLT, 

Super cab, V-6, 33,000 
miles, excellent condition, 
cap and bedliner, air, 
$7,500 (708)838-0628. 
86-33-78 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO. 22304 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 

THEIR Qfflti ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered In the above entitled cause on 3/29/91 . 

Rhcxia Sweeney, Special commlBsioner for this court wilt on 
September 20, 1991 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the ffont door 
of Highland Park City Hall, 1707 St. Johns Avenue, Highland 
Park, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following 
described premises: 

28746 Monroe Ave., Wauconda, IL 60084 
The Improvements on the property consists of a single family, 
wood Irame, one slory dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certilled funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgement amount was $1 05,1 88.63. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
spodlled date unless iho property is redeemed according to law, 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney. 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalie. Chicago, Illinois (312) 372- 
4784 from 1;00 p,m. to 3;00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer Is OQl required to provide additional Information 
other than that sot forth In this notice. 



SHERIFFS SALE 

Sheriffs Sale 
State of Illinois 

County of Lake-Circuit Court of Lake County, Chancery Division 
Osage Corporation, a Pennsylvania Corporation, as Assigneo of 
Beverly Bank Matteson v. Michael B. Simon, et al, Defendants, 
Number 90 CH 348. 

Public Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Judgment made 
and entered by Said Court in the atiove entitled cause, the Shen'tf 
of Lake County will on Monday, August 26, 1991 al the hour of 
9fl0 A.M. (C.D.T) in First Floor Courtroom of the Lake County 
Courthouse, 25 South Utica, Waukegan Illinois 60085, sell at 
public venue, the following described premises and real estate 
mentioned in said |udgment, situated in Lake County, Illinois, or 
so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said judgment, to 

Vflt 

Commonly known as 25610 Arrowhead Drive, Mundelein, Illinois 

60060. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: Cash; premises will not 

be open for inspection; 

For information contact: John J. Oleary, plaintiffs attorney, 30 

North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois, (312) 641-5880. 

Pursuant to Section 15-1 507(c) (7) of the Illinois Code of Civil 

Procedure, no infornnation other than the information contained in 

this notice will be provided. 



NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 

OURHLE NO. 22060 

OT IS ADVISED THAT rNTERESTED PARHES CONSULT 

THHR OWN ATrORNE\3 BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice b hcr<?by given pursuant to a Judgcnncnt entered In 
the above entitled cause on April 22, 1991. 

I, Sheriff Lcnnon, of LAKE County, will on September 16, 1991 at 
the hour of 9:00 a.in. at the IJM<F. County Courthouse located at 25 
S, UtIca St., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, 
the following described premises: 
Parcel 1: Lot 4 In Block 2 in Townhouscs on Meadow Green, Unil 
Eight, of Part of the North West 1/4 of Section 17, Township 45 
North, Range 10, liist of the Third Principal Meridian, According to 
the Plat Thereof Recorded April 12, 1983, as Document 2207046, in 
L^akc County, Illinois 

474 Meadow Green Lane, Round Lake EJeach, IL 60073 

The improvcmenU on (he properly consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 hours, 
certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general taxes 
and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection.' 

Upon the sale being made, the purchaser shall rccelvc a Certificate 
of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a specified date 
unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorneys, 
nSHER AND FISHER, 30 North LaSalle St., Chicago, IL (312) 372- 
4784, from 1:00 p.m. to 3.-00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer Is not rcqurled to provide additional Information other 
than that set forth In tliis notice. 



Trucks/ 
TrailerB 



M 



Trucks/ 
Trailers 





1904 CHEVY pickup 

3/4 ton, 4x4, power 
steering and brakes, power 
windows, air, tilt, dual tanks, 
350 engine, 400 turbo 
transmission, both 
complete rebuiits under 5K 
on both, excellent shape, 
$4, BOO or best offer. 
(708)662-8597. 

86-33-141 

1986 CHEVY S-10 

pickup, Top gun package, 
4.3 liter, V-6, automatic, 
power steering and 
brakes, air conditioning, 
43,000 miles. Runs greaL 
looks great $13,000 or 
best offer. (708)356-1224 
after 5p.m. 

86-34-61 



16f1 DUAL AXEL 

trailer/ car hauler, electric 
brakes, good condition, 
asking $1,100 after 5pm 
(708)872-9255. 
1989 FULL SIZE 
Blazer Silverado 
package, excellent 
condition $13,500 
(708)395-3769. 
1984 FORD F150 
Duraliner, 34,000 miles, 
excellent condition, $4,200 
or best. (708)438-0414. 

86-33-80 
1989 FORD F150 
pickup, excellent 
condition, 47,000 miles, 
air conditioning, cruise, .V6 
engine, $8,900 (708)546- 
9248 

88-33-106/G 



Trucks/ 
Traliere 

1969 TRUCK $550. 

(708)438-5212. 
66-33-86 

1985 CJ-7 Jeep 

Renegade, $4,500 after 
4:30 p.m. (414)877-2487. 

1991 CHEVY S10 
custom, mini truck, white, 
cap, detailed, lowered, 
alarm, CD/stereo, $12,000 
or best offer. (708)546- 
5611 after 6p.m. 



Motorcycles 



s 



Motorcycles 



® 



Heavy 
Equipment 




BOAT LIFT, 1,5001b. 

capacity, good condition, 
$375 Amiga 1000 $400. 
(708)223-1314. 



MolorcycIcB 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSiONER'S SALE 

OUR RLE NO. 22150 

(fT IS ADVISED THAT IKTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

QM ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby givon pursuant to a Judgement entered in 
tire above eniitied cause on 4/5/91. 

I, Stephen R. Murray, Special commissioner for this court will on 
Seplsmber 5, 1991 at Itie hour of 8.'30 am. at the front door of the 
Lake County Courthouse, 18 Norlti County Road, Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell to Iha higesi bidder for cash, the following described 
premises: 37 Hillcrest, Fox Lake, IL 60020 

The impfDvements on the property consists of single family, cedar 
sided, two story dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sale tenps: 10% down by certified funds, balance wilhin 24 hours, 
cenilied funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to general 
taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. ' 

The Judgement amount was $1 00,326.54. 

Upon sale being made the purchaser will receive a Certificate of 
sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a specified date 
unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer al Plaintiffs Atlomey, Fisher 
and Rsher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312)372-4764 from 
1:00 p.m. to 3.'00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the Sales Officer 
is csl required to provide additional information other than that sal 
forth in this notice. 



ffi 



1980 YAMAHA 850 

Special, 3,900 miles, "like 
new", best offer. (708)566- 
9058 

88-33-133 



\^ 



f9Bl KAWASKI 305 
CSR, 3,800 miles, like 
new, King/ Queen seat, ter 
drip tank, $650. or best, 
(708)662-3863. 

88-31-128 

MOTORCYCLE- 1986 

Yamaha Viraga, 699cc, 
$1,100 (708)740-1256 

88-33-150 
1986 HONDA 

Nighthawk-S, 700cc, 
sport fairing. 2,700 careful 
miles, Showroom 
condition, $2,250 or best 
offer. (708)838-0129 
evenings. 

88-34-120 
1983 KAWASAKI 
GPZ-750, very clean, 
extras, $1,500 finm. ask for 
Doug, (708)249-4543 
eves or (708)680-3064 
days. 

88-34-66/G 
1979 CB-650, runs 
good, $450 or best offer. 
(708)838-0730. 

88-34-104 



1981 YAMAHA Virago 

. 7S0CC, 8,600 miles, $650. 
(708)356-3212 

88-33-107 
DERBI MOPED, Low 
milage, great for student 
to and from school $400. 
or best offer. (708)680- 
0816 

88-34-55 
1987 SUZUKI Samurai, 
garage kept ?. yrs 3,200 
(414)877-2635. after Sp.rn. 

88-33-65 
1956 HARLEY 

DAVIDSON, excellent 
condition, $3. SCO 
(414)889-4204. 

88-33-77 



Wanted 
To Buy 




OLD ORIENTAL 

RUGS WANTED: Toll 
Free number- call anytime 
(800)362-9933. Highest 
cash for any size or 
condition rugs. 

89-00-23 



y 




FREE ALLERGY SCREENING 



Do you wheeze^ sneeze or f ichV Do you have Ast hma; Hay Feywy 
Rose Fever, Eczema, Hlwea or Food Allergies? 

For Appamimmt, Csit 

Us. Oaniel Yamstion 
ALLERGIST^ Children and Adults 




GrayslaJKQ: 223-1400 



Wneeitng:537-55QD 




Chtircli Tall 



t 






Antioch 

Rev. Ian Lcilch of Edinburgh, Scotland will be speaking 
at the Chain-Of-Lakes Communily Bible Church, 23201 
West Grass Lake Rd., Anlioch, on Sunday night, Aug. 18 
at 6 p.m. The meeting will be held in the church's new 
building on Grass Lake Rd. just east of Rtc. 83. This will 
be the ninth evening of the church's special summer series 
called TEN OUTSTANDING SUMMER SUNDAY 
NIGHTS. 

Rev. Lcitch, an evangelist and Bible teacher, has spent 
19 years in itinerant ministry travelling extensively in 
Britain, North America, Europe, and Central America. 
Three-fourths of his year is devoted lo work with churches 
in Britain. Reared in the Charlotte Baptist Chapel in Edin- 
burgh, Lcitch has worked closely with the Scottish Baptist 
Union. He has also led evangelistic outreaches (c^Ied 
"Missions") for Anglican and Presbyterian churches as well. 

This year he was one of the leaders in "Mission Scot- 
land," Billy Graham's 15-day meeting held throughout 
Scotland. Leitch communicates the gospel of Jesus Christ 
in a down-to-earth, relevant manner. 

Also, in this meeting. Faith Wilson, faculty member 
and soloist of the Moody Bible Institute will be singing. 
The meeting is open to the public. Call (708)838-0103 for 
information. . :, ' 



^ ^ 



Bible Chmrch) 



l^isit out9{^w CfiuTtft 9{ome 



9:00 a.m. Sunday School (alt ages) 
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 
Tha Eighth Commandment 



Ian Leitch 
An Evangelical from Edinburgh, Scotland 

(Youth Program & Small Group Mfnlsirlas) 
Located on Qraas Lake Rd. (jusi East of Ri, S3) 



If you would like to advertise your 
next Church activity here, 
Please call (708) 223-81<il 






Lake Villa 

The Lake Villa United Methodist Church is sponsoring 
a Youth Fellowship Group. A meeting/picnic will be held 
on Aug. 18 at noon at the church located on McKinley 
Ave. in Lake Villa. The purpose of this meeting is to 
organize the group, establish meeting limes, elect officers, 
and outline the function, piupose, and goals of the group. 

There will be hot dogs, hamburgers, chips, sodas, and, 
weather permitting, a fire for marshmallows. 

Sue McKormick and Bob Amburgey are the adults who 
are going lo provide support for the group although the 
funcdons will be organized by die youths themselves. All 
youths from seventh grade du-ough 12di grade are welcome. 

Call Bob Amburgey at (708)356-9212 for information. 



Are you looking for a Splrlt-Fllled, Family oriented, 

Word-Based Church? 

THEN YOUR SEARCH FOR A CHURCH IS OVER 

Globe Evangelistic Ministries 

"Readxtry the unreachedL Loving U\e unloved. Touching the wortd wUh the 
power and reaUti/ of Jesus Christ' 

The Vision 

To establish a strong 
Local Church. A School 
of Word and Ministry to 
train young ministers. 
Evangelize L,ake County 
and the Mid-west. To 
establish a base from 
which to raise up and 
send out Apostolic 
Ministry teamsl 




Blake and Julia Hlggtnbotham 
ApoaUc - Sr. Minlalcr 

Ordained -lyThe Rockof Puumi Clty.FUTIu 
Irivdtd extoulvc^ la Ibe aUtcs mi ■txoid. 
17 ysuv mlnlsby exptrCmce. 



SalcHlle Mlntatiy'ofllit Rock rf Round 

Lake. Far more Infcrraatlan call 

l-80O-ffi9JESliS • 708-740-7625 

trwiltcP.O.D(H326, 

Round LokcIL 6007a 



HOLIDAY INN 

Rte. 45 & 83, Mundelelxi, H, 

EVERT SUNDAY STARTING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1ST 






42 Lakoland Nowspapets 



Friday, August 16. 1991 




rIA Virago 
Ttiles, $650. 
2 

.107 

>ED, Low 
for student 
chool $400. 
. (708)680- 

k55 

CI Samurai, 

?. yrs 3,200 
3. after 6p.m. 
3-65 

HARLEY 
, excelloRt 
$3,800 
4. 
3-77 




RIENTAL 

JTED: Toll 

call anyb'me 

J3. Highest 

<iy size or 

^23 




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OVER 
RIBS 

[vtxid with the 



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Jtrong 
Pl School 
Inistty to 
ulsters. 
e County 
est. To 
c from 
up and 
olic 



le Rock cf Round 
'tnnatlon call 
■ 70a-74t>-762S 
Dck326, 
IL 60073. 



;mber 1ST 




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fm^> 






by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A "ijajr of ba^etball at the College of 
Lake County featiui&di^es, half KJOi^ 
and three-point shots and free throws. The 
second annual Lakeland Newspapers 
Summer Jam competition even Had a . 
touch of the 1^ A, relatively speaking. 

The Warriors^ a group of fonncr Wamen 
Twp. High School athletes, won the "A" 
division, outlasting the Kings. After los- 
ing the first of two title games 15-13, the 
Warriors came back for a 15-11 in the 
second and final game. Matt Lingenfelser, 
who played for Warren's Sweet Sixteen, 
team in 1987-88, Don Bendry, Dave Silz"^ 
and Dave Kuerston comprised the champi- 
ons. The Kings included Ted Wagner, Lee 
Oler and Tom Les. Last year, a group of 
CLC players downed the Kings. 

Ld; is, the, older brother of Jim Les, who 
is in the second year of a three-year con- 
tract with Sacremehto, Les came over to 
the Kings from Utah last year and accord- 
ing to Tom, is enjoying the change of 
scenery, "I'm 10 years older than him and 
in college he broke all my records," Tom 
Les, now of McHcnry, said. The two both 
went to Bradley IJnivcrsity. 

"He n^y lUces'Motta/' Les said of his 
brother, who used to play for Utah Coach 
Jerry Sloan. 

Jim Les, whop^layedat.WaucondaHigh 
School in a Mendly pick-up game Thurs- 



day,;was the' top three-point shooter in the 
NBA, giving him a spot iii the All-Star 
game. Not too many months ago, Les was 
playing basketball in the 6-4 and under, 
league for Chicago, meaning a busy 





mm 



schedule. "We figured in the last 11 
months, he had played 155 organized 
games," Tom said. 

, At one stretch last year, he had to guard 
Kevin Jones of phoeni^c.form^ teammate 






three'-on'three team 



The Warriors, a group of former Warren Twp. High School athletes, won the 
Lakeland Newspapers Summer Jam competition at the College of Lake County. 
From left: Dave Sitz, Dave Kuerston, Don Bendry and Matt Lingenfelser. Team 
beat the Kings for thelitle in the men's divisbn^^ 



John Stockton of Utah, Jerry Porter of 
Portland and Magic Johnson of the Lakers. . 
"At that level, it is so much mental," 
Tom said. 

Hoping to attain the level of a Jim Les 
is Lingenfelser, who has become a key 
part of the offenses at Winona State. A 
captain , he averaged 14.3 points a game 
last year. "At Winona, we run a moiidn 
offense and run a lot of plays toward me," 
he said. 

The team was only 10-18 last year, but 
hopes arc high as only one player gradu- 
ates. 

The Kings ar^ no push-oycrs, as they 
had won a title at Liberty ville parks and 
lecieation league and formerly were a force 
in the Grayslakc Park Dist. league, 'fhe 
Kings stayed alive with a 15-13 vnn as 
pier hit the game-winner, preceded by a 
baslatby Tom for a Kings lead. 

The Warriors slowly but surely pulled j 
away in the second game, gaining a 12-9' 
^ advantage. This was fhe second three-on- 
threc tourney in a row for the Warriors, 
who were 2-2 at the "Shoot-The-Bull" 
competition at Grant Park. 

Winning the three-point title was Joc^ 
Kross. Jeff Connolly won the half-court' 
shootout while Dave Stone won the firce- 
throws. A team of Mike Rudd, Steve?j 
Humphrey and Jason Camp won the "B" 
division title. 



Tourney title ends season on a bright note for Aces 



t^ 



Hosting your own baseball tournament 
is a good way to complete a long, hot 
season. 

And winning it makes it even better, as 
the Waukegan Aces team proved at Bowen 
Park Sunday. 

The Aces had to rally and work overtime 



before downing Ottawa 6-5 in eight 
innings for the title of their own round- 
robin tournament The Aces had to score 
twice in the seventh for the 5-5 tie and 
once in the eighth. 

Warren Twp. High School player Jason 
Schwab delivered the crushing blow, a 




one-out sacrifice fly. Mike Madell hit a scored three runs and two RBIs. Tony 
home run, double and an RBI and Rob Grillo had two hits and an RBI, Don 
Mozena had three hits and an RBI. Carmenitti had two hits and scored three 

The Ottawa game was not the first one- 
run battle for the Aces in the tournament. 
The Aces downed Joliet 3-2 as Dave 
Farrow, another Warren player, picked up 
the win with Pete Aricnas of Waukegan 
gaining the save. Mozena and Schwab had 
RBI singles. 



Ed Pontecorvo had six strikeouts as the 
Aces shutout Elgin 4-0. Arienas had two 
hits and two RBIs, Mcdel had two hits and 
an RBI and Schwab had one hit and an 
RBI. 

The Aces had no trouble with Lombard 
in a 13-2 win. Brandcn Herlcl was the 
winning pitcher in the tourney opener. 
Arienas led the attack with three hits. 



runs. 

Following the tournament, as he 
prepared to leave for Missouri on a two- 
week trip to evaluate college programs. 
Aces Manager Ralph Bufano proclaimed 
the 21-17 Aces season a success. The 
group of players also played as Waukegan 
Pizza. Following the trip to Missouri, the 
fall leagues begin. 

"We'll have a group of about 30 players. 
Instruction is the objective of our whole 
program. Winning does not mean 
anything unless you arc ready to go to the 
next step. College takes precedent over the 
present, meaning winning or a winning 
record. To just play high school baseball 
is not fulfilling," Bufano said. 



Indians* hitting slump 
comes at the worst time 



ugust 16, 1991 



Going for two 

Matt ijngenfelser of the Warriors puts up a jump shot against Ted Wagner of 
the Kings in title game of Lakeland Newspapers Summer Jam three-on-three 
tournament. Warriors beat the Kings 15-1 1 to win the championship.— Photo 
by Steve Peterson. ■ ■ ' . ■ : ,-.. ■ ■ . '" . ■ . 



Post-season play has usually been good 
for the Gumce Indians' bats. 

Like last year, when Tom Carroll hit a 
home run to give the Indians a win over 
Chicago Americans for the league tiUe. 

But in two games, the Indians did not 
have the post-season attack. The home 
team was eliminated by a 5-3 loss to 
Hillside Sunday after falling to Chicago 
Americans 4-3 SaUirday. Gumec finished 
with a 25-13 record, in third place in the 
Shoreline, pending the outcome of a 
Decrfield-Wilmettc make-up of a sus- 
pended game. 

"We faced some good pitching in the 
tournament but we did not come through 
with the hits," Gumee co-manager Chris 
Suunowicz said. "That surprises me. We 
hit horribly in both the stale and Shoreline 
tournaments." 

In the loss to Chicago Americans, the 
visitors built a 4-0 lead early on two home 
runs and held on. 

Gurnee rallied with one run in the third 
and two in the fourUi. Steve Karolewicz 
singled and scored on a Bill Stranowicz 
double in the first. In the third, Mike 
Foote walked as did Jim Liebert. Craig 



Wallace then drove both home with a 
double. 

Gurnee had its early chances against 
Hillside. The team left four runners on 
base in the first four innings. 

A homer by Rick Balis sent Hillside 
ahead 1-0 in the first. Gumee got out of 
jams in the second, third and fourth in- 
nings with only one run scoring. 

Hillside piteher EIvy Shepherd delivered 
the knockout punch in the fifth, a three- 
run triple which put Hillside ahead 5-0. 

Gumee rallied for a run in the sixdi as 
Wallace walked and Chris Stranowicz 
doubled. 

Karolewicz singled to start the seventh 
and Foote blasted a two-run homer for a 5- 
3 deficit Liebert singled, but two strike- 
outs then all but ended the Gumee season. 

Looking back, Chris Stranowicz won- 
dered "what if' Gumee had its top pitehers, 
Vincc Gawrecki and Jim Cooney for the 
entire season. Both were injured early and 
while Cooney played other positions. 
Gawrecki played in only a few games. 

"We went with our third through fifth 
pitchers," Chris Stranowicz said. 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakeland Nowspapors 43 



-^ssss^sc^ 



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:-^^(&g£l3£S^S^: 



El 



- ■ jjij^ji g tjii^ 



-raRelahd's SPORTS 




^ndoch area riders net 
firsts in motocross race 



Although facing an 
influx of riders from several 
states. Lake County 
motocross riders held their 
own at the Lake County 
Fair. 

Local riders chalked up 
several first and seconds in 
the two nights of riding 
before an estimated 4,000 
people. 

Todd White of 
Libertyville won second 
and fourth place in the 4 
Wheel B category. 



Chris Shkyria, age 23, of 
Antioch, finished second in 
the 125B class the first 
night. 

Brian Battaglia, age 24, 
of Antioch, was fourth 
both nights in 250 A. 

Darrin Radcliffc, age 25, 
of Spring Grove was third 
and first in the 250 B and 
fourth and second in 250 
class. 

Doug Finney of 
Libertyville won the 250 B 
the second nighL 

Two twins competed, 



Dale and Dan Christensen 
of Wauconda. Dale was 
10th and 11th while Dan 
was eighth and 10th in 4 
Wheel B. 

Randy Schultz of 
Mundclein, 22, was sixth 
in the 4 Wheel B and his 
cousin Chris, age 16, was 
ninth. 

Edward Dominick, age 
32, of Wauconda, was 
eighth in the senior class. 

Round Lake's Scott 
Smith, age 23, was fifth in 
the 250 B. 



Local basketball players 
help teams earn seconds 



strike one 

Gurnee Indians catcher Mike Foote catches a strike thrown by pitcher Jim 
Liebert late In a game with Highland Park. Gurnee capped regular Shoreline 
league season with 13-9 win. Gurnee was eliminated from Shoreline League 
tournament with two losses. - Photo by Steve Peterson. 



Two teams with Lake 
County residents both won 
second-place trophies at the 
Chicago Bulls' Shoot-The- 
Bulls three-on-three 
competition at Grant Park. 

A team of former and 
present College of Lake 
County players finished 6-2 
in the junior college 
division. The members of 
the "Double Stuffed 
Ocrocs" were: Jeff Becker, 
Alvin Horton, Howard 
McKnight and Shawn 
Stanck. 

McKnight and Horton 
had played in the 
tournament last year. 



Two of the wins were in 
overtime, which featured a 
coin-flip and first-basket 
wins rule. "It's a little 
rougher," Becker said, 
comparing the competition 
to junior college. 

The other second-place 
finisher was the Flying 
Camels. They were second 
in the 28 to 38-year.old 



bracket with a 2-2 record. 
Team members were: Mike 
Ellis, village manager for 
Gray slake; Ken Jareb of 
Libertyville and Dennis 
Weisnoski of Chicago. 

The thrce-on-thrce 
tournament featured 
appearances by Craig 
Hcxlgcs and Horace Grant of 
the World Champion Bulls. 



Prepare soccer directory 



High school soccer 
players, male or female, are 
invited to register in a 
national directory to assist 
college coaches in 
identifying students who 



wish to continue playing 
soccer. 

Call (904)233-6681, or 
(904)230-8020 for further 
details. 




Grand Opening Weekend- 
|Fri., Sat., and Sun.,-Aug. 16th, 17th, and 18thi 



Join us at Brunswick Deer Park Lanes for the Grand 
Opening of the Midwest's newest, most modern family bowling 
and recreation center! The fun begins each day at 9 a.m. and 
won't stop 'til 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday night and 11 p.m. 
on Sunday! Our new 40-lane facility features Brunswick 
BowlerVislon'"— a revolutionary' bowling system with video 
replay, electronic scoring and all-new open playgames! You'll 
also enjoy our Billiards Room, Full-Service Pro Shop, Snack 
Bar, Sub Shop, "Tie Breakers" Lounge, and the finest line-up 
of programs for League Bowlers ever offered, including: 

• Achievement Awards * Trophies and Plaques 

• Pocket 500 Tourney for Adults • Scholarships for Juniors 



Free Air Travel for Seniors • League Deposit Service 
League Record Service • Discount Coupon Books 
Learn to Bowl Program • Birthday Parties 
Bumper Bowling, and Much More! 



Call (708) 438-5585 

for League, Team 

and Individual Sign-ups. 




Brunswick 
Recreation 
Centers 







44 Lakoland Nowspapors 



Friday, Augusts. 1991 






ilhristensen 

Dale was 

while Dan 

lOlh in 4 

lultz of 
was sixth 
B and his 

;e 16, was 

inick, age 
tnda, was 
ior class. 
5's Scott 
vas fifth in 



rs 
ds 

2-2 record, 
were: Mike 
lanagcr for 
1 Jarcb of 
id Dennis 
licago. 
-on-thrce 
featured 
by Craig 
ice Grant of 
ipion Bulls. 



lue playing 



33-6681, or 
for further 




i! 



rvice 
tks 











'ii 



Looking for yards 



Lake County Vikings running back Andy Lynch 
heads around end during scrimmage game against 
Chicago Hurricanes. Vikings start regular season 
Aug. 17 at Round Lake High School against 
Milwaukee. Kick-off is set for 6 p.m. 




since 1947 




Quig's Orchard 

Country Store & Restaurant 
Greenhouse & Craft Shop 

MICHIGAN 

PEACHES 




By The lb. or bu. 
Truly Tree Ripened & Delicious 




Cafe open from 7-2:30 

300 South Rte. 83 - 1/4 mile west of Midlothian Rd. 
Mundelein, IL 566-4520 



LAKES BOWL 

FALIi BOWLING 

LEAGUES 

Rt, 134- Round Lake 
(708) 546-2776 

LEAGUE SCHEDULE ^ 



MEN' HANDICAP LEAGUES 

SUNDAY FUNNIES - 9:30 AM - 4 PER TEAM 
MONDAY NIGHT - 0:1 5 PM- 5 PER TEAM 
TUESDAY NIGHT - 8:00 PM - 5 PER TEAM 
FRIDAY NIGHT - 6:45 PM. - 5 PER TEAM 
FRIDAY NIGHT - 9:30 PM. - 5 PER TEAM 




Ready, or not, it 




MIX£D HANDICAP LEAGUES 



SUNDAY PM. 
SUNDAY PM. 
SUNDAY PM. 
SUNDAY PM. 
TUESDAY AM. 
WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY 
FRIDAY PM. ■ 
FRIDAY PM. - 



1.00 PM. 
3:30 PM. 
G:00 PM. 
7:00 PM. 
10:00 AM. 
7:00 PM. 
6:00 PM. 
7;00 PM. 
9:30 PM. 



4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 
• 4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 
4 PER TEAM 




SCRATCH LEAGUES 

SUNDAY MEN'S CLASSI - 10:00 AM. - 4 PER TEAM 
MONDAY LADIES SCR. - 0:1 5 PM. - 3 PER TEAM 
WEDNESDAY MIXED SCR. - 9;30 PM. - 3 PER TEAM 



SENIOR* S BOWLING LEAGUES 

MONDAY - 1 ;00 PM. - 4 PER TEAM - 1 5 WEEKS 
TUESDAY - 1 0:00 AM. - 4 PER TEAM - 1 5 WEEKS 
FRIDAY - 1:00PM. -4PERTEAM-10WEEKS 



WARM UP FOR FALL LEAGUES NOW - WIN LUCKY BUCKS ' \ 
.AND REDEEM FOR MERCHANDISE OR FREE GAMES - VISIT j 
THE PRO SHOP FOR THE LATEST IN BOWLING BALLS, 
BAGS, SHOES AND SHIRTS - 25 YEARS EXP. | 



The dog days of August 
are again come to a 
screeching halt about mid- 
month. No more leisurely 
days at the t}each or over- 
time on the job. 

It's time for football. 

Lake and McHenry 
County teams will be re- 
porting for fall practices 
Aug. 19 in preparation for 
the new season. 

For most football teams, 
the summer has been spent 
in seven-on-seven leagues. 
North Chicago parlayed a 
sevcn-on-seven title at the 
University of Illinois to a 
North Suburban Confer- 
ence crown last fall and 



now Johnsburg is hoping 
to do the same. 

The Skyhawks went 8-0 
at the Knox College camp 
in Galesburg after compet- 
ing at the U of I camp. "It 
was a very good experi- 
ence. We played some 
quality programs," Johns- 
burg Coach Hap Farlow 
said. 

The Skyhawks were led 
by quarterback Matt 
Christman. 

Meanwhile, Round Lake 
held its own seven-on- 
seven wishbone camp after 
attending a camp in 

Bclvidere. 



Johnsburg came within a 
game of making the play- 
offs last year, before losing 
to Marian Central in the 
season finale. Antioch 
found itself in the same 
situation, but lost to Zion- 
Benton. Round Lake, 
Grayslakc, North Chicago, 
Richmond-Burton all lost 

first-round games. Steven- 
son downed New Trier 31- 
13 for its first playoff win 

ever but lost to Loyola 10- 
7. 

A rundown on some of 
the starting times for prac- 
tices for the first day or 
first week: 



Stevenson: varsity at S 
a.m. 

Johnsburg: 9 to 11:30 
a.m. and S to 7:30 p.m. 
Monday; Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday. 3 
to 6 p.m. and Friday, 8 to 
10:30 a.m. and 5 to 7:30 
p.m. 

Grant: varsity reports at 7 
a.m. 

Libertyville: meeting at 7 
a.m. 

Mundelein: varsity at 8 
a.m., sophomores at 9 
a.m. and freshman at 10:30 
a.m. 

Antioch: varsity at 8 a.m. 

Grayslake: varsity at 8 
a.m. 



Roth helps open bowling center 



Bowlers who visit the new 
Brunswick Deer Park Lanes 
may be shaking their heads 
a time or two when they go 
to record their scores. 

For the new bowling al- 
ley, which opened on Fri- 
day, will feature Bowlcrvi- 
sion, a three-year-old device 
which not only records the 
score, but can help a bowler 
improve his game. 

"It is an automatic scorer 
with a lot of different fea- 
tures. There are seven other 
games in additional to the 
normal 10 pins game," 
manager Rick Barbera said. 

The machine can tell a 
bowler how fast his last 
b^l traveled. "It can teach 



about the game and help a 
good bowler get even bet- 
ter," Barbera said. 

Deer Park Lanes will be 
the eighth center to have it. 

Barbera is planning an ex- 
tensive juniors program, for 
ages four through 18. There 
are 40 lanes in the center 
and 64 employees. 

"The hardest things about 



opening up a center are let- 
ting a customer know and 
finding and training em- 
ployees," he said. 
A Wheaton resident, Bar- 
bera has been associated 
with Brunswick for 19 
years, the last 1 1 as a man- 
ager at the Glcndale Heights 
center. He elected not to 
become a professional 



bowler, instead opting for 
the local lanes. 

Hall-of-Fame bowler Mark 
Roth helped open the lanes 
on Thursday when he ap- 
peared at a media event to 
benefit Muscular Dystrophy 
Assn. Roth was a profes- 
sional bowler for 20 years. 

The center is located off 
Rte. 12. 



CLC sets golf tryouts 



Tryout sessions for 
College of Lake County 
students interested in 
playing on the college's 
golf team will be held 
Aug. 15, 20, 22 and 23 at 
Foss Park Golf Course, 

V 



3124 Argonne Dr., North 
Chicago. 

Full-time students 
enrolled in a minimum of 
12 credit hours are eligible 
to try out. The CLC golf 
team, which consists of 




^■r^' 




"^K^. 




f.-->' 



Church Where 



'one ,;f| 
f^'is Welcorhet 

€\)xMm\ jfelloUjsfljip Cljurdj 

621 Befvidere Street 

Wiiukcgan, Illinois 

L.R. Davis, General Pastor 

Suriduy 
Wcdncsdiiy 



10:00 am & 
7:00 pni 
7:30 pm 



(Willi Classes For Chiklicii) 
For ^fo)•c liilormaiion Gall (708) 680-4455 



?S;Xi!f^ai)!mi(!««t<«ni#«*lMM3a»i^ 



Look For 

Changes At 

Gomlort Inn 

Mundelein 



seven members, is coached 
by Gary Hochstetter, 
former assistant golf coach 
at Taft High School in 
Chicago and graduate of 
Northeastern Illinois 
University. The golf 
season will start Sept 4. 

For more information, 
call (708) 223-6601. 




"Excellent Service" 



(708) 566-5400 

Rt5.45&83 

Mundelein 



OQESEOrt 

but I 



WOLLINE 

RfDING STABLE 

Horseback Riding 
Bring The Family! 

■Cookouts 'Weddings 

•Special Occas. •Slelghrides 

•Hayrides •Riding Lessons 

by appointment 

Hours OnBowasRd. 

9:00-5:00 5 ml. No. ol Lake Geneva 

725-4484 



J! K! 



pl^yu-mm- 



J^LJUB 




ONLY I ^ P OIN 

EMD THE WAIT... 

FOR ONE SPECIAL KID 




Volunteer Today; Call 




Big Brothers / Big Sisters 
OF Lake County 




One-To-One'Voliinteer 

Opportunities 

with Big Brothers/Big Sisters 

of Lake County 

* Juvenile Delinquency Prevention 

for boys & girls 12 and younger 
12 hours per montli, 6 month commitment 

* Pregnancy Prevention 

for girls 18 and younger 
3-5 hours weekly for 1 year 
monthly required training 

* Core Program 

for boys & girls ages 5 through 14 
3-5 hours weekly for 1 year 

Volunteers of all races, men and women 

18 and older 
are needed to stop the children's v^aiting! 

Little People Need Big People 



M »JH.-I H.lUl'—i. 



^^ 



S3E 



WJIfl^Ujyffll ^lWIIIIPt^HWIf^.»Hl^Jg;yi_^|^ll.»HU!W|iU>HllM 



usn6. 1991 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 45 



;'Sif*^ei.- 





BEITEII CAINTIVES 

Where we train you 
to train your dog! 

For ooedlence: New classes for puppy, beginners 
advanced ard oomp«ii(on, Eve, and Sal dasses. 
ForConfofmalon Classes; 
Wed. Eve. • Boginnof s ftOO pm.; Advanced 9fl0 p.m. 
For more Information call: 

(708)566-1960 

854 Tower Road • Mundolein, IL 60060 
Alla/fdtjtu tn Mid in sat k/gn^v MmhalwttUhn. 
Rcfltatorcd Aoofila for Talqo-A-Pel 



• REAL ESTATE CLASSES 

5 WEEK PhE'Licensing Course 
Starting Soon! 

Training Avallablo 

Cal[ 

TRl-TOWN 

(708) 949-5244 

OnlUIJ{L| Ask for 




CUS'M' 





BIG STORAGE BARN 

Bu JltOn Y our Property 

Big 12'x16' Size On Heavy 6x6 

Treated Skids Shingled Roof 

2x6 Floor Joists 

$1445 U-Paint 

(708)662-6381 

CALL ANYTIME 

Also Better GARAGES 




fUlLLAGE^^ 

ushopper: 




IS HERE TO HELP WITH YOUR . . . 



* Errands * Deliveries * Shopping for: Gifts, Groceries, Necessities 
If you Don't have the time, Don't ttave a way abound, 
Don't like going to the stores... Then Just Cai.l: 



(708) 546-8993 



By Outdoor Uvmc Specialties 
SPRING SPECIAL 

S6.50 pcrsq. ft. 
• Also Available • 

FULL LINE OF MAINTENANCE 

• Water Seal • 

• Restoration • 

• Staining • 

CONSULTATION & DESIGN 

Free Estimates 

INSURED 

REFERENCES 

(708)838-0093 
Antiocii 



HARRYS PAINTING 

Interior - Exterior 
Wallpaper Removal 

Quality Work At Reasonable Rates 
16 Years Experience 

For a Free Estimate 

Call Harry at 
(708)566-6297 



=^ 



^- BuiCKrop 

DRIVEWfiYS 




•Parking Lots 
Sealcoating 

20 Years Experience 

Insured 

GARCO PAVING 

708-382-1603 



Duraclean 

Rated best by 
independent tests. 




SeryINO your PAIimNO 
AND DRCORXriSa NSKDS. 

Completo Interior/Exterior 

Quality Work- Neatly Done 

FRKK Estimates 

Affordable Prices 

"Have tiie job dose riout!" 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24 Ilr. Message 




Carpet & 
Furniture 
cleaning 

CALL 
TODAY! 



(708) 



587-2356 



Duraclean 

SPECIALISTS 

Duraclean... tl^© standard of 
excellence for over 50 years I 



WE BUY: 

Load • Brass • Copper • Batteries 
SlalnUss • Radiators • Aluminum 

Aluminum Cons 
INDVSTBIAL ACCOUNTS WELCOME 

T & C METAL CO. 
(815) 459-4445 

Mon. - FrL, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
Sat., 8 a.m- - 1 p.m. 

1 Blocic Soulh ol Hwy, 170 

I Bah bid JUL Gam Station 

Keep America Beautiful! 




PHILLIPS SERinCES 

Expert? In homo Improvement 
and ramodoltng. Resldonilal or 
commorclaU 

Prywdii . Intorior/Ej^terior 

Painirng » Power Washing 

Home repairs • Decks 

Bank FIrsansIng Available 

FREE ESTIIVIATES 
(708)244-6612 



Home and Room Addition 
BiP lan nin g & Drafting 

L ParStagg & Son, Inc.Ll 
TEL: (708) 356-3039 
FAX: (708) "358-8747 

. • Call Today • High Tech Accuracy | 
23 yeaf^.QxporioncG ■ S 



46 Lakeland Newspapers 




ihOP SOIL 



Pulverized & Screened 

Loaded on Your Truck 

Delivered to Local Area Only 

Amhurst Business Park 

Rl. 41. M2 mile Bouih d Pulaski Dr. 
Across From the Bears McBubble 

2nd Location: Grand Ave. 

1 Mile East of Rt. 45. North Side of Road 

Bennett Excavating, Inc. 
(708)872-2957 




AS LOW AS $1/ DAY 
DAY 'WEEK 'MONTH 

(708)587-2095 



^..~^a^»-^CT;a»!gSt>BCj^TKB3SraCT3Z^ 



QCIflLITY HfiNDYNfiN SERVICES 

• Over 16 years experience in the construction trades. 
• Providing full time service to homeowners and landlords. 



All Work 
; 100% Guaranteed! 



V ElGctrical VCarpentry 

V Plumbing VPainting 




No Job TOO BIG or Too small 

Evening Hours Available (708) 356-3074 



Win 



ENTERPRISE HVAC 

(Heating, Vent & Air Cond.) 

SAt^s — Service — Installatjon 

Furnaces, Air Conditioning, Boilers, 

Humidifiers, Electric Air Cleaners 

Sheet Metal Work 

FREE ESTIMATE 

(708)888-4719 

^ 

iNsufffiD Bonded 




'Intimate Weddings 
.'House Flowers 
'Unique Parties 

CAJ.L NOWFOHA FREE CONSULTATfON 



FsTtlcnADoiBcttle 



I 

Ken Anderson's Auto 
AND Truck Repair 




4015 D Roberts Rd. 
Island Lake, IL 60042 

(70S) 526-4485 

Across from 3-D Bowl 



i 



O & G Construction 
Remodeling 

We build kitchens, 
baths, rec. rooms. 
We do garages, 
siding, painting, dry 
wall. 
20 years experience 

One call does it all 
(708)740-0286 




We buy aluminum cans, aluminum, copper, brass, 
£ainless steel, auto radiators, catalytic converters. 

p 88 S.Centre Dr. 

ptersectionof Rt. 120 & Rt. 134) 

^^ Hainesville, IL r^ 
; (708)223-1893 







Apple and Mac 

Equipment 

Buy, Sell, Trade 

Service 

(3i;g) 631-5884 



^Q^^ KREX COMPUTERS 
^U 6063 W. Dempster 
^^^^ Morton Grove, IL 60053 

708-967-0200 

BUY SELL, TRADE 
NEW & USED! 

f^^ I^gj Notebooks 

486/25 <^^^§r Call for $ 
486/33 

2yeaftVaffa/?f/Q/?/Vetv Systems/ 



ST 



computer centers 

• Training on Maclntosl^ & IBM 

• Service on oil molor brands 

• 13 technicians to serve youl 

3611 Grand Ave. 

GurneeJL 60031 

(708)662-2100 



HICflGO ^ 
OMPUTEff 



uslI 



I • aob-iis \mm mSmm M5rsu»r"vGA' 

moni(or,$l775 
• 386-33C/4 MB RAM/200 MB. Super VGA 

moniior,$2175 
' 266-16 MHZ/1 MN/40 MB, monocitromo 

monitor, $760 

USED PORTABLES. SYSTEMS. PARTS 
PERIPHERALS 

312-667-5221 

W& take trade-ins 



1- 



i 

1(1 



Friday, August! 6. 1991 



iifl9 

'DAY 
ONTH 

S095 



rades. 
indlords. 




Small 

!074 




uction 

kitchens, 
;. rooms, 
garages, 
nting, dry 

Tice 
itaU 

S86 



PUTERS 

npster 
,1160053 



DE 

Also 

ote books 
Jail for $ 

fstemsl 





•i-i 

'ii 



Wl ir.N YOU 

rOPTIIliTOP 

DONTSTOP 



"RECYCLE" 

We buy all alloys Including 
Aluminum, Stainless 
Steel, Copper, Brass, Iron, 
High Grade Papers, 
Aluminum Cans, Batteries 
and Newspapers. 

Mon. - FrI. 
7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 

Sat. 
7:30 a.m. - 1 :00 p.m. 

RECYCLING 

1600 MORROW AVENUE. 
^- ., NORTH CraCAGO 
^/iViiV;. 708-578-1066, j^ 



PA.IMTIKG SiERVICBS 



• Power Washing • Complete Surface Preparation 
• Brush Spray or Roll • Carpentry (all types) • Caulking 

• Residential Interior & Exterior. 

Commercial & Maintenance • Repainting Aluminum Siding 

■ Specially Coatings (rag, sponge, etc.) • Restoration 

Guaranteed & Insured • For Free Estimates Call 

Rainbo^v Painting Services 

C708) 356-5445 



■'■•*'jfef»^ 



s'i'/'iSS 






Top Brand Names 

Unbeatable Prices 

Expert Installation 

OuPom stainmaster 
Scotchgard Stafnrelease 

American Carpet Brokers 
C708)9X8-0IXI 



1 



Want to buy Antiques 
A Collectors Market 
In business 18 years 

Buying old picture frames, china, cul 
glass, pottery, sierling, silver, silverplale, 
jewelry, fountain pens, colloclabies & 

iurnlture. 

A Collector's Market 

Bring items in for my offer or call Carol 

(708) 223-4944 or (708) 223-6483 

Open Wed. - Sat, 11 -4:30 

299 Belvidere, Grayslake, IL 

(1 mile wost ol 83 on 120) 






Grayslake 
Healing, Plumbing 

and 
Air Condiiloniiig 

■Steam -Hot Water 

•Forced Air Heating 

Systems 

(708)223-6426 

Ask for Mr. Manfred 






J., I. !, 1, 1 ; f, I. I , ], L.L, L. I . 1 , 1.1.1,1,0^,, I, I . U J 



HIGH LITE 

RooRNG & Repair 

PAirrriNQ — Interior & EsaEntoR 

Gutters & TucKPoimiNG 

Storm Windows Instaoed 

Pressure Washii^g & 

Repair Work 

Free Estimates Insured 

Call: (708)526-6789 



How Are You 
Today? 

•Elderly 

•Handicapped 
•Partially Disabled 

Calls you everyday and finds out if you're 
ok. If you have problems, help will be on 
the way immediaiely . 

(708) 395-4221 

Mercury Network, Inc. 




KITCHENS. BATHS 
DOOR & WINDOW 

REPLACEMENTS 

SKYLIGHTS, DECKS 

SMALL JOBS A 

SPECIALTY 

Free Estimates 
(7081438-7908 



JENSEN 

Janitorial 

For 11 Years Offering Quality 
Commercial and Industrial 
Cleaning at Affordable Rates 

Bonded & Insured 

Call Now for Free Estimate 

(708) 587-9761 



jfiToM? Are Yau 

Tadcty? 

• Elderly 

• Handicapped 

• Partially Disabled 

Calls you gyeryday and finds out if 
you're ok. If you have problems, 
help will be on the way (mpiediatelv. 

l-»00-4:27-»525 

Mercury Network, Inc. 



Spiral Stairways 

Chormtng. graceful, exciUng, a spiral 
stairway Is a distinctive addition to 
your home. Soltdty welded In a single 
unit, inalallatlon la simple - a matter 
of minutes. No complicated assembly. 
Takes half the apace of ordinary 
atalra. r^ . 

S (414)279-5927 

OlBORN^^ f PIRAL iTAIRWAVt 

Box 343- 1 62 Walworth Street 
Genoa City, WI 53128 




•COPPER 
•AUTO RADIATORS 

•BRASS 
•STAINLESS STEEL 

PHONE 
708-223-0002 



-,JJ^-..-i=ij.t— j^J^JJ- i UllMJlHJ;. _B^ 




WKBPY 



•ALUMINUM CANS 

•ALUMINUM 

•BATTERIES 

•LEAD 

32270 N, Hwy. S3 

(Just South or Rt. 137 Before 

RR Tracks Grayslake) 



Red Toms & 



• Truck Insurance* 

• Auto Insurance 

• Restaurants & Taverns 
Insured 

VERY GOOD RATES, MONTHLY PAY PLAN 
& DOOR TO DOOR SERVICE 

(708)356-5777 

'Spoclalists in Sand & Gravol Haulers 



KEITH 



SEPTIC & SEWER REPAIRS 

Backyard Dralnago Problems Solvod 

• Powor Rodding > Sump Pumps 

• Sowor Mains '■ E|oclor Pumps 

• Sinks • Tubs 

• SeplJc Fields •Floor Drains 
RBvRaltjod • LtH Slallona 

Prompt, Court&ous Sorvloe 
Call lor FREE ostlmaio: 



s. 



1-800-273-3966 



PSYCHIC 

DIano's Psychic Studio 

Sartd. Palm. Tarot. Psychic. Crystal. 
Rogulor Ccrd* and many mota typs'i of 
readings. 

Diane's Sfudio 

Is having a two tor one special, with this 
od. She lolls post as you akjrro know il, your 
present as il Is, and your future to corne, 
without saying a word. For more info, 
please call: 

541-3105 

Abo does parties. 



TIM'S 

CONCRETE 

Additions, Garages, 

Driveways 

Walks 

(708) 395-451 6 





MAINTENANCE 

No Job Too SmafL I'll Do ft Ail. 
•Remodeling 

Hitchen% Bathroom & kc Room 

•Painting And Wallpapering 
•Flooring 

fill Types) 

•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

ill Work rei7 Well Bm 

FREE ESTIMATES, CALL 
(414) 537-2439 




AWNINGS 





CANVAS BUBBLE 

• Sun Out • Light Thru • Air Thru • See Thru 
• SaveOn Air Conditioning 

BRUCE BLACKBURN EmioiiCoNTRAaoR 

A&^-Tr/k "SlncB 1945" 



CANVAS 

ALUMINMUM 

BACK-LIT 



(708) J36-I045 






E & R HOME IMPROVEMENTS 
CUSTOM CARPENTRY 

Decks • Sheds •, Drywall 

Painting • Ceramic Tile • Remodeling 

Baths • Basements 

Free Estimates 
Dependable Quality Work 

Licensed * Insured 

Please Call 

GENE (708)587-441 2 



REDO WITH THE BEST! 




ROOFING • INSULATION 

SHEET METAL •SIDING 

GUTTERS, SOFFIT & FACIA 

LET UE RENEW YOUK HOMrt APPEARANCXI 



1-800-660-REDO (7336) 



DECKS PLUS 

G ENERAL CARPENTR Y 

'Custom Decks 'Porches 

•Room Additions *Basemenl 

Remodeling 'Bathrooms - Kitchens 

•Custom Carpentry 

'Improvemonts & Repairs! 

INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414)862-2993 
Please call; Gary Kolkau 





MAIDS ON TIME 

Old Fashioned Cleaning 
With Modem Maids 
'Computerized To Assure 
Same Maid • Top Quality 

Trained to clean your home as their 
own. Our supplies or yours. 

LICENSED • INSURED • BONDED 

(708)540-7754 



Mr. Buiu7 

Summer Flooring Special 



Vinyl 
Wood 



• Carpet 
Ceramic 

DISCOUNTED 
PRICES. 

Do-lt-Yourself 
or We Install 




Call: (708) 526-9141 

For II Free Eshhaie 



GARY*S 
DECORATING 

Interior • Exterior 

Painting & Wallcovering 

For a clean, neat job at the 

right price. 

14 Years Experience 
Fully Insured 

(708)587-6211 




tJha/UaAi^eyif ai/(Jxl4«AJX6>ltiq/ 



23 NORTH AVE. 

AWnOCH, IL. 

395-7217 



«iifiiiiiiiii^ 



WOOD SIGNS 

Hand Carved ~ Sandblasted - Rcxjted 

COMMERCIAL SIGNAGE 

archttectunau - real estate 

deveu0pm6nt 

Uqhteo 

Trucks i Boats 

GLASS & WINDOWS 

Etched - Chipped 

Ehamel - Vinyl - Gold Leaf 

Create Custoueh Awareness 

ABOUT You & Your Compahy! 



"GURRHNTEEDTOSBUEVOU 
MONEVflND VOURCREDiT" 



"KNOW THE FACTS!" Give our tape a listen. Our tape will teach you proven melhods. 

"IF YOU ARE TURNED DOWN FOR A LOANP Here are some critical sleps to follow. 

It you borrow and (ail to repay tiere is what can happen. Secrets of what creditors are 

looking for when you apply tor credit Secrets for getting Collection Agencies off your tiaclc A 

woman's right to her own credit You are never loo old for credit, here's whylll 

Negative Intonnation: Mow long it actually stays on, and much, much more. Don't t}e misled 

tiy false advertising promising you instant results. They just don't work Being able to obtain 

credit is no longer a luxuiy bul rather a necessityl 

Rush $9.95 Check/Money Order for your cassette tape to: 

CiG Credit. 1800 Grand Ave., Waul^egan, IL 60085 
or call 708-360-0080. 
MONEY BACK GUARANTEED 

ENGLISH SPANISH. 

Please allow 1 to 3 weeits for delivery 
Helpiny Clients Since 19S6! 



n 6, 1991 



Friday, August.l 6, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 47. , 



' ■^ '■^ ::iass!sist££ia s ss sss ^gxizesiss^ 



^*|^' *9>&*iBh wyfli<!iJj^^ 






k 



i 

'£.■■■- 

If. 



Ltikelarn 



f^aiT'i^i^iii 




X^^<i->»K^i# ^ 



- Your mm€F XM 




M&rviees 



!■: 



COFFEE MUG SPECIAL! 

White Porcelain Mugs 

with 

your1 -color imprint 

$1 .79 each 

CALL ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 438-7488 



I 


I 


I 


T 


1 


D 


E 


J. 


E 


M 




A 


S 


Q. 


s 




LAWNWORKS 

Trees • Maintenance • Shrubs • Sod 
• Landscape Timbers 
•Boulder Walls 

Also Yard Spraying 

Reasonable 

DENNIS ADAMS 
(708) 566-3231 




Licensed 
Insured 
FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS • DOORS 

DECKS • AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 






BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1 ,000 

Cash & Carry 

1/2 mile north State Unc RiL 

East ofHwy. 45 on County lYunk CJ 

HQRTON BROS. 

Bristol, Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Mon. - FrI. 8-5. Sat. 8-3 



CARR BUILDING AND 

REMODELING 

Home Remodeling Specialists 

• Hoom additions • Kitchens 

• Bathrooms • Garages 

• Custom Decks 

• Complete interior Remodeling 

Quality Workmanship at Affordable Prices 

Insured, Licensed and Bonded 

(708)816-3615 

Free Estimates 



1 



FLOORS 



U" 



WALK ON 



Corpcti • FFardwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 
Kitchen & Bolhroom RcinodcIJng 

Reiidontial & Commarcial Intiallatlon 

yVLL WORK GUARANTEED 




Free Estiulvtes 
(708) 356-2500 
(708)310-5220 



nmjSEciMAmxG 

• Personalized, Reliable Cleaning 
at a reasonable price. 

• Supplies furnished and English 
speaking 

• Satisfaction Guaranteed 

• Fully licensed and Insured 
(708) 816-19^8 



KENDALL EXTERIORS 

• Siding • Soffit • Fascia • Trim 

• Seamless Gutters • Decks • Roofing 

• Windows ♦ Doors • Additions • Garages 

FREE ESTiMATES FULLY INSURED 

Ask for John Gebert 

Days (815) 455-3036 • Eves (708) 587-8772 .1-800-4394036 



BODY NBNfKiEMENT PfilN CLINIC 

Dr. R.D. Ariazi - Chiropractic Physician - Certified Acupuncturist 
Bernard E. Metzel, II - Neuro-Muscular Therapist - Registered Hypnolherapist 

"An Alternative Health Program for the Total Person Concept of Healtti'* 
(Musculoskeletal Specialists for Sports Injuries, Chronic and Acute Pain) 



Acupunciure-Chlroprad Ic 

Nutrtiionlst • Hypnolhorapy 

Appolllo Control i 

Smoking Cossalfon Pfograms 

NDurO'Musoilar Ro-oducatlon 

Sports Massage Thofopy 

Triogor Polnl Thorapy 

Hydraihofapy/Cryolherapy 

Aqua Massage 

Thormo- Body Wrap 

Holloxology 

Ofihoblonomy 

Rolaxollon Massago 

Hoat Therapy 

Rango of Motion Tat)lot/Tonlng Tablos 

Eleciro-Stim 

Ulirasound 



WHAT COMDITtONS ARE flCCEPTEP? 

Acute and chronic pain relief, migraine, tension 
cluster and sinus headaches, trigeminal neuralgia, 
bladder dysfunction, bed wetting, cervical (neck) 
pain, upper and mid-back pain, tow back pain 
sciatica, osteoarthritis, sprains and strains, frozen 
shoulder, tennis elbow, pos I -operative pain relief, 
gastric problems, asthma, allergies, skin conditions, 
hemorrhoids, abnormal blood pressure, latigue, 
anxiety, neurofogic syndrome, various eye 
problems, etc., etc. 

This is only a partial list of the numerous 
conditions the services have been credited with 
helping. 



Call for Uppt (800) 339-6878 - (708) 395-2331 

Heritage Medical Building, 600 Main St., Antloch, IL 60002 



48 Lakoland Nowspapori 



AT MT OFMCE 

♦Camera Ready Publishing 

— Hyers 

—Coupons 

—Postcards 
•Direct Mail Services 

—Database 

—labels 

—Envelopes 

1-800-540-9108 
Free pickup and delivery 



Fine 
Homes 




by 

Paul Zasadll 

•Newr Homes •Renovations 
•Additions -Carpentry 

(708)566-4724 



I'niitliiit;, Wnllpnpcrin^f 

Expert Instnllnlion 

I'Dpor • Fabric • Vinyl 



DECORATING 

INSURED 

i (708) 395-8428 



DDDDCJDnnnncmDnaDDaDnnnn 

gPersonal Computer § 
R Services g 

n 

D 

n 
a 

D 

p 

D 

n 

D 
D 
D 
D 
D 



D ^Professional Consultation 

BA^Sales 
A Installation * 

B STRATEGIC BUSINESS 
R SYSTEMS 

Q (414)656-1577 

aaDDaaDDDDDDDDDDDDDnDDl 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708)587-9729 




GRAMI OPEl^ING 

Small Engine Repair 

•Dirt Bikes 
•Snowmobiles 

(also porlormancG 
onhancemontl) 

•Jet Skis 
•Tractors 
•Lawn Mowers 
•Chain Saws ^ 
•Weedeaters^:!^ 

Free Pickup & Delivery 
Call 

PEGASUS 

(708) 516-3400 

126Jandus Cut-off Rd. 

(next to All-Marine) 

^ary, IL 

Open 7 days 

a week 
10am-6pm 







TOOPP s^^3 
GREEmfOUSlT^^ 

Vegetable & Flower Plants 
Of All Kinds - $5.00/f}atandup. 

Geranium Plants 

2 1/2' pots 850 Bach 

Perennial Plants 

Of All Kinds — S'psaf pot 850 Bach 

3 miles norUi of I/mg Grove, 

1/a mile north ofRoute 22 on 

OldMcIIeiuyRd. 




DECORATING INC. 



•REsiDEwnAL Interiors - ExiERtoHs 

•Commercial • Industrial 

•Spray Paikting 

•WaHPAPERING & MAir/TENANCE 

(708) 872-8001 
(708) 587-5771 



PI. UI%IK I I^iG 



Sewer, Water & Excavating 

CONTRACTING, ENC 

Septic Service • Repair • Remodeling 
22806 Loon Lake, Anltoch, IL 60002 

Call for FREE Estimates 
(70S) 395-8637 
(708) 452-1630 

S)at9 LIcGnsod Bonded & Insured 



Window 
Replacement 

Low as X88 




Installed 
Up to 73" U.L 



4X4-889-8366 

Ken 

"The Window Man" 



COVXS^LMNG 

SERVMCBS 

•Adult Children of Alcoholics 
•Assertiveness Skills 

Development 
•Alcoholism Recovery 

(70S) 223-8990 

(lUKE I^ SaiMIDT tCSV CAC 

& Associates 



DAiislEATiiiGa ■ 

COOLING 
(708)395-7559 

Air Conditioning 
Clean & Check 

$34.95 

24 Hour Emergency Sen/ice 
Free Estimates 

Menfion this ad end focgIvo S5 cbcoint 

u I 



HEATING & 
COOLING 

• PROFESSIONAL 15 PONT 
AIR CONOmCMNQ SERVICE 

• ENERGY EFHdENT 
QUAUTYAJRCONDlTiOraNQ 
SYSTEMS 

• AIR CL£AfJER3& HUMIDIFIERS 

• WATER HEATERS 

Com-enme Paces 

(708) 526-6286 
(816)459-2300 

^, Serving Vour Community 

/jl\ sales-service 

9 AnlndopendontLonnoxDethir 
♦*^ For 25 Yeir* 

IxfcaSy over 40 years. 



FInincIng 
Available 



ESSS 



24 Hour 

SttTvlce 



ROOD DECORATING & PAINTING 

PAINTING 

Inlerior/Exterlor Now/Old 
Wall Coveting 

• cabinet refinishing 

• small fumiture 
Quality Service for over 25 years 

Residential & Commercial 

NOJOnrOOSMALLORBlG 

IMMEDIATE SERVICE 

(708) 255-3916 




Cedar Roof 
Treatments 

Is your homo'a exterior wood suffering 
from discoloration, fungus, drying, 
splitting and other natural causes? 
Tho professionab at CEDARCARB 
will resicra & presorvo your woods 
beauty & Iniogriiy. All exterior woods 
treated 



• Roofs • Siding • Docks • Fences 

'UadotolookSionmf. 

Fuse Esvuates 

Call CEDARCAHE 
(708) 473-WOOD (9663) 




X> 9 




LES&JEAN 



587-3338 



tisriRMiiiun 

Hand Bnjsh Letlaring: Boats, Taicks. Windows; 

Magnetic and Banners; 

Rffijiod & Blaslod; Plastic & Motal Lotlars 

125 NipPERsiNK Blvd. • Fox Lake 



DIRT BUSTERS 

CARPET CLEANING 

• Deep Steam, Siiampoo, 
Extraction Process 

WOW! 

• As low as $8.95 per rm. 
(2 rm. min.) 

• Pet odor ramoval available 

• Next Day Service 

(708)726-1312 



t 



COUPON-' 



OWN A SWIMMING POOL 
BUYNOW 

MAHCH INTO SPRING with a HOT 
summer deal. Own A HUGE I9'x3r 
Family Size Swimming Pool 
Complete w/Deck, Fence, Filter & 
Vac. 

ONLY •088" 
WHY WAIT! CALL NOWl 
1-800-873-0287 • 24 hrs. 
FREE SOLAR COVER ^ 

■7 »•»•*• (pi ^^ ^^^^>VB^iP>»>^r> 



r BUYING \ 

Aluminum Cans 

*COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADfATORS 
*LEAD 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-0788 

HOURS: 

Mon. • FrI. 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

closed 12-12:30 for lunch 

Receive 2a MORE per pound 

over our current prices on 

aluminum cons 

77'__ 




Friday, AugusM 6. 199 



1^ 



^!>i 
^ 



^^sc^^^^ 



■■I 



^5!!" 






r^^SH" 






■ ■ 




Former Lake Villil resident tracks success 



!- -:■, 



''>-A 



■ <fi5 



l\*l 



Jeff Neal is raising eyebrows in the 
1991 American Speed Association (ASA) 
Racing Series, including those of his 
faiher-in-law, whom he has raced against 

"Though we uy to help each other as 
much as we can off the track, on the track 
I think of my father-in-law as just another 
racer," said Neal, who is originally from 
Lake Villa. 



We SERVICE 



The 26-year-old racer said he met his 
wife while serving as a crew chief for her 
father, Harold Fair. On Sunday, Fair and 
Neal raced against each other at 
Jennerstown Speedway in Pennsylvania. 

1988's ASA Roolde of the Year, Neal 
is competing in the full ASA 19-race 



TV's - VCR's 

FACTORY TRAINED TECHKICiANS 



IBeardsley's 

Between McAree iS^ Green Bay Rd. 

-—2923 SUNSET^-- 
WAUKEGAN 

623-0631 




BARK 'N' TO WN_ 



h 




'Boarding 
•Grooming 'Pet Supplies 

27607 W. Brandenburg Rd., 
Ingleslde 

(815)385-0632 



Hi)urt:U.W,F 

ttjn.-Sp.m. 

T-msii 

t t.m.-Nwn 
(olhsf imM \rf 

tfpcintnmf 




; '■'■■^ -s, ; 






'"■"■;■' ' ii rr"---^ — '—^ — i r i i \ .: .;. T. t m i . 

renter 



0^mXMM 



GURNEE NATIONAL 
BANK OPENS SECOND 
LOCATION AT HUTCHINS 
RD. AND GRAND AVE. 

Our Friendly Staff 
Is Ready To Help 
You With AU 
Your Banking Needs 



rPREE* 
JGIFTS • 



; FREE 
GIFTS 



I FREE t 
, GIRS J 



yy7 



SPECIMvBOMlS OFFER FOR 
OPENING A NEW ACCOUNT 



FREE CHECKING ACCOUNT 

INCLUDES: 200 FREE SAFETY CHECKS 

AND 

1 ST YEAR-NO SERVICE CHARGES • 

AND 

SIGN UP FOR A SAFE DEPOSIT BOX AND 

RECEIVE A MO.OO CREDIT TOWARDS THE 

FIRST YEAR BOX RENTAL. 

T\\\t ottar It «/hjccl to dunga writtiout nato. 




GurneeNatioNalBank 



Grand Avenue at Route 21 
Grand Avenue at Hutchins Road 

P.O. Box 708 Gurnee, IL 60031 

QfVsjQ (708) 244-6620 FAX if (708) 244-1727 

Member FDIC • Equal Houdng Lender 



ADD LIFE TO 

YOUR ROOF! 

Check now to avoid 
that huge bill later. 

/ Ponding Water 

/Blisters 

/ Cracks & Splits -. 

y Deteriorated Flashings 

/ Reseallng Problems 
Around Vents, Stacks 
& Other Protrusions 

FREE ROOF SURVEY 
for preventive maintenance, 

GLASSTRON 
ROOFUVG 

(312) 2Se-46@4 



Shopping For 
Auto And 
Homeowners 
Insurance? 



Get Met. It Pays < 



® 




We're proud to represent this 
leading insurance company 
with their complete line of 
quality products for your 
auto and home. 

Call or stop in today for a 
competitive quote on Metro- 
politan insurance. WeVe got 
some great insurance in 
store for you. 



Osmond Insurance Agency 

976 Hillside Avenue 

AnUocli,IL 60002 

708-395-2500 

SETMET.ITPAY5.'' 

|JVU Melropolltan*" 

2 _ 5 ''■op*'^ v^ CiMMir Ink/wa CoMinw 

*Ur' — ■ 



MetropollUn hopcrty uid Cuuilty 
Insurance Company, Wpuwlek, Rl 



series under the sponsorship of Zerex 
antifreeze coolant for the fourth straight 
year. 

"The strongly supported Buick V-6 
program has helped us make some 
significant progress over the power plants 
we used in 1990," Neal said. 

Nonetheless, the Zerex team is 
hovering around 10th place in points this 
season because an experimental ignition, 
which has not worked up to expectations, 
has cost the team some races. 




Jeff Neal 



PAID ADVERTISEMENT 



PAID ADVERTISEMEhrr 




Cancel The News-Siiii 

A plea' to News-Sun readers from News-Sun reporters, copy 

editors, photographers and clerical workers who are 

represented by the Newspaper Guild,. AFL-CIO 

Don't buy The News-Sun 



News-Sun newsroom workers In Wau[<egan,Lake Villa and Libertyville have 
struggled for more than two years to negotiate a fair contract with Copley Press, 
Inc., the California-based chain that owns the newspaper. 

We have offered major concessions to the company and have accepted most 
of the company's contract proposals-but to no avail. 

We have had nb wage increase for three years. 

At the last bargaining session in June-the first in more tiian a year-^Copley 
rejected new employee concessions and refused to discuss anything except total 
acceptance of all its demands.- 



We beliQve that total acceptance will 
newspaper and hanm individual employees. 



destroy our union, degrade the 



The company has refused our proposal that the issue be settled by an outside 
arbitrator. News-Sun Publisher Glenn Pfeil has refused to take part in 
negotiations. Mediation has failed to resolve the dispute. 

As a result; we are now asking News-Sun subscribers to cancel the paper. We 
are asking readers not to buy the newspaper on news stands. 

We feel forced to take this action. We feel this action is the only way to win a 
fair contract settlement after two years of fnjitless talks and, on our part, 
concessions. 

We need your help! 

II you support our effort, .please CANCEL 
YOUR SUBSCRIPTION TODAY by calUng The 
NewsoSiui Circulation Department, 
708-336-7220. 

Or fill out the cancellation card, below, 
and mail it to: The Newspaper Guild, 203 
Greenwood Ave., Waulcegan, IL 60087, and 
the Guild will do it for you. 



P-.i ■*='.■- r^-'^^^-iJ" -■ ^- ■ 1 -■- -■^J-- -J- '■' ■■ii.rTT?.^- 



To The News-Sun Circulotion Dept.: 

I hereby authorize The Waukegan Unit of The Newspaper 
Guild to immediately cancel my subscription on a date of the 
• Unit's choosing. I will not be responsible for payment of continued 
delivery. 

Signature: __^ : 

Print name: ___^ 

Address: 



City, State, Zip: 



Phone: 



PAID ADVERTISEMENT 



PAID ADVERTISEMENT 



^ 




HAMMERTOE DEFORMITY 



A delormed too b one of the most common conditions alfoctlng 
iho fool. This condition Is often called a hammertoe, mallet loo or 
an overlapping toe. 

A hammBrtoo is a fioxible or rigid contraction of a toe. It Is 
caused by a woaknoss In the smaJI foot musclos ol the foot 
which slabilize Iho loo. This muscle imbalance causes ihe too 
bones to assume an abnormal position. 

Shoes i«ill often lead to abnomiai pressure and (rictton on ihe 
top of the too, rosuliing in a painful inflammation of the above too 
joint. Often, this leads lo a hard com lomialioa H left untroatod, 
this condition may prograss lo ulcers or inloclions. Various forms 
of Iroatmonl available are trimming and padding ol Ihe com, 
inlecilons lo relievo pain and inflammation, orthotics (inserts In 
shoes to correct improper walKing}, removing a sectton of toe 
bona to correct the delonniiy, ■ 



if you are suffering Jrom this condition, or have any further 
questions, contact Dr. Lee M. Tisa lor a iJQ QOSL 
CONSULTATION ' to discuss your treatment options. 



Ucrll^c: Medical Ccntci* 

800 NorUi Main Slreet 

AoUodi, IL 

(708) 895-3339 



2020 N. Lewis 
Wuukegaii, IL 

(708) GG3-0C60 



ISe W. QiesUiut 
BurlliigLoii, WI 

(414) 7(33-6480 

M«odon lhl» ad *hw) (rsWnfl «n ippdn merit 

•X-Raya, Trealmont & Lab Work Nol Included. 



Having A 
It's Biller Time 

Invitations for weddings, siiowers, anniversaries, graduations 
retirements, personalized stationery, birthdays and many otliers 

Full Service Commercial Printing 
Fast, Affordable, Quality Printing 





vf 



(708)395-4111 

(708)395-1203 

Fax. (708) 3954232 



We're Your Type 

Bring this ad in for 1 0% off any invitation order. 

966 Victoria • Antioch 




Houra: 

Monday thru Friday 

ea.ni.to4:30p.(Ti. 

Sat. 8 eum.'IS'p.m. 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 49 



„-l--.>--v^--v ■.^■iri-'WS*|-f>«-«a5;J£-rG3s?.aVHI««SI2!SSS^ , .t*"-!"." 



¥ 






■^i^fa^^i'ir !■ Biiil^ir i ^ 



•i-<.M'-^'.- •-■' 



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az^>-i.a^- .^^ jv-g~^.w^-=^g;i5^sr^ 




^>. 



^^ 



To win this 1991 Geo Tracker from Power 95 and Rockenbach Chevrolet/Geo, just come to Hardee's, Oak Creek, August 
16th, 5-8 p.m.; PharMor, Green Bay Road, Racine, August 17lh, 10 a.m.-l p.m.; Speedway Gas Station, Highway 20 & 
Ohio, Racine, August 17th, 2-5 p.m. or Gumee Mills, August 18,11-3 p.m. Spin the Power 95 prize wheel, and if you land 
on a space with the Geo Tracker on it, you will qualify to win the Tracker when we give it away on September 7th, at 
Rockenbach Chevrolet/Geo in Grayslake. 



Brought to you by: 



r 





^ /CHCTWOtgr/ 



THE LAKESHORE'S HIT MUSIC STATION 



iieading Tlae Way! 

Rt. 120 by tlic Lake, Grayslake 



V. 



Qualifiers musL be at least 18 years old, and the winner is responsible for tax, title and license. No purchase noceseary. Complete list of rules available at Power 95 Eludios. 



S^^^S 



^^^■b 



50 Lakeland Newspapers 



I .. t- ^ t 



Friday, August 16, 1991 



!^ 



ifmrnmiusm 



i^L^i 



Lakeland Newspapers 




i' 



Former Chicago Bear to teach at CLC tfaisiiSiAi 



Curtis Gentry, former 
member of the Chicago 
Bears and associate dean of 
Health and Physical Educa- 
tion at the College of Lake 
County, will teach two fall 
semester courses beginning 



the week of Aug. 26. 

"Aeropercise" (PED 121- 
020), a one credit-hour 
jump rope demonstration 
and instruction course, will 
be taught from 9 to 9:50 
a.m. on Tuesdays and 



Thursdays beginning Aug. 
27 for 16 weeks. Rope ex- 
ercises, taught to popular 
music, are designed to im- 
prove muscle tone, the car- 
diovascular system and co- 
ordination. 



-- 1 HOUR SERVICE (in Most 

GLASSES OR CONTACTS cases) 



viaivn 






ALL MAJOR 
BRANDS OF 
CONTACTS 
& EYEWEAR 



PRICE & COMPARE • YOU'LL BE SURPRISED 

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE 
Ask For Details 

•Inner Eye Photography -Vision Training 
'Computerized Visual 
Field Testing 

Senior Citizen Transportation 
— Free ol Charge— 



(708) 356-2900 



•FREE COMPUTERIZED 
EYE ANALYSIS 

BIFOCAL CONTACT 
LENSES 

UMDEN PLAZA 

(1 1/2MILESWESTOFROUTe450N ROUTE 132) 

UNDENHUnST 



Dr. James Doherty«Optometrist 

And Associates 



wsiONCamRS 



•Eye Exants Available 7 Days A Week 
(please call for Doctor availablity) 
*MosL Contact Lens Prescriptions In Stock 
•Large Frame Selection 
•Free Try-Ons Of Colored Contacts 

WE ACCEPT 
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 



Under Same Management 

Ask About Our 

SATISFACTION 

GUARANTEE 



(708)473-1345 



LAKEHURST MALL (2nd Floor, Center Court) 



A Serious Weight 

Loss Program Shouldn't 

Be without One. 

Obesity is a serious disease 
that deserves a serious treatment. 
Thaf s why the MEDIFAST* 
Program is offered only under 
the care, encouragement and 
supervision of our physician. 

The MEDIFAST* Program 
is the finest medical treatment for 
obesity in this country. Based on 
ten years of clinical research, it has 
proven its effectiveness nationwide. 

The MEDIFAST* Program 
will enable you to lose three to five 
pounds per week without feeling 
hungry. The benefits are immediate 
improvements in your health and 
appearance. 

Once youVe lost your excess weight, our medical staff will also 
help you develop the LifeStyles" changes and nutritional practices 
necessary to maintaining your weight and health for the rest of 
your life. 

So if you're serious about 
losing weight, do it the safe and 
effective way. Call our office today. 




^iEDn« 



Your Physician's Answerlb Weight Control': 



Pet© Palw-ay, M.D. 



OFFICE HOURS 
BY APPOINTMENT 

(&1988 Nutrition Instituta of Md., Inc. 



2031 E. Grand 

LindenhursI, IL 

In the Victory Professional Building 

356-6602 



"Golf Skills-Beginning" 
(PED 121-039), a .50 
credit-hour course, will be 
offered from 5 to 5:50 p.m. 
on Mondays and Wednes- 
days beginning Aug. 26 for 
eight weeks. Instruction in 



basic golf skills, including Gray slake, 19351 W. 

grip, stance, alignment and Washington St. Tuition is 

swing techniques, will be $33.10 per credit hour for 

provided in this course, in-district residents. 

Both classes will be held For registration informa- 

at CLC's main campus in lion, call (708)223-3636. 



Fr1day.Augu5tt6. 1991 




c/ 



Short on Cash? 
Need A Loan? 

THE 



^ 



iMWIL© 





From American 
National 
Bank Is your 
SOLUTION! 



^^S 






ff 




^SERVICE CHARGE FREE CHECKING 



Free checking with any new consumer 
Installment loan of $3,000.00 or more. 

First 50 checks are free. 

Free checking Is good for the term of 
Vour loan. 



•'Fre*' refers to sarvloe charo* free on our Popular and 
Rogutar checking accounts. Other ciutofnary fees still apply. 



Call Our Loan Department Today at 623-9000 
Ask for Larry or Jim. 

Serving the community for over 30 years 




**••> 




*; American National 

Bank andTrust Company 
OfWAUKEGAN 

2323 W. Grand Ave., Waukegan. IL 60085 




\ 



^^n?^^ cflfflmmon* orrus. EcTOiggg 

F.D.I.C L.ENDEFS 

A Morthem Illinois Financial Corporation Bank 




Lakeland Nowxpap«is 51 



H6. 1991 



Lakeland News papers 




League of Women Voters plans *Day at the Harbor' 



North Point Marina, the 
countries largest pleasure 
boat harbor has opened in 
Winlhrop Harbor and is the 
setting of the League of 
Women Voters of Lake 
County's "A Day at the 
Harbor" on Sunday, Sept. 
15. There will be several 
activities including a 
barbecued dinner, nature 
walk led by a Lake County 
Forest Preserve ranger, na- 
ture games for children, ac- 







iit'^^.'^.!;af^ 



«^-^l^^ 



DOUBLE 
AGENT 

If you insure your residence wilh 

Anicri(on Family, you niay bs able 

lo save 20% on specilit oulo covciogss. 

Coll today lo see if you qualify. 



KUfTT 
SCHNEIDER 
1333 NOmH 

DELANY RD. 
GURNEE, IL 

60031 
249-2001 



AMERICAN FAMILY 



INSURANCE 



AUTO HOMi BUSINESS HIAUH UFE 
Amcikon romly Mund Irsumu Ccmpeny 

Mo4»n.W 43783 



cess to the sandy beach ana 
fishing piers, volleyball, 
kite-flying contest and 
demonstration of trick 
kites, swimming, fishing, 
volleyball, sandcastle 
building contest, and a 
short talk by Jim Labclle 
(Harbormaster) on the de- 
velopment of the marina. A 
highlight of this fundraiser 
will be a silent auction of 
many donated white ele- 
phants and entertainment 
items. The action will run 
from noon to 3 p.m., the 
dinner from 1 lo 3 p.m. and 
naturalist-led activities at 
12:15 p.m. 

Reservations may be 
made by writing the League 



of Women Voters, P.O. 
Box 124, Deerfield, HI 
60015 or by calling 
(708)945-1937. Adults are 
$20, teens (10-18) are $10, 
and kids (3-9) are $5. Pre- 
payment must be made by 
Sept. 5. In case of in- 
clement weather, the event 
will be held inside a tent. 

There arc six local 
leagues comprised of 700 
members in Lake County. 
The LWV of Lake 
County's board committees 
are chosen from the Bar- 
rington are, Deerfield area, 
Highland Park, Lake For- 
est-Lake Bluff area, Liber- 
tyville-Mundelein area or 
Waukegan-Zion area. 




IhefamiCy of JosepH- ^. 

Quido St, ofLal^ *]/U[a tvouCd 
Cil^e to e7(press their gratitude 
to the LakS' ^ilta Tolice 

II department and the Laf^e 
ViCta ^scue Squad for their 
prcfessionaC and caring manner 
in which they responded in our 
time of need, 
SincereCy, 
^Corence Quido and!famiCy 




ftp<*f 



lea^ 



MONDAY NITE 
NFL BOWLING 
LEAGUE 



I'oti 

" J/ie 
Gnine 
BaU! 





Choice of NaBowlInq Ball & 

owling Pin 



ing 
Choice of Authentic NFL Bi 
to Every Bowlerl 




Bmniwick 
Becrutioo 
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52 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, August! 6, 1991 




Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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PADS seeks volunteers to attend orientations 



Early September and 
October is the time that 
volunteers are needed to 
start their work in the 16 
temporary, rotating shelter 
sites for the homeless in 
Lake County. Lake County 
PADS (Public Action to 
Deliver Shelter), a program 
of Connection, is offering 
an orientation program for 
all interested potential vol- 
unteers. 

1991-92 is Lake County 
PADS fifth season of help- 
ing the homeless of Lake 
County and this year 
promises to be even more 
challenging than last sea- 
son. Last season Lake 
County PADS offered 
9,805 nights of shelter and 
served 28,402 meals at 
homeless shelters. These 
numbers alone show the 
need for additional volun- 
teers. Four shelter sites 
have been added to meet the 



increasing demand for 
shelter here in Lake Coun- 
ty. Volunteers will be 
serving a fellow Lake 
County resident since 70 
percent of homeless guests 
come from Lake County 
and 67 percent are homeless 
for the first time. 

The number one reason 
for being homeless the last 
several years was "Asked to 
leave by family and 
friends." It is sad to note 
that 17 percent of the 
homeless served last year 
were between the ages of 18 
and 25; 31 percent were age 
26 to 35 for a total of 48 
percent. 

Interested volunteers 
should attend one of the 
Orientation Sessions listed 
below. The three-hour 
orientation sessions will 
open the door to helping 
those who will not go 
home tonight out of the 



rain or cold or homeless 
children who will not watch 
their dad drive his car into 
the driveway tonight. 
Volunteering with Lake 
County PADS helps put 
hope back into those lives 
that have seen a side of life 
most of us have not and 
hope we will never visit 

Orientation sessions 
will be as follows: Tuesday, 
Sept. 3, 1991, from 7 to 10 
p.m. at St. Mary's Catholic 
Church, 175 East Illinois 
St., Lake Forest; Wednes- 
day, Sept. 4 from 7 to 10 
p.m. at Faith United 
Methodist Church, 414 
McAree Rd,. Waukegan; 
Sunday, Sept. 8 from 1 to 4 
p.m. at United Protestant 
Church, Park Ave. and 
North Whitney, Grayslake; 
Monday, Sept. '9 from 7 to 
10 p.m. at Chapel of the 
Cross Lutheran Church, 
2031 Dugdalc Rd., North 
Chicago; Thursday, Sept 



12 from 7 to 10 p.m. at West Washington St., at Queen of Peace Catholic 
College of Lake County, Grayslake; and Sunday, Church, 910 14th St., 
Auditorium Area, 19351 Sept. 15 from 1 to 4 p.m.^ North Chicago. 

Courshon appointed to AB/C Council 



The Lake County Board 
of Health appointed John 
Courshon, of Waukegan, to 
the Lake County Advisory 
Board and Coordinating 
Council for Mental Health, 
Substance Abuse Boaid and 
Developmental Disabilities 
Services (AB/C Council). 
The AB/C Council is made 
up of fifteen volunteer 
members with interest and 
knowledge in these three 
areas and has two areas of 
responsibility: to serve in a 
advisory capacity to the 
Lake County Board of 
Health; and to serve as a 
planning and coordinating 
council for mental healdi, 
substance abuse and devel- 
opmental disabilities ser- 
vices in Lake County. 



Courshon is currently 
Director of the 117 bed 
treatment center of the 
Gateway Foundation in 
Lake Villa. He also works 
on a consulting basis for 
Klestinski and Assoc, 

where he conducts individ- 
ual therapy and runs an af- 
tercare group for chemical 

dependency clients. Cour- 
shon has been a member of 
the AB/C Council's Sub- 
stance Abuse Advisory 

Group since 1983, and is 
also active in the Lake 
County Chapter of the Illi- 
nois Alcohol and Drug De- 
pendence Assn., the Lake 
County Fighting, Back 
Task Force and the Lake 
County Sheriff's Drug 



Abuse Task Force. 

"I believe in helping to 
make Lake County a better 
place," said Courshon, 
adding "I also believe peo- 
ple should do what Ihey can 
to help their community." 

The AB/C Council is 
located at the Lake County 
Health Department's 3012 
Grand Ave. facility in 
Waukegan. In addition to 
the fifteen members of the 
Council, other committees, 
advisory groups and task 
forces initiate activities and 
consider issues on mental 
health, substance abuse and 
developmental disabilities 
services in Lake County. 
For more information, call 
(708)360-6704. 




Caring for lawn, garden 



Record low precipitation 
levels this summer has sent 
up the red flag for home- 
owners and property man- 
agers alike. While record 
high rain levels this spring 
caused the growth season to 
begin two weeks earlier 
than expected, the near 
drought conditions we're 
experiencing has seemingly 
put a halt to the growth of 
the lawns and gardens we 
cherish. 

Although many villages 
and municipalities have en- 
forced watering restrictions 
there are still ways to effec- 
tively maintain your land- 
scaping. 

•Set priorities — If you 
are able to water, look at 
watering the plants that 
represent your largest in- 
vcsUncnt of dollars. In 
some cases your lawn is the 
largest invesUnent, but for 
many, shade ticcs and or- 
namental shrubs represent 
your largest replacement 
dollar value. 

•Deep root water— With 



a root probe, or a root 
feeder, water the growing 
perimeter of the tree or 
shrub in six to eight equal 
intervals for six to 10 min- 
utes per spot. This allows 
llie root system to absorb 
every drop of moisture, and 
lessens the loss of moisture 
due to a plant's natural 
transpiration, 

•Water when you can — 
The frequency of watering 
will vary during die dry 
times. Depending on the 
soil conditions, watering 
restrictions, rainfall, and the 
condition of the plan mate- 
rial, it is wise to water at 
least one time per week, and 
best one time per day. 

•Water properly — If you 
choose to water your lawn 
instead, make sure you pro- 
vide an even distribution of 
moisUire; water at a gradual 
rate so you don't disturb the 
soil. "Puddling" is a good 
indication that you have 
given the soil an adequate 
amount of moisture to sus- 
tain growUi. 



When you do get the 
chance to water, the type of 
sprinkler or watering sys- 
tem you use is not as im- 
portant as the time of day 
you water. Early morning 
watering is best for all plant 
material. Mid-day watering 
allows much of the mois- 
ture to evaporate before it 
reaches the root systems. 
Evening watering promotes 
disease. 

A plant has a great sur- 
vival system. If it's not 
getting the moisture it 
needs, it will stop growing 
above the ground, and con- 
cenuatc it's energies below 
ground by maintaining it's 
complex root system. 

Shrubs and trees may be 
going through premature 
dormancy if they're begin- 
ning to turn to fall like 
colors. If this has started, 
caution against trimming. 

Lawns can survive un- 
expected dormancy far belter 
than trees or shrubs. A 
seven to 14 day "browning" 
of a lawn signals dormancy. 



during 

and not deaUi. When this 
happens, it's important to 
stop all mowing. Only cut 
the portion of your lawn 
that continues to grow. By 
maintaining two to three 
inches height, tiie chances 
of retaining moisture in the 
soil is greater. 

If you think your trees 



drought times 



or shrubs have succumbed 
lo die near drought condi- 
tions try die "scratch and 
snap" test. If a branch snaps 
off when bent, or does not 
have any green beneath the 
bark when you scratch it, 
chances arc your plant has 
died. 

A return lo average lev- 



els of rainfall, supplemented 
by additional watering and 
as application of a high ni- 
trogen fertilizer will revive 
a dormant lawn. 




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Friday,August16. 1991 



Lakeland Newspapers 53 



Jst 16, 1991 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



Forest board considers bond issue to buy land 

1^ ^-k kl -m. it npii • •* •*•» #* _jl : 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Lake County Forest 
Preserve board members are 
expected to consider what 
Board President Andrea 
Moore calls an historic vote 
when they meet Aug. 16. 

The board will consider a 
$45 million bond issue, $35 
for land acquisition and $10 
million for land 
development 



"I think it will be very 
close. This will be one of 
the most important votes of 
the Forest Preserve in 
years," Moore said. 

The Forest Preserve 
decision to go ahead with 
the bond issue bid comes 
just after the county decided 
to drop its bond issue. 

The bond issue would be 
for 20 years and estimates 
are, assuming a six or seven 



percent interest rate, it 
would cost the owner of a 
$125,000 home $9 a 
month. 

"We have been very 
aggressive in the last two 
years, but with the public 
sediment, we have had a 
slower program. I hope 
people are willing to accept 
it. No other local 
government docs more work 
for the environment than the 



Forest Preserve," Moore 
said. 

The bond issue bid is an 
attempt to beat the Oct 1 
five percent levy deadline 
imposed by the tax law. The 
problem for commissioners 
is to weigh the call for tax 
relief with preserving land. 
"If this is not passed, it is 
something long-term that 
they will really regret," 
Moore said. 



There is a possibility for 
amendments to the $45 
million bond figure. Moore, 
a Dist 5 representative from 

Libertyville, said the Forest 
Preserve is unique from 



other governmental agencies 
in its bonding record 
because it has always use 
bonds to purchase land. The 
last bond issue was for $80 
million in 1989. 




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54 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday. August Id. 1991 



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payment & ^00 rqrundaljle 
security deposit duo ot tsaso 
inception, "Plus tax, tillo & 
license. All retntes applied to 
adv. price. 



^mw. 



"^u 



'90 FORD ESCORT 

Stock #91 P29. Flame red wUh contrasting grey 
dolh budtet Interior. AM-FM stereo. Super 
economy at a great price. Yours for just. 

'90 GEO PRIZM 

Stock #91 P27. Polar white with contrasting 
doth interior, automatic, air conditioning, 
AJ\^-FM stereo and mudi more. Only 






^ 1^' CT] 






'89 CHRYSLER 5TH AVENUE 

*^ Black cherry with matching velour interior, air, 
tilt, cmlse. full power, stereo 



'86 lEEP CHEROKEE 4X4 

Automatic, air, tilt stereo, power locks, medium 
bnsnze metallic wHh matching cloth bucket *f^ 
seats. 



'84 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME 

Coupe, burgundy metallic with contrasting doth 



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' '•!-. 


, ./ ^ 




! A . ■ 





Interior, automatic, air, tilt, cruise, stereo 



/ '1- 






-'1.^ 



. ,. ,,; 




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75th St. (Hwy. 50) & Sheridan Rd., Kenosha • 414"-657-6154 



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m^^ 



Frlday,Auourtl6. 1991 



LalcolandNi»wspap«re55' 



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iWpLYMOyTFr^cCAiM 



1991 DODGE Cbl^ ,_ . 

engine S^ore. #7788^^^:^^ 



^91 DODGEPyNASTV^ 

Am BAG STAND^tr^ liU. power locks. 
50/50 split seat, air, v-6. cruise, im.Hv 

#91330 ■ — ^-^^^ 






««Gia4l 



=:?&a,T;S&Lf* 





pLe. automatic, V-8. mep^bumper. 30 gal. 
fuel tank, cloth bench seat^l 111 



^Sic.^wer^mdo^^^^^ 
stereo/cassette & nnore^^?^3 



liirDODGE^HADOW 



988 



$15,888 



3i 



f^ 





air 7 passenger & more. #91996 _^ ^^ .lea.-* ^ ^ 



199t DODGE DAKOTA; 



b'^mt^r F F ! red in color, Cloth bench seat, 
c;^!Sm iS^^cKage. rear step, bumper, power 

steering. #91901. 



«l7,9i 







$868 







f 



je^^ 



N^^^ 



le^^^^ 



av\' 









;For Active and Reserve 
.Military 









i 



HWY.50 



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? MOTORS 5 



nip 

Just 4 miles East of 1-94 



5431 75TH ST., KENOSHA, WS 

^f%^ O' 1 ^-■;^ t^^ ff^ 



<:;aLES DEPT HOURS: MON. Ihru FRI. 9:00 lo 8^0 
SATURDAY 9:00 lo5D0 
cp^nrP mi IR.q. 7.00 till MIDNIGHI 






L?Si!;i: 







luMtT£D WARRANTY 

•Includes all mfg. rebates. 
Plus tax, title & license, 
ton selected models. Sec 
fi nalnr lor d6tailS -^^^_— , , , 

Friday, August 16, 1991 



56 Lakeland Newspapers